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An international Developer Evangelist working for Mozilla in the lovely town of London, England.

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Google Profile: https://plus.google.com/111552931212713155841/posts

Burning Excessive CodeThe Vanilla Web Diet

Editor's note: This is an introductory article about a book idea to be published by Smashing Magazine with Chris Heilmann. Check out what we propose as an idea — explaining a way to reconsider how we build websites to ensure they are leaner and more future-proof. At the end of the article, we'd ask you to fill out a quick survey to show your interest.

The Vanilla Web Diet

The Web as it is now is suffering from an obesity problem. If you surf the Web on a flaky mobile connection or some hotel wireless, you'll find yourself a lot of times staring at a page or app that doesn't do anything and doesn't tell you what is going on either. The spinner in the tab or the URL bar seems to be the thing that gets the most mileage in browsers.

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It’s Not All Doom And Gloom On The Web

In this article I'd like to discuss the changes happening on the Web and argue that its future is not as problematic and endangered as a lot of people make it out to be. The article is based on the talk I've presented at the Smashing Conference a couple of days ago, and you can also see the slides and watch the screencast.

Codecademy

I have been developing websites professionally for the greater part of the last 15 years, and written quite a few books and a lot of articles. Yet when I look around right now, I do feel incredibly... stupid and wonder if I should hang up my coat and do something else. Almost daily we see new tools, new best practices and systems to use, and a lot of them are very far removed from the original Web development technologies that are defined by the standards bodies.

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JavaScript Events And Responding To The User

Whenever people ask me about the most powerful things in JavaScript and the DOM, I quickly arrive at events. The reason is that events in browsers are incredibly useful. Furthermore, decoupling functionality from events is a powerful idea, which is why Node.js became such a hot topic.

Back To Basics: Events And Responding To The User

Today, let’s get back to the basics of events and get you in the mood to start playing with them, beyond applying click handlers to everything or breaking the Web with <a href="javascript:void(0)"> links or messing up our HTML with onclick="foo()" inline handlers (I explained in detail in 2005 why these are bad ideas).

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Teach Them How To Hit The Ground Running And Faceplant At The Same Time?

A few days ago, a tutorial on how to Create A Christmas Wish List With PHP was published on Smashing Magazine's Coding section that frustrated me. It frustrated me as it was incredibly easy to predict the comment reactions it caused. It also frustrated me as it was a classic example of a tutorial resulting in very happy readers who will go out and cause a lot of terrible things on the Web unless they understand that this was meant as a "beginner tutorial". A lot of the bad feedback was about security — something we shouldn't take lightly.

Teach Them How To Hit The Ground Running And Faceplant At The Same Time?

It frustrated me mostly because it all happened on Smashing Magazine, a well-respected online publication that is read by many beginners (especially in back-end technologies) and one that is dedicated to quality content with an advisory board (one of which is me) meaning that every article gets reviewed by experts before it is published. This one slipped by in the rush of the holidays, and it was updated a couple of hours after it was published, i.e. the editors added an editor's note and addressed some important missing points. I am happy that it was published in its original form as it inspired me to point out some things that I see happening in online magazines a lot lately.

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A Quick Look Into The Math Of Animations With JavaScript

In school, I hated math. It was a dire, dry and boring thing with stuffy old books and very theoretical problems. Even worse, a lot of the tasks were repetitive, with a simple logical change in every iteration (dividing numbers by hand, differentials, etc.). It was exactly the reason why we invented computers. Suffice it to say, a lot of my math homework was actually done by my trusty Commodore 64 and some lines of Basic, with me just copying the results later on.

Circle

These tools and the few geometry lessons I had gave me the time and inspiration to make math interesting for myself. I did this first and foremost by creating visual effects that followed mathematical rules in demos, intros and other seemingly pointless things. There is a lot of math in the visual things we do, even if we don’t realize it. If you want to make something look natural and move naturally, you need to add a bit of physics and rounding to it.

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Creating And Distributing Presentations On The Web

Delivering great presentations is an art, and preparing the slides for them very much so, too. But we’re not going to talk about that. We’re also not going to get into the debate about whether to use open or closed technologies to create slide decks — this is something you need to hash out yourself, and there are some interesting discussions going on.

Creating And Distributing Presentations On The Web

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What I will talk about is how I (and you, of course) can use the Web to find content for your talks, record them, share them with others and save them for future audiences. I’ll also explain how to share it all for free and how to convert closed formats into open ones by using the Web.

In 2010 I delivered a boatload of talks that people attended, downloaded, commented on and remixed for their own training sessions and presentations. I love to share my research and information, because when you set them free they can inspire and help others to get their own voices heard. Here’s how I did it.

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YQL: Using Web Content For Non-Programmers

Building a beautiful design is a great experience. Seeing the design break apart when people start putting in real content, though, is painful. That's why testing it as soon as possible with real information to see how it fares is so important. To this end, Web services provide us with a lot of information with which to fill our products. In recent years, this has been a specialist's job, but the sheer amount of information available and the number of systems to consume it makes it easier and easier to use Web services, even for people with not much development experience.

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The problem with APIs is that access to them varies in simplicity, from just having to load data from a URL all the way up to having to authenticate with the server and give all kinds of information about the application you want to build before getting your first chunk of information.

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Local Storage And How To Use It On Websites

Storing information locally on a user's computer is a powerful strategy for a developer who is creating something for the Web. In this article, we'll look at how easy it is to store information on a computer to read later and explain what you can use that for.

The main problem with HTTP as the main transport layer of the Web is that it is stateless. This means that when you use an application and then close it, its state will be reset the next time you open it. If you close an application on your desktop and re-open it, its most recent state is restored.

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This is why, as a developer, you need to store the state of your interface somewhere. Normally, this is done server-side, and you would check the user name to know which state to revert to. But what if you don't want to force people to sign up? This is where local storage comes in. You would keep a key on the user's computer and read it out when the user returns.

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Making Your Mark On The Web Is Easier Than You Think

We who work on the Web live in wonderful times. In the past, we did of lot of trial-and-error learning, and the biggest hurdle was getting people to understand what we were on about. Over time, companies like Google, Yahoo, Skype, Facebook and Twitter managed to get the geeky Web into the living rooms of regular people and into the headlines of the mainstream press.

Future of Web Design Conference in London, 2010
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Now more than ever are there opportunities on the Web for you, as a professional, to be seen and to be found. I am a professional Web spokesperson for a large company, and I spoke at 27 conferences in 14 countries last year. I write for several magazines and blogs and have published a few books. When people ask me how I got to where I am now, my standard answer is: by releasing stuff on the Web and by listening and reacting to feedback. And you can do the same.

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Seven JavaScript Things I Wish I Knew Much Earlier In My Career

I've been writing JavaScript code for much longer than I care to remember. I am very excited about the language's recent success; it's good to be a part of that success story. I've written dozens of articles, book chapters and one full book on the matter, and yet I keep finding new things. Here are some of the "aha!" moments I've had in the past, which you can try out rather than waiting for them to come to you by chance.

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Shortcut notations. One of the things I love most about JavaScript now is shortcut notations to generate objects and arrays. So, in the past when we wanted to create an object, we wrote...

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