10 Harsh Truths About Corporate Blogging

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I have reached the conclusion that most organizations have a blog simply because they feel they should. Many marketing departments fail to “get” blogging and have poorly visited blogs with few comments. Because their blog fails to perform, they conclude that blogging is an ineffective marketing tool and either remove it entirely or leave it to languish.

However, it does not need to be this way. Corporate blogs can be a powerful communication tool that builds brand awareness and nurtures a sense of engagement. You only need to look at the vibrant community surrounding the 37Signals blog1 to know that corporate blogging can work.

Why are most corporate blogs failing and why do the few succeed? To answer these questions, we need to face a few harsh truths about corporate blogging.

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1. A blog does not magically generate traffic

When companies first started launching corporate websites, they perceived them as a marketing channel that would generate leads. They had a “build it and they will come” mentality. Over time they realized that a website is more like a storefront. A few people might wander in off the street, but most of the time you need to advertise to attract trade.

Many marketing departments are making a similar mistake with corporate blogs. They perceive them as a way to generate new traffic, when that is not their primary role. Admittedly, the keyword-heavy nature of a blog will help your organic rankings, but that is a secondary benefit.

A screenshot of an article featuring some useful strategies to build up the traffic over years.5
To generate traffic, you need to sincerely commit to your blog, establish a relationship with your readers and engage them in conversations. And, as Rand Fishkin’s article 21 Tactics to Increase Blog Traffic6 suggests, you also need to use some strategies to build up the traffic over years.

The real goal of a corporate blog is to generate reccuring traffic which is considerably more likely to complete a call to action. A successful blog has a regular readership that is being constantly reminded of your brand and products. And yes, of course, building up a readership takes time.

2. Good corporate blog requires long term commitment

Building a readership is a long term commitment. It can take months for users to recognise your blog as a consistent source of useful information. Only then will they start visiting it regularly and recommending it to others.

It doesn’t just take time, it also takes commitment. That means posting regularly and to a schedule. Users are more likely to visit your blog if they know you release a post on a certain day each week. Of course, ultimately you want them to subscribe, so they don’t need to continually check your site for new content.

3. Teaser feeds are a wasted opportunity

Users can subscribe in a couple of ways. Usually they can either sign up to receive email notifications or subscribe to an RSS feed. This is a crucial step in engaging readers. That is because users are effectively giving you permission to remind them about your site and brand.

However, it is remarkable how many organizations fail to grasp this opportunity. Instead of using the chance to push content to users, they only provide a teaser of blog posts. This means users have to click through to view the whole post.

This practice is born out of a false belief that users need to see your site. They don’t. Unless your revenue is driven by site advertising, there is no need for users to click through to read your blog.

McDonald's blog doesn't get it right: teasers in feeds aren't useful in corporate blogs.7
McDonald’s blog8 doesn’t get it right: teasers in feeds aren’t useful in corporate blogs.

The purpose of most corporate blogs is to build and maintain brand awareness while motivating users to engage. None of that needs to happen on site. The blog post itself builds and maintains awareness, while requests for comments or calls to action motivates users to engage. Users do not need to see the rest of your site to respond to the blog post. Of course for that to be true, posts need to be engaging.

4. You are not “engaging” anyone

The most successful blogs are more than a broadcast tool. They are a dialogue between the individuals within your organization and your users. It is important to listen, as well as speak. Unfortunately, the most corporate blogs fail to engage.

Instead they focus on telling readers how great their products and services are. Rarely do they ask for feedback or ask questions. In fact it is not unusual for companies to disable comments for fear of criticism.

Nokia Conversations blog does a great job of engaging users in conversations, asking for their opinions and starting discussions that generate many comments and gather many opinions.9
Nokia Conversations blog10 does a great job of engaging users in conversations, asking for their opinions and starting discussions that generate many comments and gather many opinions.

Instead you should be encouraging users to contribute to your blog through comments and constructive criticism. It is a superb opportunity to get free feedback from your customers, something many organizations pay market researchers for. Part of the problem is that most corporate blogs offer nothing more than rehashed press releases.

5. Press releases shouldn’t appear on a blog

Let”s set aside the debate over whether press releases have a role in today”s web centric world. Whether they do or don’t, you need to realize that a press release preforms a different role to that of corporate blog. As the name implies, a press release is meant for professional journalists. It is designed to encourage journalists to write about your product or service. It is not designed for your customers.

A blog, on the other hand, is meant to be read by prospective and existing customers. It should be engaging, informative and helpful. When writing a blog post, you should always have the end reader in mind. What will they learn? What insight will this give them into who we are? How will it help build our relationship with the reader? You should never simply copy and paste press releases or news stories.

The other problem with press releases is that they are corporate statements. A blog should have a more personal tone.

6. You sound like a faceless corporation

People don’t like interacting with organizations, corporations or machines. People like talking to people. One of the things I have learnt about selling web design services is that once people have established that you offer a good service at a reasonable price, the next thing they care about is you. Do they like you? Do they trust you? Do they think they can work with you?

People don’t like, trust or want to work with corporations. We associated those feelings with individuals, not companies. It is therefore important that a corporate blog is about the people within your organization, not the organization itself. Your blog should focus on different people and the role they perform within your company. They should be able to demonstrate their personality as well as share their expertise.

A blog is a place to let readers see behind the marketing spin and glimpse the real people within your organization.

7. You need to show the warts and all

If you are a marketeer this may all sound a little scary. Its hard to control “the message” when you are blogging. You have multiple bloggers from across your organization who are effectively becoming corporate spokespeople, and you are allowing users to publicly criticize you on your own blog. This is a long way from traditional marketing.

However, today”s consumers are very savvy. They are distrustful of traditional marketing and can sense when they are being sold at. A softer approach is required, one that is more “real&” and less managed. One part of that is admitting when you make mistakes.

A screenshot of GetSatisfaction.com

Dell consistantly ignored critism they received about poor customer service. They ignored the voice that the web provided their customers, until eventually a single disgruntled user stirred up a major PR nightmare with a single post entitled “Dell lies. Dell sucks.11

Contrast this with the “warts and all” approach adopted by photo sharing site Flickr. When faced with community criticism over the poor performance of their website, they wrote a post on their blog entitled “Sometimes we suck.12” They acknowledged the problem and laid out a plan for correcting it. This non traditional approach to their brand image allowed Flickr to quickly defuse a situation that could have grown out of control.

A blog post on flickr entitled 'Sometimes we suck'13

Perhaps when it comes to corporate blogging, marketing is not always best equipped to handle the task.

8. Marketeers often make bad bloggers

Let me be clear. I am not saying that all marketeers should be banned from blogging. What I am saying is that traditional marketing skills are not always best suited to the medium. Because blogging should be personal, transparent and not shy away from the organization’s flaws, it can seem an uncomfortable communication tool for some marketeers. Also the traditional writing style of many marketeers does not fit well with the informal style of a successful blog.

If you are a marketeer responsible for the corporate blog, look for ways to encourage others within your organization to blog. Think of yourself as an editor rather than an author. Target people who are particularly knowledgeable or already act as spokespeople for your organization. Encourage them to blog and act as a copy editor tweaking and refining what they write. And don’t forget to give them raise once in a while, encouraging them to write more high quality content.

You may find it hard to encourage others to blog. If that is the case try interviewing them instead. You can then turn those interviews into blog posts and hopefully encourage them to respond to comments. But remember, whether you are posting an interview or an article, do not expect too much from your readers.

9. You expect too much from your readers

Most of the corporate blog posts I have read are long, really long, text heavy and boring. They take considerable commitment to wade through. In short, they ask too much from readers.

With so many blogs online you need to make your posts stand out from the crowd. Always ensure that users can get the gist of what you are saying by just scanning the post. This can be achieved using a number of techniques…

  • Summarize a post at the beginning and in the title. Don’t leave users guessing what the subject is.
  • Be controversial to grab users attention.
  • Use headings as a way of grabbing attention and summarizing content.
  • Use images to break up the copy and communicate key points.

Do not feel all of your posts need to be an essay. Short posts that propose a question or draw the reader’s attention to another site are just as engaging. Anything that is of value to the user is worth posting.

Finally, remember that not all blog posts need to be textual. Consider buying a flipcam14 and recording some video interviews with people around the company. Record an audio interview or post some photographs of corporate events. Just don’t expect users to read lots of copy. The only people who do that are your competitors.

10. Your competitors will read your blog – Get over it!

I am amazed at how many organizations will slow down the growth of their corporate blogs because they are worried that their competition will read it and rip off their expertise and ideas. Although it is true that your competition will do exactly this, what is the alternative? One the primary opportunities a blog provides is the chance to demonstrate your expertise. People will be motivated to buy from you because they understand that you “know your stuff.” However, if you don’t talk about your expertise, how will they know? You might be the best in your field, but if nobody knows it then what is the point?

I write about my knowledge of web design all the time. I know that many of those who read my posts are competitors and learn from what I share. However, I know that a lot of prospective clients read the content too. Should I silence myself for fear of being copied or should I prove to my clients that I am a professional who knows what he is talking about? I think the answer is clear.

Conclusions

Many organizations are still finding their voice online and corporate blogging is one way to achieve this. It is not surprizing that they are still making mistakes. The secret to success is accepting that a blog is not a traditional marketing tool. In my opinion, it has more in common with a customer service. Once you realize that and release it from the shackles of press releases and corporate news, it will start generating return on investment.

Learn more about the Smashing Book!15

We also discuss strategies for effective branding and marketing in our upcoming Smashing Book16 ($23.90 $29.90, available worldwide). Pre-order right now17 and save 20% off the price!

Footnotes

  1. 1 http://37signals.com/svn/
  2. 2 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/08/05/the-smashing-book-pre-order-now-and-save-20/?utm_source=Smashing%2BMagazine&utm_medium=editorialbox&utm_content=editorialbox%2Btop&utm_campaign=Smashing%2BBook
  3. 3 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/08/05/the-smashing-book-pre-order-now-and-save-20/?utm_source=Smashing%2BMagazine&utm_medium=editorialbox&utm_content=editorialbox%2Btop&utm_campaign=Smashing%2BBook
  4. 4 http://shop.smashingmagazine.com/smashingbook-dispatcher.php?utm_source=Smashing%2BMagazine&utm_medium=editorialbox&utm_content=editorialbox%2Btop%20to%20cart&utm_campaign=Smashing%2BBook
  5. 5 http://www.seomoz.org/blog/21-tactics-to-increase-blog-traffic
  6. 6 http://www.seomoz.org/blog/21-tactics-to-increase-blog-traffic
  7. 7 http://www.crmcdonalds.com/publish/csr/home/_blog.html
  8. 8 http://www.crmcdonalds.com/publish/csr/home/_blog.html
  9. 9 http://conversations.nokia.com/2009/08/05/what-is-the-most-important-feature-in-a-web-browsing-device/
  10. 10 http://conversations.nokia.com/2009/08/05/what-is-the-most-important-feature-in-a-web-browsing-device/
  11. 11 http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2005/aug/29/mondaymediasection.blogging
  12. 12 http://blog.flickr.net/en/2005/07/21/sometimes-we-suck/
  13. 13 http://blog.flickr.net/en/2005/07/21/sometimes-we-suck/
  14. 14 http://www.theflip.com/
  15. 15 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/08/05/the-smashing-book-pre-order-now-and-save-20/?utm_source=Smashing%2BMagazine&utm_medium=editorialbox&utm_content=editorialbox%2Bbottom&utm_campaign=Smashing%2BBook
  16. 16 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2009/08/05/the-smashing-book-pre-order-now-and-save-20/?utm_source=Smashing%2BMagazine&utm_medium=editorialbox&utm_content=editorialbox%2Bbottom&utm_campaign=Smashing%2BBook
  17. 17 http://shop.smashingmagazine.com/smashingbook-dispatcher.php?utm_source=Smashing%2BMagazine&utm_medium=editorialbox&utm_content=editorialbox%2Bbottom%20to%20cart&utm_campaign=Smashing%2BBook

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Paul Boag is the author of Digital Adaptation and a leader in digital strategy with over 20 years experience. Through consultancy, speaking, writing, training and mentoring he passionately promotes digital best practice.

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  1. 1

    Terrific post! Very informative and accurate. When we started our blog, we were quickly discouraged by the lack of readership, and so we stopped blogging. We have since learned a lot, and understand the long-term commitment needed to get the most out of a blog. Thanks for the reminder!

    1
  2. 52

    Hi Paul,
    Another really good read. I thoroughly enjoy the BoagWorld podcasts and think what you guys are doing is right on.. I come from a background where our company was so worried about keeping our competitive advantages secretive, that clients didn’t know about them until they had a proposal in hand (which is sometimes too late). The world of blogging, twitter, facebook, etc. has changed marketing — for the better. Put it all out there and let clients decide whom is the best choice to complete their project.

    @wsol_jon

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  3. 103

    nice one as always :)

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  4. 154

    About Online Degrees

    December 16, 2009 10:07 pm

    Great post! we’re all looking for a quick fix to make our blogs work. And the comments made above are fantastic. At least if you’re not really getting the traffic you want, you’re still learning and writing about something you enjoy. Tnx for sharing sach a nice post.

    0
  5. 205

    This blog is really nice and informative. We are pleased to know this blog is really helping people.

    Thanks

    -1
  6. 256

    Accolade Events

    April 15, 2010 3:10 am

    Well despite the spam comments I can assure you that this is a strategy that should cover many bases, connecting with potential clients is one of the most beneficial, our blog is responsible for driving 20% of all traffic to our website and several clients a month are signed as a result. Its the quality and diversity of the sontent that counts but only if you set the blog up in a search engine friendly manner. accolade-corporate-events.com/ enjoys many valuable enquiries from people who find the blog content but also on the bookmarks and RSS feeds.

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  7. 307

    I think most corporate bloggers should be more than just graduates with degrees in literature. They need to be marketers. Entrepreneur types.

    -1
  8. 358

    Point #4 is very important, and not only for corporate bloggers. A blog is there to interact with the readers.
    Fatcow

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  9. 409

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    -1
  10. 460

    I think its very easy to run a corporate blog. Just dont write anything, except for coming soon, causes curiosity.

    -1
  11. 511

    This is a fantastic list. I’m not sure I agree that you should not publish Press Releases, I encourage my clients to publish their press releases… but not in that format. Rewriting or wrapping the content is essential to make it ‘blogworthy’. If an event within the company is important enough for a press release, surely it’s good enough for a blog post!

    We’ll definitely extend this post to our visitors at Corporate Blogging Tips!

    Doug

    1
  12. 562

    Nice stuff.This is my first time i visit here. I found so many interesting in your blog especially its discussion.Keep your blog updating,good luck…

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  13. 613

    True, sadly lot’s of corporate blogs have become ghost town with a lack of commitment. Blogging isn’t mandatory but could be used as a business tool.

    1

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