Author:

Aurimas Adomavicius is a creative lead at DevBridge, a Chicago based web application development company. He is also responsible for the creation of the website review community, Concept Feedback. A photographer, web developer, and web designer whose opinion can be often heard on the company blog and on Twitter.

Twitter: Follow Aurimas Adomavicius on Twitter

How To Successfully Educate Your Clients On Web Development

If you are running a design agency, your job is very likely to combine business development, graphic design, technology and user experience design: a basketful of very different fields. When dealing with clients, one faces the challenge of clearly and effectively communicating the goals and results of the work done in these areas. In this post, we'll provide you with some ideas on sharing information and knowledge with developers and clients — a couple of tips and tricks we've learned from our own experience.

Education of clients

As designers, our core purpose is to solve business challenges for our clients. No, I haven’t forgotten you Mac-loving, single-mouse-button-fanatic designers. A business solution includes an application platform, solid data design and a page design that makes the UI and website approachable and easy to use (for converting, transacting, clicking on a monkey's butt, etc.). Your daily challenge, then, is to deliver the project on time while satisfying the client's visual, business and aesthetic requirements.

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The Designer Who Delivers

Whether you design and code websites all by yourself or run a small business with a pool of talent, you will always face the challenge of how much to work on a design and UI before passing the mock-ups on to the developer? Moreover, how much visual work needs to be done in order to effectively present a website to a client? In this article, we’ll talk about best practices for clear communication, which tools to use and how to manage resources on both small and large projects.

The Designer Who Delivers

As the owner of a small business, I have watched our company grow from a part-time, basement-dwelling, under-the-radar operation to a small business with an office, chairs, desks, and staplers (aren’t staplers an indication of legitimacy?). During this process of breaking out of our egg shell, we have birthed a company culture and a set of best practices, and we have gained valuable experience in the field of Web design and development. One of these nuggets of experience is acquiring the ability to save time and money by creating just the right amount of visual material to communicate clearly with both the client and website developer.

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