A Small Study Of Big Blogs: Further Findings

Advertisement

Last week we presented the first results of our study of top blogs1. As promised, this week we publish the second part of the survey, including further findings and problem solutions we have found out during the study. In the first part we discussed layout design and typographic settings. What remains to be covered are the navigation design, information architecture, advertisements and functionality (RSS-feeds, tag clouds, pagination etc.).

Reminder: since we wanted to make the survey as objective as possible, we used Technorati Top Blogs2 and analyzed 50 most popular blogs which appear there. We have identified important design problems and considered solutions for each of the problems separately.

We have posed 30 questions which we wanted to to answer with our blog survey. Below we present further findings of our survey of popular blog designs — the second part of the analysis of 50 popular blogs according to Technorait’s Top 100.

Please notice: the results presented below should not be considered as guidelines for an effective blog design. They are supposed to give you the intuition of which solution may be better than the other one. Still it is useful to know what big players do and, more importantly, what they don’t do.

3. Structure

Information design is usually even more important than visual design. The structure and hierarchy of the content (the way the content is presented), has a tremendous impact on how visitors perceive the presented information and how well they can scan it when looking for some specific information. In the context of the information architecture navigation plays the most important role.

3.1. Navigation menu: top, left or right?

Few years ago, before the wave of blogs has overflooded the Web, it was an unwritten rule to place the navigation menu on the left-hand side of the layout. Today it definitely does not hold for top blogs.

We have found out that

  • 58% use right-hand side (vertical) navigation
    (Scobleizer, TPM, CrunchGear, Neatorama, Google Blog, DailyKos, Engadget),
  • 52% use a primary horizontal navigation at the top (often combined with a right-hand side secondary navigation)
    (A List Apart, Google Blogoscoped, Dooce, GigaOM, TreeHugger, Smashing Magazine, Mashable, ReadWriteWeb, Ars Technica, TechCrunch, Huffington Post),
  • 12% use left-hand side (vertical) navigation,

Actually, visitors do not care whether your navigation menu is placed on the top or in the sidebar. As long as your usability tests confirm that most first-time visitors can easily identify the menu and use available options up front, you are on the right side. So essentially you can use any of the solutions presented above.

ReadWriteWeb3
ReadWriteWeb4 uses a primary horizontal navigation at the top of the layout.

In fact, visitors aren’t really confused when the navigation design doesn’t completely follow conventions. However, it is designer’s task to ensure that the navigation is clear and unambiguous — independent of how exactly it is designed.

A number of users prefer the right-hand side navigation, because from the ergonomic point of view it is more pleasant to use. Since 70-95% of people are right-handed5, it is sound to assume that the mouse pointer usually reseats on the right half of the window.

Why? The scroll bar is placed to the right of the browser window. Hence, if the mouse doesn’t have a wheel users need to use the scrollbar more often than browser-buttons in the toolbar of the browser. Since scrollbar is necessarily used on most (or at least many) of sites the mouse pointer is likely to be close to the scroll bar. Consequently, the required motion path to the right-hand side navigation is smaller than the path to the left-hand side navigation.

3.2. How many posts on the start page?

From the user’s perspective there is nothing worse than an extreme cognitive load which comes from the information overload on some site. As Smashing Magazine we know exactly how hard it is to find the optimum between extensive article and information overkill.

When too much information is presented to the users, they try to escape the cognitive load — they bookmark the page for future visits (and never visit it again) or simply close the browser window, because they can’t cope with the information presented to them.

Presenting an optimal amount of content is crucial to keep your visitors on your site and, more importantly, make sure that they’ll come back to your site.

  • 28% have 14 – 18 posts on their start page
    (Tuaw, Slashfilm, Gizmodo, TMZ, Lifehacker, ArsTechnica),
  • 26% have 10 – 12 posts
    (ProBlogger, TechCrunch, Dooce, ReadWriteWeb, CrunchGear),
  • 14% have 20-26 posts
    (ValleyWag, Seth Godin, Search Engine Land),
  • 10% have 2 – 6 posts
    (A List Apart, Smashing Magazine, CopyBlogger),
  • 10% have 27 – 35 posts
    (Kottke, Boing Boing, ThinkProgress, Neatorama),
  • 8% have 7 – 9 posts
    (GigaOM, Mashable, TreeHugger),
  • 2% have 36+ posts
    (Andre Sullivan, 50 posts).

Ars Technica6
Ars Technica7 has excerpts of 18 posts on its start page. 28% of top blogs have 14-18 posts on their start page.

3.3. Are related and popular posts displayed?

We couldn’t identify a trend toward displaying links to the articles related to the post currently viewed by the visitors. 54% of top blogs display related posts (GigaOM, CopyBlogger, ProBlogger, ReadWriteWeb, Mashable, Engadget, TreeHugger), while the rest does not display them (Dooce, TechCrunch, BoingBoing).

Only 48% of top blogs display popular posts. Among them are Zen Habits, CopyBlogger, DailyKos, Mashable, ReadWriteWeb, Smashing Magazine and Huffington Post. Most recent comments are displayed by 16% of the blogs (ReadWriteWeb, BoingBoing, TreeHugger, TMZ, Tuaw). However, the majority of the blogs doesn’t present recent comments on the start page at all.

GigaOM8
GigaOM9 belongs to 54% of top blogs that in each article display a list of related posts. In fact, the blog displays links to related articles twice.

3.4. What information is placed in the footer?

Most web-sites use footers to present rather unspectacular information such as terms of service, W3C-hints, help, copyright and links to the “about us”-page. However, there are more options available (see Footers In Modern Web Design: Creative Examples and Ideas10). Interestingly enough, our survey provides some useful ideas for design of a footer as well.

The footers may contain

  • copyright, legal, privacy, terms of service, terms of use (90%),
  • link to the “about us”-page (40%)
    (GigaOM, TMZ, ProBlogger, ReadWriteWeb, Ars Technica),
  • link to advertising-page (38%)
    (Slashfilm, Dooce, GigaOM, ReadWriteWeb, Gizmodo).
  • link to the contact information (30%)
    (Kottke, GigaOM, ReadWriteWeb, ProBlogger),
  • links to RSS-feeds (22%)
    (Slashfilm, Ars Technica, BoingBoing),

BoingBoing11
BoingBoing12 has navigation options as well as links to RSS-feeds and e-mail-subscription in its footer.

  • link to FAQ or Help (22%)
    (Gizmodo, ArsTechnica, Andrew Sullivan),
  • search box (14%)
    (Dooce, Tuaw, Engadget),
  • link to the top of the page (10%)
    (TreeHugger, Zen Habits),
  • link to the start page (10%)
    (Kottke, CrunchGear, Joystiq, TPM),
  • link to the site map (8%)
    (Andrew Sullivan, Wired, Tecaucus @ NY Times),

Joystiq13
Joystiq14‘s footer is neither beautiful nor effective. Less is sometimes more. The image under the footer is an ad.

44% of the blogs display more than just a simple copyright-disclaimer and few links. For instance, Zenhabits2715 (with some kind of a site map) and Netorama2216 (with further navigation options). Problogger17 additionally presents a link to the about-page. 58% use a “standard” approach which often is chosen to be rather minimal (e.g. Techcrunch18). The rest uses no footer at all.

4. Advertisements

In many cases, particularly when considering top-blogs, advertisements are necessary to keep the site alive, pay bills for traffic, support the editorial team and hence enable the publishers to actually publish the content. And most users are willing to have disturbing and colorful ads next to the content if they get the information they are looking for. But where is the limit and how do big blogs display ads on their sites? And what are users used to? Let’s find out.

4.1. How many ads per page?

Bad news: the blogosphere is heavily infected with ads. Only few sites don’t contain any advertisements at all and in most cases there are more than 2-3 ad blocks per page. Usually blogs combine sponsor ads with text link advertising similar to Google AdSense. Disturbing contextual advertising (underlined links with pop-ups) could be found on 12% of the sites.

The number of advertising blocks on an article page is usually the same as the number of blocks on a start page or even slightly higher. Reason: many publishers tend to use text link advertising such as Google AdSense in the articles or below the posts. Further findings:

  • on average 5,84 advertising blocks per start page
    (Mashable has most ads (20), TechCrunch wins the second place (15)),
  • on average 5,96 advertising blocks per article page,
  • 68% of the blogs use Google AdSense
    (among exceptions: Kottke, Scoble, Joystiq, Tuaw, CopyBlogger, Valleywag, GigaOM),

The award for the widest ad block goes to Kotaku19 with an 1000px ad block in the middle of the page.

4.2. Are ads displayed in the content area?

In the content area of the layout ads are usually placed directly below the post. We have observed that advertising in the middle of the post is still popular, however it is used (relatively) rarely.

According to our findings,

  • 76% had no ads in the articles (but might have ads below or above)
    (Dooce, A List Apart, ReadWriteWeb, Mashable, TechCrunch, BoingBoing),
  • 44% had ads below the article and before the comments
    (ProBlogger, Zen Habits, Engadget, Smashing Magazine, Tuaw, CopyBlogger, GigaOM),
  • 18% displayed ads within the content (Huffington Post, Yanko, PerezHilton, Slashfilm, Search Engine Land),
  • 6% displayed the ads directly below the headline and before the content of the article
    (Smashing Magazine, Neatorama, Yanko),

4.3. Where are ads placed in the layout?

Apart from the content area one usually expects ads… well, everywhere: at the top, on the right-hand side and even at the bottom of the page. Indeed, on 12% of the reviewed blogs ads could be found everywhere — on the top, on the bottom, on the left and on the right of the main content. That’s not good. But, apparently, users got used to it and stubbornly ignore disturbing ads consuming the content offered to them.

Further findings:

  • there are ads on the right-hand side (88%)
    (GigaOM, CopyBlogger, Engadget, TechCrunch, Smashing Magazine),
  • there are ads on the top (42%),
    (Gizmodo, Talking Points Memo, Autoblog, TreeHugger, TMZ, PerezHilton),
  • there are ads on the left-hand side (34%)
    (Lifehacker, Mashable, Gizmodo),
  • there are ads on the bottom (24%),
    (Andrew Sulivan, Tuaw, Wired).
  • there are no ads (8%),
    (Google Blog, Think Progress, Seth Godin).

5. Functionality

To achieve its primary goals, design needs to be not only user-friendly, but also functional. All important functions should be available and clearly visible and the user must have a simple intuition of what actions are required to actually use them. For instance, new visitors should know up fron where is an RSS-button, where are social buttons, where the search box is placed and how to contact the owner of the blog.

5.1. Are social buttons and icons used?

Social icons have managed to become popular, yet they are far away from becoming a standard. Icons are used slightly more often than simple text links. Web-services such as Addthis20 which hide a number of popular social buttons behind one single “social” button and display them once this button is hovered are quite popular. Advantage of this approach: content area remains clean and provides a good overview of available option. Disadvantage: some users may not find the way to vote for the story on a social network.

According to our findings,

  • 54% of top blogs use social icons below the post
    (GigaOM, ProBlogger, Mashable, Ars Technica, BoingBoing, ReadWriteWeb),
  • 38% don’t use social icons
    (Dooce, Google Blogoscoped, Scobleizer, Political Ticker),
  • 8% use social icons above the posts (Smashing Magazine, TreeHugger, The Huffington Post).

Screenshot21
Netorama2216 uses social buttons embedded in a bubble. RSS-feed and e-mail-subscription are available as well.

5.2. RSS-feeds: position and visual appearance

Since an RSS-button is probably the most important design element which binds visitors to the blog, it should be given a prominent position in the site layout. In fact, there was a good reason behind designing large, glossy RSS-buttons in the Web 2.0-era: these buttons needed to be visible at the first glance.

Therefore it’s not surprising that RSS-buttons still (usually) can be found in the header of blogs. In fact, only 38% of top blogs display an RSS-button in the header, while 28% present it in the top area of the sidebar. The middle area of the sidebar (8%), bottom of the sidebar (14%) and footer (8%) are used as well, but they are not as popular as the upper area of the layout. However, here RSS-buttons often appear additionally to the button at the top of the site.

It’s interesting to notice that only 66% of the sites used a standard RSS-icon to indicate their feed, while the rest used simple text links for the same purpose.

Screenshot23
GigaOM24 has two RSS-feeds and an alternative e-mail-subscription.

Regarding the number of available RSS-feeds: we’ve found out that 64% of top blogs have only 1 main RSS-feed. Often comments-feeds and tags-feeds are available as well; however, it seems that only few blogs actually offer multiple channels (e.g. feeds for some specific topics). In 56% of the cases publishers were offering an e-mail-subscription as an alternative to RSS-feeds.

24% publicly display the number of RSS-readers, usually via Feedburner. WordPress-users can consider Feedcount25 as a handy alternative and define their own designs for the button. However, here Feedburner is required as well.

Screenshot26
Zenhabits2715 displays the number of site’s RSS-subscribers.

5.3. Tag clouds in use?

Tag clouds provide a good overview of the popular topics covered on a blog and their weight throughout the blog. However, 90% of top blogs don’t have any kind of tag clouds and present standard navigation options instead. According to our intuition there is often just no space for a tag cloud which is why when a tag cloud is used at all then it is rather small and compact.

Among sites who have a tag cloud are The Huffington Post, ReadWriteWeb and Joystiq. You can find more information about tag clouds in our article Tag Clouds Gallery: Examples And Good Practices28.

5.4. Pagination in use?

Surprisingly, pagination was used only on 22% of the sites we’ve reviewed (among them are Dooce, GigaOM, Mashable, ReadWriteWeb). In most cases a standard navigation with “next” and “previous”-links is used (60%).

Pagination offers a lot of advantages as it shows to the visitors how much content is available and allows them to quickly jump to older articles. Our article Pagination Gallery: Examples And Good Practices29 provides creative examples of what can be achieved with pagination.

Some blogs also use calendar navigation (6%, Thecaucus, Andrew Sullivan) or an archive section instead (12%, A List Apart, TPM, The Huffington Post)

Screenshot30
Pagination on Gigaom

Screenshot31
An unusual navigation on Treehugger32. Instead of pagination and usual next-prev-navigation, the site displays articles which appear on the next and on the previous archive page.

Screenshot33
The Caucus34 with an archive instead of pagination and next-prev-navigation.

5.5. Where to place the search box?

Only 62% of top blogs have a search box in the right upper corner of the site layout. Among them in 58% of the cases the search box is placed in the header. The rest of the blogs place it in the top area of the sidebar. Search box in the middle of the sidebar and in the lower part of the sidebar is less popular (16%). Footer as the only place to display the search box is used only once (Dooce35) and Kottke36 doesn’t have a search box at all.

Screenshot37
Dooce displays a search box only in the footer of the site.

5.6. Where to place the link to the contact page?

Most top blogs place the link to the contact page in the sidebar. Usually this link is among further navigation options available in the right-hand side navigation menu or in the left-hand side navigation menu. Sometimes icons are also used (particularly the e-mail icon) to indicate the purpose of the link.

  • 52% of the blogs place the link to the contact page in the sidebar (Engadget, TMZ, DailyKos, Smashing Magazine),
  • 40% place the contact link in the header
    (A List Apart, Dooce, CopyBlogger, ProBlogger, Ars Technica, Tech Crunch),
  • 30% have a contact link in the footer
    (ReadWriteWeb, ProBlogger, Mashable, TMZ),
  • in 4% of the cases the link to the contact form was hidden in the about-section (TreeHugger).

It’s worth mentioning that most blogs provide readers only with a “contact e-mail” (64%), while only 28% have a contact form which needs to be filled in online. 8% offer both a contact form and the e-mail (Yanko, TechCrunch). And Zen Habits asks its readers to comment on a blog’s entry to get in touch with the blog’s owner.

5.6. Are top blogs standard-conform?

Actually, before conducting the survey we have assumed that the content would be more important than design for most blogs. However, we didn’t expect that only 4% of the top blogs are actually standard-conform.

Apparently,

  • 96% of top blogs are not standard-conform,
  • 8% of top blogs have over 500 errors
    (Ben Smith’s Blog, Neatorama, Search Engine Land),
  • 28% have 200 – 499 errors,
    (BoingBoing, ProBlogger, Google Blog, Engadget),
  • 24% have 100 – 199 errors,
    (TreeHugger, Mashable, ReadWriteWeb, Gigazine, TUAW),
  • 22% have 50 – 99 errors,
    (TechCrunch, CopyBlogger, Dooce, Ars Technica, Lifehacker),
  • 10% have 1 – 49 errors,
    (Kottke, GigaOM, AutoBlog, Google Blogoscoped),
  • 4% have 0 errors
    (e.g. A List Apart).

Screenshot38
Neatorama39 is not valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional. That’s no wonder — the page is built with tables.

The awards for most errors goes to Ben Smith’s Blog40 (2286 errors, no Doctype definition), Neatorama41 (1428) and Search Engine Land42 (1116).

There is a simple reason for “invalid” HTML-code: from the perspective of Web standards, ad-servers are nothing but horrible. They almost never produce a valid code which is why most blogs (which need to have advertising to keep them alive) are almost never standard-conform. The publisher often has no choice and needs to compromise the quality of the code with the revenues resulting from “dirty” source code of ad-servers.

Bottom line

Let’s conclude survey results with a brief overview of the main findings. Please keep in mind that the results of the survey should not be considered as guidelines for an effective blog design — this is a topic for another article.

  • usually right-hand side vertical (58%) and top horizontal navigation (52%) are used;
  • the start page presents excerpts of 10-20 posts (62%),
  • related and popular posts are displayed on every second top blog (50%),
  • footer contains copyright information (90%), links to about-page (40%) and link to contact information (30%),
  • on average popular blogs have 5,84 advertising blocks per start page,
  • on average popular blogs have 5,96 advertising blocks per article page,
  • articles often contain no ads (76%),
  • layouts usually contain ads on the right-hand side (88%),
  • social icons are often placed under the post (54%),
  • RSS-buttons are displayed in the above area of the layout (66%),
  • “standard” RSS-icons are used more often than text links (66%),
  • most publishers use one main RSS-feed instead of multiple feeds (64%),
  • tag clouds are not used (90%),
  • pagination is used rarely (22%),
  • search box in the right upper corner of the site layout (62%),
  • 96% of top blogs are not standard-conform.

Please stay tuned and subscribe to our RSS-feed43 Subscribe to our RSS-feed44, we are going to conduct more design-related surveys in the future.

Footnotes

  1. 1 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/07/24/a-small-study-of-big-blogs/
  2. 2 http://www.technorati.com/pop/blogs
  3. 3 http://www.readwriteweb.com/
  4. 4 http://www.readwriteweb.com/
  5. 5 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right-handed
  6. 6 http://www.arstechnica.com/
  7. 7 http://www.arstechnica.com/
  8. 8 http://gigaom.com
  9. 9 http://www.gigaom.com/
  10. 10 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/04/08/footers-in-modern-web-design-creative-examples-and-ideas/
  11. 11 http://www.boingboing.net
  12. 12 http://www.boingboing.net/
  13. 13 http://www.joystiq.com/
  14. 14 http://www.joystiq.com/
  15. 15 http://zenhabits.net/
  16. 16 http://www.neatorama.com/
  17. 17 http://www.problogger.net/
  18. 18 http://www.techcrunch.com/
  19. 19 http://www.kotaku.com
  20. 20 http://www.addthis.com/
  21. 21 http://www.neatorama.com/
  22. 22 http://www.neatorama.com/
  23. 23 http://www.gigaom.com/
  24. 24 http://www.gigaom.com
  25. 25 http://www.mapelli.info/feed/feed-count-12
  26. 26 http://zenhabits.net/
  27. 27 http://zenhabits.net/
  28. 28 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/11/07/tag-clouds-gallery-examples-and-good-practices/
  29. 29 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2007/11/16/pagination-gallery-examples-and-good-practices/
  30. 30 http://gigaom.com/
  31. 31 http://www.treehugger.com/
  32. 32 http://www.treehugger.com
  33. 33 http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/
  34. 34 http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/
  35. 35 http://www.dooce.com
  36. 36 http://www.kottke.org
  37. 37 http://dooce.com/
  38. 38 http://validator.w3.org/check?verbose=1&uri=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.neatorama.com%2F
  39. 39 http://www.neatorama.com
  40. 40 http://www.politico.com/blogs/bensmith/
  41. 41 http://www.neatorama.com/
  42. 42 http://searchengineland.com/
  43. 43 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-rss.php
  44. 44 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-rss.php

↑ Back to topShare on Twitter

Vitaly Friedman loves beautiful content and doesn’t like to give in easily. Vitaly is writer, speaker, author and editor-in-chief of Smashing Magazine. He runs responsive Web design workshops, online workshops and loves solving complex performance problems in large companies. Get in touch.

Advertising

Note: Our rating-system has caused errors, so it's disabled at the moment. It will be back the moment the problem has been resolved. We're very sorry. Happy Holidays!

  1. 1

    Great ! Thanks. This one will come in handy.

  2. 2

    I wish I had time to read blogs! Stinkin’ deliverables.

  3. 3

    very nice, glad to see my blog falls into the “majority”

  4. 4

    so are standards not as important as made out to be?

  5. 5

    Excelente trabajo, excelentes datos!!!!

  6. 6

    Great post – it’s good for us designers to know these things… now when i design a blog, i know where ppl tend to look for information etc…

    Keep it up!
    Pallian

  7. 7

    I really think that these are great, the most interesting things I’ve read since… Ever! They really are useful. Thanks.

  8. 8

    Woohoo! We win most errors awards! Actually, there’s a reason why Neatorama is built with tables: it’s much more error-resistant than CSS, and I don’t have to worry about how it looks across different browsers…. :)

  9. 9

    Surprising that so few sites validate. Get on it people…google will love you!

    inmeres.com

  10. 10

    i hate ads…

  11. 11

    Another terrific post; I can see this being very useful. I’m quite surprised that 96% of these top blogs don’t meet web standards. I wonder why this is?

  12. 12

    Nice article. Your link to boingboing.net is bad, though (you have it pointing to boingboint.net)

  13. 13

    Vitaly Friedman & Sven Lennartz

    July 31, 2008 12:01 pm

    @Brian Cook (#12): thanks, fixed.

  14. 14

    “articles often contain no ads (76%),”

    Unless of course the article itself is promotional of a certain service or product.

    @MikeWhoBikes: Large blogs usually have multiple contributors who have their own way of dealing with the WYSIWYG editors in the CMS, which results in an accumulation of HTML styling errors.

  15. 15

    Nice and valuable resource.

  16. 16

    Nice article ! Anyway, why is it in the “How-To” category?

  17. 17

    I think 96% of top blogs are not standard conform because 96% of them contain ads. Thanks for the case study, it really helps me a lot.

  18. 18

    lols, i really find it funny that the reason for non standards compliance are the ads, but its really annoying that google makes your site appear on firefox with an html validator addon with a beatiful x button on the bottom,
    i just wish adsense and other big advertising site hosts take this accessibility issue into consideration

  19. 19

    Jehzeel Laurente

    July 31, 2008 6:25 pm

    another great post from smashing magazine :D

    this blog is really worth subscribing for! :)

  20. 20

    Marcelo Barbosa

    July 31, 2008 7:36 pm

    Very important Post. This study shows good information.
    Thank you for the high quality of the articles.

  21. 21

    value added points to all blog developers. Also expecting a popular plugins list used in the top bloggers. Must needed plugins for the new bloggers?

  22. 22

    cool article..

    typing error in: The publisher often has no choice and needs to compromise the quality of the code with the revenues resulting from “dirty” source cofe of ad-servers.

  23. 23

    NIce article – I really LIKE it. Funny to see that a blog as http://www.eeepc.dk witch is just using a quick free theme is automatically doing the same ind almost every aspect as the big ones do. :-)
    I would really LOVE it, if you could write this article about “guidelines for an effective blog design” next – it would be 100 times more intereseting than these “what the big ones do – but might be a really bad ways to go by the way”. Thanks!

  24. 24

    Vitaly Friedman & Sven Lennartz

    July 31, 2008 11:24 pm

    @Thomas (#22): thanks, fixed!

    @Chrstian Brix (#23): it is already in the queue… ;-)

  25. 25

    Thanks for research

  26. 26

    @Neatorama

    Spoken like someone still living in 1999 :-)

  27. 27

    Shame on them for having so much errors :o dear god…. 500? how on earth >_

  28. 28

    Bad News : Blogs have ads?!?!?!

    It continues to amaze me that people complain or have this hate of advertisements. The web wouldnt have near the content, proliferation or innovation it does today without ads. Period, end of story. I would wager that 50%+ of these top blogs wouldnt be in existence without ads, people couldnt put the time necessary in to run these sites without someone paying them. Like it or not, ads make the web go round.

    Understood that placing ads can make a page non standards compliant. To all you whiners I got two words for you… Internet Exploder. Most widely used browser in the world, NOT STANDARDS COMPLIANT. Its crappy, but its true. Get over your elitist selves and click on some ads. :P

    What i find most amusing about the comments by the post author… Smashing Magazine has 9 ads on each page. I wonder what the stats are on how many ads are on top blog pages? :)

  29. 29

    Marvelous!

  30. 30

    Great article! I would love to see more information about how many links are offered in the primary navigation, since that can also contribute to information overload and user frustration.

  31. 31

    What a great list of perspectives into blogs with a lot of different content. Thank you for the research and write up!

  32. 32

    Thanks for this study. It helps me a lot as a student.

  33. 33

    Point of grammar: a site is ‘standards conforming’, not ‘standard conform'; although the more accepted usage is ‘standards compliant’.

  34. 34

    Interesting article, but I disagree on some of your points:

    A number of users prefer the right-hand side navigation, because from the ergonomic point of view it is more pleasant to use. Since 70-95% of people are right-handed, it is sound to assume that the mouse pointer usually reseats on the right half of the window. Why? The scroll bar is placed to the right of the browser window.

    I think that advantage is cancled out by the fact that we read from left to right. I can only speak for myself, but I find it much easier to find information when it’s on the left side. When I look at the right side it disrupts my reading pattern.

    This may be something that I have “learned” by using old web sites, but usability studies also suggest that the left side of the page is the “hot zone”.

    If you factor in all the people who feels like me and adds the huge number of mice with scroll buttons, a right side menu probably helps less people than it annoys.

  35. 35

    …bad news, blogs have lots of ads…
    I KNOW! like you guys with a huge ad at the beggining

  36. 36

    This too… Thanks.. better knowing this for me actually.. :)

  37. 37

    i dont understand this step :
    “We have found out that” , 58% + 52% + 12%
    this amount set 100% of blog ?
    my home page is under 52% ? Mobile

  38. 38

    Mehmet - My Netbook World

    April 30, 2010 11:33 am

    Good to know this kind of things. Thanks!

  39. 39

    Great article for beginners to have an idea what is all about designing for a blog.good survey and valuble information.

  40. 40

    Hello everyone @ http://www.smashingmagazine.com, I just want to wish [b]Ramadan Kareem[/b] :)
    What will be the hottest place to participate in Eid this year?

  41. 41

    Time will only tell, Iraq just a few days ago held a auction in Baghdad in the green zone of Iraq for Iraq’s oil fields China and U.S. Bought them out so im pretty sure it might but time can only tell you just have to be patient.

  42. 42

    Debit and place one’s faith are the two aspects of every fiscal transaction. Their say and import is the fundamental concept in the double-entry bookkeeping method, in which every debit arrangement be compelled from a corresponding honour business(s) and fault versa.

    Debits and credits are a way of abstract acclimated to in bookkeeping to determine how to relate any fiscal transaction. In financial accounting or bookkeeping, “Dr” (Debit) obviously means sinistral side of a ledger account and “Cr” (Depend on) is the above-board side of a ledger account.[1]

    To clinch whether harmonious obligation debit or creditation a fixed account we reason the fresh accounting equation passage which consists of five accounting elements or rules.[2] An choice to this passage is to make bring into play of the traditional three rules of accounting for: Legal accounts, Personal accounts, and Supposed accounts to determine whether to debit or believe an account

  43. 43

    I’m shocked……You can’t even have a normal conversation on forums these days because of heavily
    injected spam!!! Can the moderators use some sort of filters? Even the social netowks are compressed
    by spam! We need to do something about this!

  44. 44

    Fantastic! Helped me alot to design a blog… But a thing i want to ask is for functionality how to best display the comments section ….5.6 repeated

↑ Back to top