170+ Expert Ideas From World’s Leading Developers

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Few days ago we’ve published the first part of our survey “50 Designers x 6 Questions”. We’ve presented the first three questions which we’ve asked and 175 professional suggestions, tips and ideas1 from some of the well-known web-developers all around the world we’ve received.

Today we’d like to present you the second part of the article, which covers the rest of the survey and also presents an overview of the most important ideas and suggestions you should be aware of if you’d like to become or remain a professional.

Three More Questions

  • What is one thing to do before starting a new project?
  • What is one common mistake you should always avoid developing web-sites?
  • What is one device/tool or/and service you can’t imagine your life without?

Even More Expert Ideas!

You can find even more expert ideas, solutions and tips in our articles

You can also win one of 40+ books4 for professional design and development as well as one of 53 presents5.

First a brief summary of all 300+ suggestions, ideas and tips we’ve received from the world’s leading web developers and experts out there. Under the summary you’ll find a detailed review of all answers we’ve received.

Summary

4. One thing to do before starting a new project

  1. Invest time in getting organized.
  2. Clean up your desk.

    Getting rid of the visual clutter around you will establish an environment where creativity can flourish.

  3. Estimate your capabilities and capacities.
    always ensure that you have enough time and resources to do the job justice, otherwise you’ll end up cutting corners, pushing back deadlines, and deliver a sub standard experience to the client and the user base.
  4. Be updated about current trends.
    React to, don’t blindly follow, trends. Ask yourself, “will those new practices look as perfect tomorrow?”
  5. Get to know your clients.
    Ask questions. A lot. Don’t be afraid of sounding stupid, or being a pain in the butt. It’s better you get a complete grasp of a project before embarking on it.
  6. Communicate and listen to your clients.
    Immerse yourself in who the client is and who the visitors are. Get to know the client as well as humanly possible, understand their motivation, their goals and really listen to their responses. Ensure you incorporate what they have to say into your thinking rather than deciding everything in advance.
  7. Make sure client’s needs are defined.
    Get to know what the projects is all about and what the client needs. Not what they want, what they need.
  8. Make sure the scope is defined.
    Dive deep into any data you can find to help frame your project. That includes existing product metrics, customer feedback, market landscape, and more. Saturate yourself with context. Find out exactly what’s involved and work out (in your head, at least) how you’re going to go about delivering.
  9. Make sure the goal is defined.

    Talk with the client. Understand their goals. Once you know this, your solutions can target those goals. Without it, it’s hard to defend a design. With it, you can explain how and why your design solves those problems.

  10. Make sure you have a good plan.
    Planning on paper helps you stay focused and ensures you won’t forget any of your ideas as you dive into the work. You don’t have to come up with a rigid schedule, but identifying key milestones, and what steps you need to do to complete them BEFORE you start will help keep you on track.
  11. Affirm the vision for the project.
    Often objectives summaries and punch lists aren’t enough, even a seminal vision should be reviewed in a casual brainstorming session to be sure that the initial steps taken are going to be productive and adversity averted.
  12. Observe the competition.
    You want to learn from the mistakes of your competition, even if you’re not out to make a buck on whatever it is you’re creating. Find out what they did right, what they did wrong, and what they didn’t do at all.
  13. Get money up front.
    Did I say get money up front? No matter how small you are, the client should respect you enough to pay you to get started.
  14. Clear your mind.
    If feasible, finish up previous projects or at least major milestones before starting a new project. This will help take any pressure off and clear your mind.
  15. Brainstorm, sketch!
    Write down as many random ideas and sketches as you can on pieces of paper. Nothing has to make sense or have any real value — but just get the ideas out on paper.
  16. Discuss your decisions.
    Bounce off your ideas with someone who has a keen critical sense. Research till you drop. Get as much collateral information about the market, similar projects. Clarify the brief till there are NO gray zone, because this will become your twilight zone.

5. One common mistake you should always avoid developing web-sites

  1. Starting with a wrong approach.
    Never assume clients have the same goals as you. At least an hour out of your day should be dedicated to email, IM, phone. Never try to fit an idea into a design or a CMS.
  2. Designing before planning.
    Building the design before planning the structure of the HTML templates can too often result in last-minute hacks.
  3. Thinking that at some point you’re done.
    Successful websites are organic. You are never done.
  4. Rushing in.

    Don’t rush into production. The ink is barely dry on the contract and already they are opening Photoshop and editing code. Not enough time is given to laying the ground work. A good web designer needs to understand the context of the project. Why is the site being built? Who is the target audience? What call to action do you want them to complete? Who are the competition? How is the sites success going to be judged? Having all of this information at your fingertips makes the design and development stages much easier.

  5. Having a print mentality.
    A web page isn’t a piece of paper, and accommodating different font sizes, or even different window sizes (or different media!) is a brilliant, powerful feature of the web.
  6. Not accounting for unknowns.
    Schedules change. Availability changes. Things happen. This kind of gets back to organization. Good planning is difficult and takes a significant amount of time.
  7. Planning up front.
    Thinking about the results before you’ve done the process. Don’t just spit out a site that fits the CMS template.
  8. Copying ideas.
    Looking too much at other sites to determine what the design should look like, instead of thinking about the specific needs of the site on which you’re working. Don’t worry about what the other guy is doing. Think for yourself. If all social networking sites had the same features and design, what would be the point of having more than one?
  9. Copying yourself.
    Don’t settle with what’s comfortable, or try to force a style on yourself. This goes for fonts, colors, techniques… try to do something different every time. If you have a distinct style, it’s going to come through anyway, without having to force it.
  10. Putting yourself or/and your clients first.

    Don’t design or develop for yourself or for your client instead of for your client’s visitors. The best sites always focus on the needs of the user and are designed from the outside in.

  11. “I’ll fix it later”.
    Never write poor markup or programming and say, “Oh, I’ll fix that later.” That seldom works out well. No, do it right the first time. Every time.
  12. Leaving the content until last.
    Creating structure based on appearance as opposed to the role of the content. Deciding to use a heading element because “the text is big” is the wrong way to go about it. Instead you want to pick a heading element because the content in question is a page or section title/heading.
  13. Making it more complicated than it needs to be.
    Keep it simple. Do a little research, understand the technology you’re working with.
  14. Never concentrate on only one thing.
    A good site needs good concept, writing, design and code. Details are great but you can still care for them when 90% of the work is done. Try to give every aspect of the webpage the time it deserves.
  15. Sticking to your plan — whatever happens.
    Build to scale. Don’t think that your initial plan is all you want to build and end up building it in such a way that you can’t extend it later. Otherwise you’ll be regretting it when you realize you need to add new functionality and you end up having to rewrite a lot of things.
  16. Starting to test your site with IE.

    Make sure that you always start coding for a standards compliant browser. After that you can fix the remaining IE related bugs.

  17. Narrowing your perspective.
    Don’t design looking solely at your enormous über-designer-friendly monitor. Take a look at your design on multiple resolutions right from the very start, so you can keep problems down the line to a bare minimum. Don’t just think about today’s desktop browsers — keep forward compatibility in mind whenever possible (even if that’s just writing clean markup).

Detailed Overview

4. One thing to do before starting a new project

A new client has approached you and would like to offer you a job. How are you going to set everything up? How to start a new project? How to make sure the communication with the client is optimal? What should be done before starting a new project? Experts answer from their own experience.

4.1. Clean your desk and desktop.

  • Clean up your desk. Getting rid of the visual clutter around you will establish an environment where creativity can flourish. [Jesse Bennett-Chamberlain122986]
  • Clean off your desktop. [Mike Davidson152547]
  • Clear everything else off your plate and remove all distractions. Multitasking isn’t as glorious as it’s been made out to be and often just slows things down. Starting a project with a clean slate is key and making the most of your first day can make all the difference. [Matt Brett117558]
  • Cleaning! My desk… the room… the house. I am compulsive cleaner. I often need to do some cleaning before getting into a new project. [Russ Weakley120679]
  • Tidy your desk. [Richard Rutter1406510]

4.2. Improve your personal and professional skills.

  • Get organized.

    Invest time in getting organized. If it’s a client project, I’d add that it’s important to invest some quality time setting expectations and helping them see the inner workings of what the next few weeks or months will be like. [Garrett Dimon1486311]

  • I need to be organized before beginning any new work, so I set-up my project folders, which include folders for client notes, mock-ups, as well as design and code snippets. Then I prep the development site. With those in place, I can typically begin to rapidly develop the project. [Craig Saila1115712]
  • Keep updated about current trends.
  • Refamiliarize yourself with current trends and best-practices. A lot probably happened while your head was down on the last project. React to, don’t blindly follow, trends. Ask yourself, “will those new practices look as perfect tomorrow?” [Shaun Inman1426913]
  • Estimate your capabilities and capacities.
  • It doesn’t matter if it’s a five-page site for your mate’s Dad’s sister’s pony club, or a gargantuan high-profile site for the Prime Minister, always ensure that you have enough time and resources to do the job justice, otherwise you’ll end up cutting corners, pushing back deadlines, and deliver a sub standard experience to the client and the user base. If in doubt, don’t do it. [Simon Collison1356014]Understand what other projects you may not be able to work on because of your new project. [Bill Keaggy15015]
  • Be grateful.
  • I say a mental thank you for the opportunity to be a part the best creative family ever at AgencyNet. We have an incredible team of passionate people and clients who inspire us. Without that, I would be nothing. [Larissa Meek1537316]

4.3. Review the project carefully.

  • Get to know your clients.Research, research, research. By the time you start, you should know their preferred color scheme by heart. [Phil Renaud1449717]
  • Research. [Jason Santa Maria1318118]
  • [Do] Your homework. Learn everything you can about the client, their customers, the competition and the project before making a start. [Andy Budd1087619]
  • Ask questions. A lot. Don’t be afraid of sounding stupid, or being a pain in the butt. It’s better you get a complete grasp of a project before embarking on it. [Mark Boulton1327720]
  • What drives them? What are they passionate about? What can you learn about their business that will help you create their ideal website? Who do they compete with and how can you appeal to their target market? It’s also important to shake their hand if you can. If not, spend 20+ minutes talking with them on the phone.Make sure that you get along, and that you can work well together. Be sure that they are open-minded to your ideas, and that you are a good listener to them. If something’s not right about the relationship in the beginning, don’t be afraid to cut it off and save yourself a great deal of hassle. [Nick Francis1307421]
  • Listen to your clients.
  • Listening to the client. [Wolfgang Bartelme1129022]
  • Really listen to what your clients have to say. Immerse yourself in who the client is and who the visitors are. [Carolyn Wood1028423, Editor in Chief of Digital Web Magazine]
  • Communicate.
  • If the project is for a client then I find communication to be the single most important thing before, during and after a project. Without good communication people worry and problems escalate. [Andy Peatling1378324]
  • The one thing I always do before starting a project is talk to the client. Admittedly we all do that as part of the tender process and kick-off. However, I don’t believe enough of us take the time to do this effectively. We need to get to know the client as well as humanly possible, understand their motivation, their goals and really listen to their responses.We must ensure we incorporate what they have to say into our thinking rather than deciding everything in advance. Effective communication with a client up front can smooth over many difficulties and establish a strong ongoing relationship that will serve you well in both the current and future projects. [Paul Boag1286125]
  • Clearly communicate expectations to everyone involved. You never want to have someone one a project wondering what is expected of them. [D. Keith Robinson1347526]
  • Make sure client’s needs are defined.
  • Get to know what the projects is all about and what the client needs. Not what they want, what they need. The client may think they want “Web 2.0″ when their identity is Art Deco. As a designers it’s up to us to change their mind or make it work. [Jason Beaird1277127]
  • Make sure the scope is defined.
  • Find out exactly what’s involved and work out (in your head, at least) how you’re going to go about delivering. I’ve had a few occasions where this has been an absolute nightmare, trying to juggle your projects amongst others and balance all your other commitments simultaneously. [Oliver Beattie1249228]
  • Make sure the scope is defined and the contract is signed. [Eric A. Meyer1158529]
  • Dive deep into any data you can find to help frame your project. That includes existing product metrics, customer feedback, market landscape, and more. Saturate yourself with context. [Luke Wroblewski1099630]
  • Nail down scope. It needs to be very clear to the client which stages of the project are “fuzzy” and which are “firm.” Brainstorming, vision-casting, call it what you will – that is the time for throwing out new ideas and features. Once development has started, any groundbreaking departures from what has already been agreed upon needs to be drafted up as a separate contract and/or iteration of the project. [Nathan Smith1519331]
  • Make sure the goal is defined.
  • There are many things you should do before starting on the visual design or beginning development, but if I had to pick one thing it would be to specify what the project’s goal is. [Roger Johansson1078032]
  • Talk with the client. Understand their goals. Once you know this, your solutions can target those goals. Without it, it’s hard to defend a design. With it, you can explain how and why your design solves those problems. [Jonathan Snook1198733]
  • Identify, with some precision, just what it is that you hope to derive from your involvement in the project, and confirm that this aim is both realistic and a likely outcome of your effort. [Adam Greenfield]
  • Make sure you have a good plan.
  • Have a solid plan in place for the content. Even if you have no control over it, knowing what it is and how it’s structured will help guide the rest of the process (whether creative or developmental). [Dan Rubin1419534]
  • Plan everything on paper! You don’t have to be too detailed but give yourself a good idea of what you want the finished result to be, whether you are working on a UI design or building a large scale application. Planning on paper helps you stay focused and ensures you won’t forget any of your ideas as you dive into the work. [Christian Montoya1398935]
  • You don’t have to come up with a rigid schedule, but identifying key milestones, and what steps you need to do to complete them BEFORE you start will help keep you on track, and can often keep the proverbial “light at the end of the tunnel” always in view. [Steve Smith1055336]
  • Affirm the vision for the project.Probably not the answer you’re looking for, but one of the best things to do before starting a project is review and affirmation of the vision for the project (with the stakeholders). Often objectives summaries and punch lists aren’t enough, even a seminal vision should be reviewed in a casual brainstorming session to be sure that the initial steps taken are going to be productive and adversity averted. [Frederick Townes1389437]
  • Observe the competition.
  • Look at the competition. You don’t want to reinvent the wheel. But more importantly, you want to learn from the mistakes of your competition, even if you’re not out to make a buck on whatever it is you’re creating. Find out what they did right, what they did wrong, and what they didn’t do at all. [Patrick Haney1067938]
  • Get money up front.
  • Determine scope, put the scope in writing, and get money up front. Did I say get money up front? No matter how small you are, the client should respect you enough to pay you to get started. [Ryan Masuga1186839]
  • Make sure you get paid 50% beforehand. [Oliver Reichenstein1565840, Informationarchitects.jp]
  • Simple, prepayment! [Veerle Pieters1338641]
  • Clear your mind.
  • If feasible, finish up previous projects or at least major milestones before starting a new project. This will help take any pressure off and clear your mind. [Ian Main1555942]
  • Go out and spend the advance. [Cameron Adams1236643, Themaninblue.com]
  • Clear your mind, take a break and think! [Lucian Slatineanu1039944]
  • Brainstorm, sketch!
  • Write down as many random ideas and sketches as you can on pieces of paper. Nothing has to make sense or have any real value — but just get the ideas out on paper. Later on during the project, you can reference this idea-bin when you’re stuck on what to do next. [Kyle Neath1109145, Warpspire.com]
  • Sketch! Don’t go straight into Photoshop/Illustrator/whatever. Sketch, sketch, sketch, sketch, sketch. [Jina Bolton1147246]
  • Sketch! Don’t take for granted the tactile benefits of drawing and erasing. It’s the fastest brainstorming session and revision cycle you’ll ever experience. [Daniel Mall1046447]
  • Discuss your decisions.
  • Argue with my partner. Half-kidding. Bounce off your ideas with someone who has a keen critical sense. Research till you drop. Get as much collateral information about the market, similar projects. Clarify the brief till there are NO gray zone, because this will become your twilight zone.
  • Write down everything you’re pretty sure is solved conceptually, work out the flow.. and start playing. I create master files which comprise of directories loaded with bits and pieces I’ve fetched in our design archives that might be of use. Make loads of screenshots of others work in a single .psd file to remember what I liked, or think could work. [Carole Guevin1585648, Netdiver.net]
  • Test your decisions.
  • User testing, of the old site if one exists, and also of 3-4 competing services, chosen to span as broad a diversity in design approaches as possible. [Jakob Nielsen1577849]
  • Pray the client likes my work.
  • [Meryl K. Evans14610050]

4.4. Simply get started!

  • Nothing.
  • Nothing. Just start. I sometimes come back from a meeting, sit down, open Photoshop and just play around with the companies logo, colors and typography. Even if it leads me nowhere and i have to go back and start from scratch, i think that these few hours after a meeting when everything is fresh in your mind are perfect for drawing some scribbles. Sometimes it leads to fresh unique designs, you couldn’t have done after reading pages and pages of project-infos. [Markus Stefan1138851]
  • Nothing. Just do it. This is what we do and it should require no special preparation beyond those specific to the project at hand. [Andy Rutledge1018252]

5. One common mistake you should always avoid developing web-sites.

To maximize the outcome of your efforts and guarantee optimal results for both sides – your and your client’s – you need to work quickly and you need to make as few mistakes as possible. Let’s take a look at the overview of the most common mistakes you should avoid developing web-sites.

5.1. Basic mistakes.

  • Mistake: Starting with a wrong approach.
  • Fitting an idea into a design or a CMS. I find way too many shops that start designing and choosing a CMS before they have hammered down IA, content, and complete page descriptions. The design should always come from the goals and needs. And the platform should meet those same needs exactly, ideally without any more or less. [Steve Smith1055336]
  • You should never assume clients have the same goals as you or each other. Each job is different and the more work you can put in up front discovering and distilling these goals before any work is done, the less work you’ll end up doing. [Mike Davidson152547]
  • Not setting aside time for communication. At least an hour out of your day should be dedicated to email, IM, phone – however you communicate with your clients. And not just your current client, either. Previous clients may get in touch periodically with questions or small tasks they need taken care of which can quickly add up and pile on extra hours to your work week. [Matt Brett117558]
  • Battling between the marketing agenda, the designers visual comps that don’t afford room for flexibility and the backenders who want to implement the latest techno widgets or apps. Overall, ignorance is the greatest mistake. Today, the core nature of technology induced user interactivity is possible by the collaboration of the multi-disciplinarians that need all to input to deliver the best outcome. [Carole Guevin1585648, Netdiver.net]
  • Mistake: Designing before planning.
  • Building the design before planning the structure of the HTML templates can too often result in last-minute hacks. With a solidly semantic HTML template — inspired by the content — the presentation and behavioral layer can mold to any design it needs to. [Craig Saila1115712]
  • Mistake: Thinking that at some point you’re done.
  • Successful websites are organic. You are never done. [Oliver Reichenstein1565840, Informationarchitects.jp]

5.2. Mistakes while getting started.

  • Mistake: Rushing in.
  • Don’t dive straight in. Before you start seeking inspiration or opening Photoshop grad a notepad and simply jot down what ever is on your mind about the website. You might find staying away from the computer during this initial phase may clear your mind and bring individual and unique ideas to the forefront. [Ian Main1555942]
  • Rushing in. Just do not rush it. Construction workers never start building a skyscraper without having the ground surveyed, blueprints drawn up, and some level of research into what the people using the building will need or want. The web is the same. Plan, plan, and do some more planning. We spend up to 50% of project time away from the computer, knee-deep in research, analysis and sketching things out. Once we finally start building, we have the confidence to work fast and thoroughly. [Simon Collison1356014]
  • The most common mistake I see is web designers rushing into production. The ink is barely dry on the contract and already they are opening Photoshop and editing code. Not enough time is given to laying the ground work. A good web designer needs to understand the context of the project. Why is the site being built? Who is the target audience? What call to action do you want them to complete? Who are the competition? How is the sites success going to be judged? Having all of this information at your fingertips makes the design and development stages so much easier because many of the hard decisions are made for you if you know the background. [Paul Boag1286125]
  • Mistake: Having a print mentality.
  • A web page isn’t a piece of paper, and accommodating different font sizes, or even different window sizes (or different media!) is a brilliant, powerful feature of the web. [Patrick Griffiths14762, HTMLDog.com]
  • Mistake: Not accounting for unknowns.
  • Schedules change. Availability changes. Things happen. This kind of gets back to organization. Good planning is difficult and takes a significant amount of time. [Garrett Dimon1486311]
  • Mistake: Not planning up front.
  • Plan ahead. There are few things more frustrating than starting down a path then realizing that all your work has been a waste of time. [Daniel Mall1046447]
  • Whittle down ideas and functionality to be relevant, simple and consistent. [Richard Rutter1406510]
  • Thinking about the results before you’ve done the process. Don’t just spit out a site that fits the CMS template. [Cameron Adams1236643, Themaninblue.com]
  • Mistake: Assuming that any project will be “straight-forward”.
  • Every project has issues of one kind or another to overcome. While many issues can be avoided through good planning, there will always be unexpected “surprises”. [Russ Weakley120679]
  • Mistake: Copying ideas.
  • Looking too much at other sites to determine what the design should look like, instead of thinking about the specific needs of the site on which you’re working. I recently heard Zeldman say “It’s not the pixels, it’s the idea.” If you’re doing a site about dirt, there might not be a compelling reason to put shiny rounded-corner gradient things on there, just because everyone else that you see on CSS Mania is doing that. [Ryan Masuga1186839]
  • Don’t worry about what the other guy is doing. Think for yourself. If all social networking sites had the same features and design, what would be the point of having more than one? [Shaun Inman1426913]
  • Don’t steal someone else’s work. Being a copycat is the fastest way to earn yourself a scarlet letter in the design community. If you want to emulate good design, follow Cameron Moll’s advice and “copy the inspiration, not the outcome.” From “Good Designers Copy, Great Designers Steal70“. [Jason Beaird1277127]
  • Mistake: Copying yourself.
  • Don’t settle with what’s comfortable, or try to force a style on yourself. This goes for fonts, colors, techniques… try to do something different every time. If you have a distinct style, it’s going to come through anyway, without having to force it. [Jina Bolton1147246]
  • Don’t play it safe. Good design takes risks and makes people feel… something. [Larissa Meek1537316]
  • Shortcuts. This applies to design and code. I don’t care if the client will never notice the subtle gradients or appreciate the beautiful semantic code. Just make sure it’s something you can get excited about, and that you can learn something on each project.There’s simply too much talent out there to ever think you know it all, so do things in your everyday work that are incredibly challenging and uncomfortable. That’s the only way to keep getting better. Don’t hesitate to spend much more time on a project solely for the purpose of becoming better. It’s worth it![Nick Francis1307421]

5.3. Mistakes in the design phase.

  • Mistake: Putting yourself or/and your clients first.
  • You never want to assume your own goals and behaviors match up with those of your audience. Knowing your audiences is key. [D. Keith Robinson1347526]
  • So many companies allow the user interface to be determined by the back-end, rather than the other way around. This is understandable as it’s the path of least resistance. However it doesn’t provide a particularly good experience for your users. The best sites always focus on the needs of the user and are designed from the outside in. [Andy Budd1087619]
  • Not putting yourself in the users shoes. How ever you do that — persona development, reading research, user testing — you must always try and understand how a real person is going to use the website. [Mark Boulton1327720]
  • Believing that it’s important what you personally like or what your client personally likes. You are both very different from the target audience. [Jakob Nielsen1577849]
  • Don’t design for you, design for the target audience. Seriously. It’s easy to become attached to the thing you’re working on and forget that you’re not the person it’s intended for. Remember the user. [Patrick Haney1067938]
  • Designing or developing for yourself or for your client instead of for your client’s visitors. I’ve seen so many failed websites that completely ignore the end user and instead pander to the creative whims of the designer, developer, or client. [Roger Johansson1078032]
  • Putting yourself before the client’s needs. [Jason Santa Maria1318118]
  • Mistake: “I’ll fix it later”.
  • Never write poor markup or programming and say, “Oh, I’ll fix that later.” That seldom works out well. No, do it right the first time. Every time. [Andy Rutledge1018252]
  • “I’ll do it like this now, and come back and fix it up later”. I’ve fallen into that trap a few times, and you’ll never end up going back. Even if it takes a little more time, do things the best you can first time. [Andy Peatling1378324]
  • Mistake: Leaving the content until last.
  • Don’t leave the content until last, as some sort of “filler.” We hear all the time that Content is King on the web. No, it isn’t. It’s the Cleaning Lady of the Web, brought in after the party is pretty much over. I’m so often told: “Here’s a space; fill it with something about what we’re all about—something that will grab people,” and the expectation is that I’ll determine the content based on how much space there is, and place it where it just happened to fit in the “design.” Give it the respect it deserves. [Carolyn Wood1028423, Editor in Chief of Digital Web Magazine]
  • Creating structure based on appearance as opposed to the role of the content. Deciding to use a heading element because “the text is big” is the wrong way to go about it. Instead you want to pick a heading element because the content in question is a page or section title/heading. [Eric A. Meyer1158529]
  • Try to get as much information as possible about what content needs to be on the page before starting. It’s not uncommon to start something and a client later in the process decides things need to be added thus creating more work and problems. This can be easily avoided by using a questionnaire to probe what the client wants. Nothing is more frustrating than working with no information or guidelines. [Veerle Pieters1338641]
  • Mistake: Making it more complicated than it needs to be.
  • When I first learned how to program, I always took really complicated approaches to solving problems only to discover a function already existed that solved my problem. Do a little research, understand the technology you’re working with. [Jonathan Snook1198733]
  • Mistake: Never concentrate on only one thing.
  • A good site needs good concept, writing, design and code. Details are great but you can still care for them when 90% of the work is done. Try to give every aspect of the webpage the time it deserves. [Markus Stefan1138851]
  • Mistake: Sticking to your plan — whatever happens.
  • Build to scale. Don’t think that your initial plan is all you want to build and end up building it in such a way that you can’t extend it later. Otherwise you’ll be regretting it when you realize you need to add new functionality and you end up having to rewrite a lot of things. [Christian Montoya1398935]

5.4. Mistakes in the release phase.

  • Mistake: Starting to test your site with IE.
  • Make sure that you always start coding for a standards compliant browser. After that you can fix the remaining IE related bugs. [Wolfgang Bartelme1129022]
  • Mistake: Narrowing your perspective.
  • Designing for your equipment. Computers vary between font-rendering, gamma levels, screen resolutions, and color calibration. Go look at your design on a crappy computer without anti-aliasing and then decide whether it still looks good. [Kyle Neath1109145, Warpspire.com]
  • Don’t design looking solely at your enormous über-designer-friendly monitor. Take a look at your design on multiple resolutions right from the very start, so you can keep problems down the line to a bare minimum. [Oliver Beattie1249228]
  • You need to think beyond the canvas. One of the common mistakes is to design a comp, but assume it ends there. How will the site look in a larger monitor? Will your background images repeat correctly? I think we get so obsessed with designing “above the fold” that designs don’t have room to breathe. [Nathan Smith1519331]
  • The most common mistake is ignoring the audiences (or requirements). In other words, often a design satisfies all but one of the requirements the designer was unwilling to compromise on some specific point in order to reach the result they wanted. Often this is a mistake because if the requirements are in fact based on real business needs, the project as a whole will be unsuccessful over the long term. [Frederick Townes1389437]
  • Don’t just think about today’s desktop browsers — keep forward compatibility in mind whenever possible (even if that’s just writing clean markup). [Dan Rubin1419534]

5.3. Technical mistakes.

  • Letting an internal perspective dictate an external experience.
  • Let me explain with an example.For just about every Web service there is a data structure that represents “users”. In order to uniquely identify each customer, this data structure may require a unique ID, a full name, a password, an address, a birth date, and an email. Some of these may be legal restrictions. Some may be required for communication between the customer and the organization. But all of them are added as fields in the data structure. When a new customer comes to try out the service and has to register, these fields are simply displayed to them as a Web form.The problem is when exploring a new product or service, most people don’t think of themselves as an object in a database. They are much more responsive to personal connections or progressive engagement that makes them feel welcome.Instead their first impression with the service is dictated by an internal data structure. Not a great experience. [Luke Wroblewski1099630]
  • Using an autocomplete-enabled text editor.
  • Having your hand held is great in the early going, but in the long run, if you get too used to it, it restricts your ability to grow. [Phil Renaud1449717]
  • Putting too many options on the home page.
  • I’ve found this to be a common struggle when dealing with larger organizations that have several internal departments all fighting for prominent placement. The end result is often an overwhelming and cluttered mess which doesn’t reflect well on the organization as a whole. [Jesse Bennett-Chamberlain122986]
  • Forgetting to design error pages.
  • [Lucian Slatineanu1039944]
  • Using gray text for content on a light background.
  • Reading gray text on white is akin to driving in foggy weather. That’s why black is boring — because it works. [Meryl K. Evans14610050]

6. One tool or/and service/web-service I can’t imagine my life without

A choice of a useful tool for your workflow isn’t an easy task — mostly it requires both experience and time you don’t always have, although you should. Some of the most useful web-tools, services, devices and applications world’s leading web-developers can’t live without.

6.1. One device I can’t live without

  • Pen and paper.
  • Pen and paper. Nothing else even comes close. [Andy Rutledge1018252]
  • Pen and paper, carefully chosen. I guess I’m an old-fashioned girl. [Carolyn Wood1028423, Editor in Chief of Digital Web Magazine]
  • Pencil & paper. [Lucian Slatineanu1039944]
  • The Whiteboard.
  • The whiteboard. I’ve seen more problems solved by drawing on a whiteboard than in hundreds of thousands of pages of documentation. [Daniel Mall1046447]
  • Mac.
  • My tools of choice on a day to day basis: MacBook Pro 15″, TextMate, Fireworks, Apple Mail, Safari, iPhone, iTunes, and iTerm. [Steve Smith1055336]
  • My Mac has been my design savior. I look back on the days when I was a Windows user and wonder how I got anything done. Between the wonderful OS, the great design/development tools, and the the love I have for the computer I use every single day, I don’t know if I would’ve made it this far without it. [Patrick Haney1067938]
  • My Mac. [Roger Johansson1078032]
  • My Mac. Life would suck if I had to work on a PC every day :-) [Andy Budd1087619]
  • Has to be my Apple laptop. It’s how I bring my business and personal life with me across the globe. [Luke Wroblewski1099630]

6.2. One application I can’t live without

  • Firebug.
  • Firebug, hands down. It’s like learning a new language for the web. [Kyle Neath1109145, Warpspire.com]
  • Joel Hewitt’s Firefox add-on Firebug has completely changed the way I develop CSS and JavaScript intensive Web site by allowing real-time testing and debugging of sites. It’s almost made cross-domain Ajax development enjoyable. [Craig Saila1115712]
  • Adobe Photoshop / Adobe Creative Suite.
  • Adobe Photoshop. [Wolfgang Bartelme1129022]
  • That would have to be Photoshop or maybe even my coffee machine. [Markus Stefan1138851]
  • Adobe Creative Suite. I love love love it. I am constantly using Photoshop, Illustrator, and/or InDesign. [Jina Bolton1147246]
  • Firefox.
  • Firefox with extensions (Web Developer Toolbar Firebug, Operator, etc.). [Eric A. Meyer1158529]
  • CSS-Coding: CSS Edit.
  • I absolutely love CSSEdit 2116. I never anticipated an app speeding up a process as much as CSSEdit has. Along with the productivity boost, it’s also really made things more fun and removed a lot of unnecessary stress normally incurred while debugging. [Matt Brett117558]
  • I’d say CSS Edit. I used to do everything in Textmate, but now I do all my CSS in CSSEdit, and leave everything else to Textmate. Over the last couple months I’ve really started to see how it can help speed up my workflow when styling. Especially on the site I was just working on that used a cart system which nested tables five deep (and gutting the templates wasn’t an option, unfortunately…). CSSEdit really helped target the right elements to style much quicker than I could have otherwise. [Ryan Masuga1186839]
  • Text Editor: Ultraedit.
  • Ultraedit. Everyone has their editor of choice and Ultraedit is the one I keep going back to. It’s fast and lightweight and while it doesn’t have all the features I’d like, it has become like an old friend. [Jonathan Snook1198733]
  • Text Editor: BBEdit.
  • BBEdit. Simple, effective. All I really need. [Russ Weakley120679]
  • HTML Generator: Freeway.
  • I’m going to say Freeway121. It’s not a tool that I use any longer, but without it, I never would have gotten into web design. I truly owe my career to that application. [Jesse Bennett-Chamberlain122986]
  • Terminal.
  • Terminal. All power stems from the terminal. If you don’t know how to use the command line — no matter who you are or what you do — you probably shouldn’t be doing web development. [Cameron Adams1236643, Themaninblue.com]
  • Web Framework: Django.
  • I already plugged this one, but Django. It’s a fabulous web framework and it’s every bit as fantastic as it claims to be. In fact, if anything, it’s definitely under-hyped. Take a look at it, you’ll more than likely be more-or-less glued to it, given a month or two! [Oliver Beattie1249228]
  • JavaScript Library: jQuery.
  • There are a lot of tools/services/software that I couldn’t do my job without. Thanks to some prodding from Nathan Smith125, I’ve been having a lot of fun with jQuery lately. I’m looking forward to tinkering with the Blueprint CSS Framework126. There’s a lot of talk about Blueprint right now and it looks like a very promising framework. [Jason Beaird1277127]
  • Organization tool: iGTD.
  • In many ways I am a typical designer. I am horrible disorganised and incredibly forgetful. If I was left to my own devices I would stumble through life from one crisis to the next. For years that is exactly how I lived until I read “Getting Things Done” by David Allen. I know this is an incredibly over hyped book but its methodology has proved incredibly useful to me in organising both my work and home life. It ensuring my work gets done in the most efficient manner possible. In particular I use an open source tool for the mac called iGTD that allows me to organise all of my many tasks. It is built on GTD principles and has proved absolutely invaluable to me. If I had to wipe my hard drive and keep only one application that would be it. [Paul Boag1286125]
  • iGTD129, from Bartek Bargiel. Unbelievable. [Nick Francis1307421]

6.3. One web-application I can’t live without

  • Backpack.
  • Backpack. I think it knows me better than I know myself. [Jason Santa Maria1318118]
  • Backpack (with Basecamp following shortly behind). Seriously, I’d be lost without either of them. [Mark Boulton1327720]
  • Illustrator/Basecamp + I have to admit Flickr, to serve as my daily distraction :) [Veerle Pieters1338641]
  • Basecamp.
  • Basecamp. I use it every day. [D. Keith Robinson1347526]
  • Boring answer, but it is Basecamp. Running a small business and twenty projects at any one time, I need Basecamp and I need it badly. Clients get it, the team get it, and I love it. My number one… always. Open my browser and you can guarantee I’ll open Basecamp in the first tab. [Simon Collison1356014]
  • Online Invoicing: Blinksale.
  • Blinksale136 for online invoicing. It is so simple and really takes the hassle out of billing. I can’t imagine handling invoices manually ever again. [Andy Peatling1378324]
  • Design Collaboration Tool: Conceptshare.
  • Next to Google and the various blogs that it searches to help us troubleshoot or do research, the next best tool is Conceptshare. It does a great job of allowing multiple stakeholders to constructively contribute to the creative process and make sure that all of that input is documented and preserved online. I highly recommend the use of conceptshare even for internal creative work. [Frederick Townes1389437]
  • Weblog-Engine: WordPress.
  • WordPress. It offers a ton of features for building many different kinds of sites, but more importantly, it makes template designing incredibly easy. I use it for all my blogs. [Christian Montoya1398935]
  • Flickr.
  • Flickr. It’s may number one way of keeping in touch with friends and family around the world. [Richard Rutter1406510]
  • I give equal time here to Flickr and Twitter – both web apps form a whole that represents what all my friends are doing from day to day: one visually, one in tidy little written snippets. They allow me a daily glimpse into lives of people I care about but are too far away to see in person on a regular basis, and that’s invaluable to me. [Dan Rubin1419534]
  • Web Analytics: Mint.
  • Honestly, and not as a sales pitch, Mint. I’ve lived with it for the past two years, everyday. Designing, developing, using, supporting (it helps that it pays the bills too). Without it I’d have this giant gaping hole where the past two years were. [Shaun Inman1426913]
  • Mint143. Keeps me balanced. [Phil Renaud1449717]
  • Instant Messenger.
  • Instant messenger. It gives my clients a way to communicate directly with me without going through a relay service145. [Meryl K. Evans14610050]
  • Word processor.
  • A good word processor. As well as basic planning, outlines, and note taking I’ll run most of my web content through one first to easily edit and pick up on grammar and spelling problems. [Patrick Griffiths14762, HTMLDog.com]

6.4. One web-site I can’t live without

  • Amazon.
  • Well, there’s all the typical answers. (Basecamp, Writeboard, etc.) So, in the interest of avoiding the boring answers, I’d say Amazon. The ability to read a plethora of reviews about books and find new and interesting books about information design, writing, development, and everything else has really helped me expose myself to new ideas and content. It’s a source of inspiration that never runs dry. [Garrett Dimon1486311]
  • Del.icio.us.
  • I love Del.icio.us149 in a huge way. [Bill Keaggy15015]
  • GMail.
  • Gmail. It’s what I’m typing in right now! TextMate too. It’s an awesome code editor. For graphics, it’s definitely Fireworks, all the way. For doing diagrams, nothing beats OmniGraffle. [Nathan Smith1519331]
  • Wikipedia.
  • Wikipedia. [Adam Geenfield]
  • Newsvine.
  • Newsvine of course. After that, I’d say Bloglines, Adium, Photoshop, and Illustrator. [Mike Davidson152547]
  • Stock images: iStockPhoto.
  • iStockPhoto is my best friend full of endless inspiration. [Larissa Meek1537316]

6.5. One more thing I can’t live without

  • Shortcut keys.
  • Learning to fast-track certain processes via keyboard shortcuts saves countless amounts of time and increases productivity. Trevor Morris Photographics has a great keyboard shortcuts print out resource154 for Photoshop. [Ian Main1555942]
  • Agile programming
  • Not a tool actually, but a method. [Oliver Reichenstein1565840, Informationarchitects.jp]
  • Web-wide search.
  • This answer has been the same since Webcrawler was launched, even though the preferred search engine has changed a few times. It can change again. [Jakob Nielsen1577849]
  • The Open Source Community.
  • Way over all the widgets assembled, it’s the people, that web community of enthusiasts that gets my top vote and recognition. Most of us wanted to ditch the business as usual syndrome and reinvent upon the basis of true democracy. Without them, we do not exist.The Open Source community by which we enjoy so many robust and free applications. Hats off to Linus Torvalds and all the others we all owe you for LAMP!Complimenting this, newer Logitech mouses (MX Rev or VX Rev (for laptops) have a one click button to open a search engine window of your choice, not withstanding, that you can highlight a portion of text in any document click the search button and that ’string’ will be searched automatically.That’s pretty awesome! [Carole Guevin1585648, Netdiver.net]

Footnotes

  1. 1 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/09/05/50-designers-x-6-questions/
  2. 2 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/05/10/70-expert-ideas-for-better-css-coding/
  3. 3 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/04/20/35-designers-x-5-questions/
  4. 4 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/09/04/40-books-for-professional-design-development/
  5. 5 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/09/06/smashing-1st-anniversary-giveaway/
  6. 6 http://www.31three.com
  7. 7 http://www.mikeindustries.com
  8. 8 http://mattbrett.com
  9. 9 http://maxdesign.com.au
  10. 10 http://www.clagnut.com
  11. 11 http://www.garrettdimon.com
  12. 12 http://www.saila.com
  13. 13 http://www.shauninman.com
  14. 14 http://www.collylogic.com
  15. 15 http://www.keaggy.com
  16. 16 http://www.larissameek.com
  17. 17 http://philrenaud.com
  18. 18 http://www.jasonsantamaria.com
  19. 19 http://www.andybudd.com
  20. 20 http://markboulton.co.uk
  21. 21 http://www.project83.com
  22. 22 http://www.bartelme.at
  23. 23 http://www.digital-web.com
  24. 24 http://www.blazenewmedia.com
  25. 25 http://www.boagworld.com
  26. 26 http://www.dkeithrobinson.com
  27. 27 http://www.jasongraphix.com
  28. 28 http://www.obeattie.com
  29. 29 http://www.meyerweb.com
  30. 30 http://www.lukew.com
  31. 31 http://www.sonspring.com
  32. 32 http://www.456bereastreet.com
  33. 33 http://www.snook.ca
  34. 34 http://www.superfluousbanter.org
  35. 35 http://www.christianmontoya.com
  36. 36 http://www.orderedlist.com
  37. 37 http://www.w3-edge.com
  38. 38 http://www.patrickhaney.com
  39. 39 http://www.masugadesign.com
  40. 40 http://www.informationarchitects.jp
  41. 41 http://veerle.duoh.com
  42. 42 http://www.e-lusion.com
  43. 43 http://www.themaninblue.com
  44. 44 http://www.badboy.ro
  45. 45 http://www.warpspire.com
  46. 46 http://www.jinabolton.com
  47. 47 http://www.danielmall.com
  48. 48 http://netdiver.net/
  49. 49 http://www.useit.com
  50. 50 http://www.meryl.net
  51. 51 http://www.mstefan.com
  52. 52 http://www.andyrutledge.com
  53. 53 http://www.orderedlist.com
  54. 54 http://www.mikeindustries.com
  55. 55 http://mattbrett.com
  56. 56 http://netdiver.net/
  57. 57 http://www.saila.com
  58. 58 http://www.informationarchitects.jp
  59. 59 http://www.e-lusion.com
  60. 60 http://www.collylogic.com
  61. 61 http://www.boagworld.com
  62. 62 http://www.htmldog.com
  63. 63 http://www.garrettdimon.com
  64. 64 http://www.danielmall.com
  65. 65 http://www.clagnut.com
  66. 66 http://www.themaninblue.com
  67. 67 http://maxdesign.com.au
  68. 68 http://www.masugadesign.com
  69. 69 http://www.shauninman.com
  70. 70 http://www.sitepoint.com/article/copy-great-designers-steal/
  71. 71 http://www.jasongraphix.com
  72. 72 http://www.jinabolton.com
  73. 73 http://www.larissameek.com
  74. 74 http://www.project83.com
  75. 75 http://www.dkeithrobinson.com
  76. 76 http://www.andybudd.com
  77. 77 http://markboulton.co.uk
  78. 78 http://www.useit.com
  79. 79 http://www.patrickhaney.com
  80. 80 http://www.456bereastreet.com
  81. 81 http://www.jasonsantamaria.com
  82. 82 http://www.andyrutledge.com
  83. 83 http://www.blazenewmedia.com
  84. 84 http://www.digital-web.com
  85. 85 http://www.meyerweb.com
  86. 86 http://veerle.duoh.com
  87. 87 http://www.snook.ca
  88. 88 http://www.mstefan.com
  89. 89 http://www.christianmontoya.com
  90. 90 http://www.bartelme.at
  91. 91 http://www.warpspire.com
  92. 92 http://www.obeattie.com
  93. 93 http://www.sonspring.com
  94. 94 http://www.w3-edge.com
  95. 95 http://www.superfluousbanter.org
  96. 96 http://www.lukew.com
  97. 97 http://philrenaud.com
  98. 98 http://www.31three.com
  99. 99 http://www.badboy.ro
  100. 100 http://www.meryl.net
  101. 101 http://www.andyrutledge.com
  102. 102 http://www.digital-web.com
  103. 103 http://www.badboy.ro
  104. 104 http://www.danielmall.com
  105. 105 http://www.orderedlist.com
  106. 106 http://www.patrickhaney.com
  107. 107 http://www.456bereastreet.com
  108. 108 http://www.andybudd.com
  109. 109 http://www.lukew.com
  110. 110 http://www.warpspire.com
  111. 111 http://www.saila.com
  112. 112 http://www.bartelme.at
  113. 113 http://www.mstefan.com
  114. 114 http://www.jinabolton.com
  115. 115 http://www.meyerweb.com
  116. 116 http://macrabbit.com/cssedit/
  117. 117 http://mattbrett.com
  118. 118 http://www.masugadesign.com
  119. 119 http://www.snook.ca
  120. 120 http://maxdesign.com.au
  121. 121 http://www.softpress.com/products/index.php
  122. 122 http://www.31three.com
  123. 123 http://www.themaninblue.com
  124. 124 http://www.obeattie.com
  125. 125 http://sonspring.com
  126. 126 http://bjorkoy.com/blueprint/
  127. 127 http://www.jasongraphix.com
  128. 128 http://www.boagworld.com
  129. 129 http://www.igtd.pl/iGTD/
  130. 130 http://www.project83.com
  131. 131 http://www.jasonsantamaria.com
  132. 132 http://markboulton.co.uk
  133. 133 http://veerle.duoh.com
  134. 134 http://www.dkeithrobinson.com
  135. 135 http://www.collylogic.com
  136. 136 http://www.blinksale.com
  137. 137 http://www.blazenewmedia.com
  138. 138 http://www.w3-edge.com
  139. 139 http://www.christianmontoya.com
  140. 140 http://www.clagnut.com
  141. 141 http://www.superfluousbanter.org
  142. 142 http://www.shauninman.com
  143. 143 http://haveamint.com
  144. 144 http://philrenaud.com
  145. 145 http://www.meryl.net/ci/archives/005138.html
  146. 146 http://www.meryl.net
  147. 147 http://www.htmldog.com
  148. 148 http://www.garrettdimon.com
  149. 149 http://del.icio.us
  150. 150 http://www.keaggy.com
  151. 151 http://www.sonspring.com
  152. 152 http://www.mikeindustries.com
  153. 153 http://www.larissameek.com
  154. 154 http://morris-photographics.com/photoshop/shortcuts/index.html
  155. 155 http://www.e-lusion.com
  156. 156 http://www.informationarchitects.jp
  157. 157 http://www.useit.com
  158. 158 http://netdiver.net/

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Vitaly Friedman loves beautiful content and doesn’t like to give in easily. Vitaly is writer, speaker, author and editor-in-chief of Smashing Magazine. He runs responsive Web design workshops and loves solving complex problems in large companies. Get in touch.

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  1. 1

    Great post – re-confirming approaches/ideas and services i already use.

    A good insight into how we designers work

    Good job SM

    LT

    0
  2. 2

    Always good to learn what the gurus are using. Great Post!!!

    0
  3. 3

    Good stuff, as always!

    0
  4. 4

    Some great advice, especially in 4.3.
    I now need a few minutes to recover from information overload.
    Thanks SM.

    0
  5. 5

    Great Article.

    It is interesting to hear from the mouths of the experts. I think that this type of article really helps people re-examine how and why they are working a certain way. Often times it is a small gem of advice that helps transform the reason and way people work.
    cheers
    scott

    0
  6. 6

    I’m a developer. I love design, which is why I come to smashing magazine daily. I was quite a bit disappointed with a lot of the suggestions from these “World Leading Developers”. I realize they are all design oriented, but I think it might have been slightly more beneficial for the horde of amazing designers here to see genuine insight into how a developer does it.

    I am by no means a world leading or famous developer, but here is how I would answer them:

    * What is one typical myth about web-development (which is not true)?
    You need to fully understand a programming language to use it. Just like any language you may speak to another human, ape, dog, or car with, it doesn’t so much matter what exactly you say, but how you say it and present it. If my dog doesn’t understand ball, I don’t go looking for a better way to define ball to him. I walk over, pick up an example of, and show it off or use it.

    * What is one bulletproof method to get over creativity block?
    Sleep. Closing your mind. When you force yourself to stop thinking about it, it’s the same moment your subconscious will wake up and think about it. If your really into doing web design/development, it will be on your mind all the time anyways so why bother forcing what comes naturally.

    * What is one thing you wish you knew before you’ve started programming/designing/… ?
    I approach most situations with the attitude that no one is going to help me so unless I get it entirely done by myself, no one will do it. However when you get in touch with some great minds early on when your learning, you can pick up how to do this stuff much faster. Being self taught isn’t as impressive as it sounds. It’s a handicap, it means I wasn’t able to gain from the benefit of learning from someone else’s mistakes. I make up for this by teaching other people. You’d be surprised at the ideas people that don’t know a think about web developing will suggest when your teaching them.

    * What is one thing to do before starting a new project?
    Sort through code database. I keep every line of every code for each project I’ve ever done. Sometimes I find a better way to do a function, or improve something I did before. It’s nice to have my own library that I can use and I’m more than just familiar with from learning. It’s something I’ve built up over time as a collection of things I tend to use or want to use a lot. It also speeds my time up on a new project to know exactly where to look for everything when I need it.

    * What is one common mistake you should always avoid developing web-sites?
    Lack of comments in your code, and keeping track of how organized the code is. Clean it every spare moment you get. If you ever notice an idea that may make it easier to manage a site later on, take the time to do it now. It may delay the project another day or a few hours, but it’s incredibly valuable to separate similar functions in a file together now than to later on need to cut copy and paste out of one file to make a new one and re-edit 20-40 dynamic files.

    * What is one device/tool or/and service you can’t imagine your life without?
    Calculator and the online documents for the language I’m currently working with. I love my paper copy books, but it’s incredible how great the ability to search for a specific thing about a language can be when your in the middle of a burst of development excitement.

    0
  7. 7

    niceone. intresting stuff.

    0
  8. 8

    Have you ever thought about making some of your lists shorter? Am I the only one who gets put off when seeing really big numbers in headings?

    0
  9. 9

    100% True. I’ve learned so many of these things the hard way. I only wished I hard been told this information before I even got started.

    0
  10. 10

    Wow, great job here! Awesome article! :o)

    0
  11. 11

    Some of these I already knew but rest of it was great tips.

    0
  12. 12

    Rajaraman ramanujam

    September 7, 2007 3:11 pm

    its really nice answers keep it up

    0
  13. 13

    Very interesting tips.

    0
  14. 14

    Great list dude!
    Tanks…

    0
  15. 15

    nice!!

    0
  16. 16

    I don’t get it: same article as “50 Designers x 6 questions” few days ago… What’s the point here?

    0
  17. 17

    Awesome posting.. Great Resources.. any one can learn basics about web designing and developing from this post.. Great work.. Keep it up!!!.. I enjoy your smashing more than any other site….

    0
  18. 18

    That is one big article.

    0
  19. 19

    This one rocks! Thanks.

    0
  20. 20

    Killer article! Thanks!

    –J

    0
  21. 21

    great post !! thnx a lott !!!

    0
  22. 22

    I found Smashing Magazine a month ago and it’s beed propably the best find of last 6 mo.

    Inspiring article..

    0
  23. 23

    wow this really opened my eyes up to loasd of design and development ideas, cheers people!

    0
  24. 24

    I like the idea of this article but come on, why would I need the “World’s leading developers” (says who anyway) to tell me to listen to my clients, plan projects ahead or clean my desk?

    The more I read this the more I get itches over my body:

    Expert Idea From World’s Leading Developers: “Make a good plan”

    or how about “Be grateful” gimme a freaking break

    0
  25. 25

    You guys are not the technics, but only the marketing funny people, that’s why I don’t even respect you nor “your” ideas.

    // And do not forget to add more advertisements next time

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  26. 26

    I love these articles on how other professionals do it!

    Will there be a PDF on this article? Or a printable version?

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  27. 27

    Why does your print.css have such enormous line-height? I get about 2 paragraphs on each page for this article, resulting in 25 pieces of paper. I’m not going to kill a whole tree for this (and I want to read this article on the train). I think a good example is newyorker.com… their print pages are excellent. Can’t Smashing do something more reasonable like that?

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  28. 28

    What if one day you can live in a storm house concepted out of plastic rubber and can save life in wake of extreme storm weathers thiers more .

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  29. 29

    Thanks for this awesome info. =]

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  30. 30

    thanks for this great article.

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  31. 31

    It’s really amazing….Never came like kind of site. very very useful..

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  32. 32

    Awesome article. keep the same spirit and get back with few more new ideas.

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  33. 33

    thanks for this great article.

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  34. 34

    Its great… the article really helped me in organizing the flow of my work. really appreciate the efforts of the writer and publisher.

    0
  35. 35

    Mufeed Ahmad (Web Dsigner)

    November 13, 2008 2:17 am

    yes its helpful for us but i think most of the buddies know this thing very well

    0

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