Author:

Andy Croxall is a Web developer from Wandsworth, London, England. He is a Javascript specialist and is an active member of the jQuery community, posting plugins and extensions. He has worked for clients ranging from the London Stock Exchange to Durex. You can keep up with him and his projects and creations on his website, mitya.co.uk.

Ten Oddities And Secrets About JavaScript

JavaScript. At once bizarre and yet beautiful, it is surely the programming language that Pablo Picasso would have invented. Null is apparently an object, an empty array is apparently equal to false, and functions are bandied around as though they were tennis balls.

Ten Oddities And Secrets About JavaScript

This article is aimed at intermediate developers who are curious about more advanced JavaScript. It is a collection of JavaScript’s oddities and well-kept secrets. Some sections will hopefully give you insight into how these curiosities can be useful to your code, while other sections are pure WTF material. So, let’s get started.

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Image Manipulation With jQuery & PHP GD

One of the numerous advantages brought about by the explosion of jQuery and other JavaScript libraries is the ease with which you can create interactive tools for your site. When combined with server-side technologies such as PHP, this puts a serious amount of power at your finger tips.

Image Manipulation With jQuery and PHP GD

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In this article, I’ll be looking at how to combine JavaScript/jQuery with PHP and, particularly, PHP’s GD library to create an image manipulation tool to upload an image, then crop it and finally save the revised version to the server. Sure, there are plugins out there that you can use to do this; but this article aims to show you what's behind the process. You can download the source files for reference.

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Commonly Confused Bits Of jQuery

The explosion of JavaScript libraries and frameworks such as jQuery onto the front-end development scene has opened up the power of JavaScript to a far wider audience than ever before. It was born of the need — expressed by a crescendo of screaming by front-end developers who were fast running out of hair to pull out — to improve JavaScript's somewhat primitive API, to make up for the lack of unified implementation across browsers and to make it more compact in its syntax.

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All of which means that, unless you have some odd grudge against jQuery, those days are gone — you can actually get stuff done now. A script to find all links of a certain CSS class in a document and bind an event to them now requires one line of code, not 10. To power this, jQuery brings to the party its own API, featuring a host of functions, methods and syntactical peculiarities. Some are confused or appear similar to each other but actually differ in some way. This article clears up some of these confusions.

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