Author:

Bruce Lawson evangelises open web technologies for Opera. He co-authored Introducing HTML5, the best-selling book on HTML5 that has just been published in its second edition. He blogs at brucelawson.co.uk.

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Why We Shouldn’t Make Separate Mobile Websites

There has been a long-running war going on over the mobile Web: it can be summarized with the following question: "Is there a mobile Web?" That is, is the mobile device so fundamentally different that you should make different websites for it, or is there only one Web that we access using a variety of different devices? Acclaimed usability pundit Jakob Nielsen thinks that you should make separate mobile websites. I disagree.

Why We Shouldn't Make Separate Mobile Websites

Jakob Nielsen, the usability expert, recently published his latest mobile usability guidelines. He summarizes, "Good mobile user experience requires a different design than what's needed to satisfy desktop users. Two designs, two sites, and cross-linking to make it all work."

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HTML5: The Facts And The Myths

You can't escape it. Everyone's talking about HTML5. it's perhaps the most hyped technology since people started putting rounded corners on everything and using unnecessary gradients. In fact, a lot of what people call HTML5 is actually just old-fashioned DHTML or AJAX. Mixed in with all the information is a lot of misinformation, so here, JavaScript expert Remy Sharp and Opera's Bruce Lawson look at some of the myths and sort the truth from the common misconceptions.

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Once upon a time, there was a lovely language called HTML, which was so simple that writing websites with it was very easy. So, everyone did, and the Web transformed from a linked collection of physics papers to what we know and love today. Most pages didn't conform to the simple rules of the language (because their authors were rightly concerned more with the message than the medium), so every browser had to be forgiving with bad code and do its best to work out what its author wanted to display.

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