Author:

Alma Hoffmann is a visual communication and design educator in Alabama, US and a freelance designer. You can find her at studio2n.com and follow her on Twitter @almahoffmann. She has also wrote the article Finding Alternative Structures for Typographic Layout based on our surroundings, and you can see visit her blog at Temperamental Muses.

Twitter: Follow Alma Hoffmann on Twitter

“I Draw Pictures All Day”

“So, you do nothing all day.” That’s how many people would respond to someone who says they spend the day with a pen or pencil in their hand. It’s often considered an empty practice, a waste of time. They’re seen as an empty mind puttering along with the busy work of scribbling.

I Draw Pictures All Day

But for us designers and artists, drawing pictures all day is integral to our process and to who we are as creative people, and despite the idea that those who doodle waste time, we still get our work done. So, then, why are those of us who draw pictures all day even tempted to think that someone who is doodling or drawing pictures in a meeting or lecture is not paying attention?

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Finding Alternative Sources Of Typographic Layout In Our Surroundings

Studying art and design usually starts with a deep exploration of elements and principles. Among these elements, the most basic ones — line, point and plane — usually figure in a work of art or design. Thus, we can abstract art and design compositions to lines, points and planes when analyzing them. Not only is this abstraction useful for understanding the structure of a composition, but it also offers new sources of layout inspiration and experimentation.

http://www.faub.org/two.html

According to Wucius Wong in his book Principles of Form and Design (page 42), point, line and plane can be considered conceptual design elements because, although they are not always explicit or visible, they seem to be present by implication. He explains how an angle, for example, implies the existence of a point and how lines, by marking the contour of an object, imply the presence of a plane.

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