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Building Web Applications With Make

Most web developers use a build tool of some sort nowadays. I’m not refering to continuous integration software like Jenkins CI (a very popular build system), but the lower-level software it uses to actually acquire dependencies and construct your applications with.

Building Software With Make

There is a dizzying array of options to choose from: Apache Ant (XML-based), Rake (Ruby-based), Grunt (JS-based), Gulp (JS-based), Broccoli (JS-based), NPM (JS-based), Good ol’ shell scripts (although no real orchestration around it). The build tool I want to look at in more detail here though is the granddaddy of them all: Make.


SmashingConf Oxford 2016: Just Your Cup Of Tea

We love organizing events that deliver value and leave a long-lasting impression. SmashingConf Oxford is taking place again next year, on March 15–16th 2016. The conference will be packed with smart real-life solutions and techniques, ranging from front end to design to UX — and a few delightful surprises along the way. Two days, one track, 14 brilliant speakers and 350 fantastic attendees. Tickets are now on sale.

SmashingConf Oxford 2016 image

Discussions about design trends and visual style are often very subjective and they rarely provide actionable, valuable takeaways. Nothing beats a conversation about what worked and what didn’t work in actual real-life projects and what decisions were made along the way. That's exactly what we're setting off to explore in Oxford — accompanied by a lot of learning and networking in the beautiful pathways and gardens of legendary Oxford.

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Takeaways From Mobile Web Behavior

According to Ian Carrington, Google’s mobile and social advertising sales director, speaking at Mobile Marketing Live back in 2012, more people in the world have access to a smartphone than a toothbrush.

Takeaways From Mobile Web Behavior

With that in mind, it’s perhaps not very surprising that there’s no shortage of information about how people interact with websites on mobile. From specific usability testing and scrutiny of Google Analytics data to more generalized but larger-scale projects, we can quite easily gain access to statistics that illustrate how users interact with our websites.


Freebie: Office And Business Icon Pack (92 Icons, AI, EPS, PSD, PDF, PNG, SVG)

Everyone loves a great icon set. Today, we're honored to present to you two sets of office and business icons that can come in handy when designing apps, websites as well as for print.

Freebie: Office And Business Icon Pack (AI, EPS, PSD, PDF And SVG)

Designed by Manuella Langella, this icon set is completely free to use for commercial and personal projects, including software, online services, templates and themes. All icons are provided in five formats: AI, EPS, PSD, PDF and SVG. Additionally, PNGs are available in four sizes: 64 × 64, 128 × 128, 256 × 256 and 512 × 512 pixels.


Introducing RAIL: A User-Centric Model For Performance

There’s no shortage of performance advice, is there? The elephant in the room is the fact that it’s challenging to interpret: Everything comes with caveats and disclaimers, and sometimes one piece of advice can seem to actively contradict another. Phrases like “The DOM is slow” or “Always use CSS animations” make for great headlines, but the truth is often far more nuanced.

RAIL Performance Model

Take something like loading time, the most common performance topic by far. The problem with loading time is that some people measure Speed Index, others go after first paint, and still others use body.onload, DOMContentLoaded or perhaps some other event. It’s rarely consistent. When it comes to other ways to measure performance, you’ve probably seen enough JavaScript benchmarks to last a lifetime. You may have also heard that 60 FPS matters. But when? All the time? Seems unrealistic.


Web Development Reading List #106

What's happening in the industry? What important techniques have emerged recently? What about new case studies, insights, techniques and tools? Our dear friend Anselm Hannemann is keeping track of everything in the web development reading list so you don't have to. The result is a carefully collected list of articles that popped up over the last week and which might interest you. — Ed.

Post CSS

Every week I feature about twenty interesting links. Although I curate this reading list already from more than 50 resources, every week still leaves you with so much news that actually paying attention to all of it is quite difficult. I often hear from people “I must admit, I haven’t read your last WDRLs in detail. Sorry.” What do I reply? Well, I embrace this behaviour. Sometimes it’s not possible to read everything. As Tim Kadlec writes in his latest piece, you can’t know everything: “In fact, we can’t know everything about the web."


Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: October 2015

We always try our best to cater for fresh inspiration and well, we have found a very effective way to do so: desktop wallpapers that are a little more distinctive than the usual crowd. Since seven years, we challenge the design community to participate in our wallpaper mission and each month designers and artists from across the globe enthusiastically contribute their work to it. The result is a unique mix of ideas and styles, eye candy that is bound to cater for new idea sparks.

Desktop Wallpaper Calendars: October 2015

We are very thankful to everyone who took the challenge and shared their designs with us this month. This post features desktop wallpapers for October 2015. Both versions with and without a calendar can be downloaded for free. Time to brush up your desktop!


ESLint: The Next-Generation JavaScript Linter

It was the summer of 2013 and I was working on a project for my employer, Box. I had just finished wiring up JSDoc as a nightly build using a plugin to detect T3 patterns in our code and document them automatically. It occurred to me that these patterns might be easy to get wrong, and I started looking for a way to automatically detect incorrect patterns. I immediately turned to JSHint because we were already using it and I thought it could support plugins. Unfortunately, it could not.


Still, I couldn’t get the idea of a linter with pluggable runtime rules out of my head. I had just spent a bunch of time learning about Esprima and abstract syntax trees (ASTs), and I thought to myself, “It can’t be all that hard to create a pluggable JavaScript linter using an AST.” It was from those initial thoughts that ESLint was born.


How To Run A Side Project: Screenings Case Study

Did you know you have a superpower? No, I’m not talking about super-strength, sticking to walls or pushing metal claws out of your forearms (although you might have those as well, for all I know).

Screenings: A Side-Project Case Study

If you work on the web — which I assume you do if you’re reading this — your superpower is side projects. Unlike your regular job, where you have to listen to your boss or please your client, a side project lets you take on an alternate identity, one of which you’re in charge and no one can stop you.


Freebie: World Landmark Icons (AI, EPS, PDF, PNG and PSD)

Today we’re happy to release a new Smashing freebie: 18 lovely world landmark icons such as the London Eye, the Eiffel Tower or the Empire State Building. The icons are detailed enough to show architectural elegance but without adding chaos. They're designed to work best in both digital and print media.

Landmark Icons Excerpt

Today we’re happy to release a new Smashing freebie: 18 lovely world landmark icons such as the London Eye, the Eiffel Tower or the Empire State Building. The icons are detailed enough to show architectural elegance but without adding chaos. They're designed to work best in both digital and print media.


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