Author:

Kat Neville is a freelance Canadian web designer (living in the UK) who is constantly coming up with too many ideas for new websites. She also loves arts and crafts, gardening and going on adventures. You can find her design work at safetygoat.co.uk.

Twitter: Follow Kat Neville on Twitter

Designing Style Guidelines For Brands And Websites

A website is never done. Everyone has worked on a project that changed so much after it launched that they no longer wanted it in their portfolio. One way to help those who take over your projects is to produce a style guide.

Edward Tufte once said: "Great design is not democratic; it comes from great designers. If the standard is lousy, then develop another standard." Although there's no stopping some clients from making their website awful, by creating a style guide, you're effectively establishing rules for those who take over from you.

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What Makes A Great Cover Letter, According To Companies?

Ah, the dreaded cover letter. Boring to write, difficult to get right, and you're usually preoccupied by other things (such as the portfolio and resume, which are also really important).  Unfortunately, your cover letter is a company's first exposure to you, and it determines whether your application is trashed or fast-tracked to the company's to-hire list.

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The status of the cover letter is changing in the Web industry. While a well-formed cover letter still has a place, some companies believe that Web folk who rely on this archaic tool never make it to the next round. But what do I know? Let's hear instead from some great Web and design agencies to get their advice on creating a great cover letter!

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The Art And Science Of The Email Signature

Email signatures are so easy to do well, that it's really a shame how often they're done poorly. Many people want their signature to reflect their personality, provide pertinent information and more, but they can easily go overboard. Why are email signatures important? They may be boring and the last item on your list of things to get right, but they affect the tone of every email you write.

All Image in The Art And Science Of The Email Signature

Email signatures contain alternative contact details, pertinent job titles and company names, which help the recipient get in touch when emails are not responded to. Sometimes, they give the recipient an idea of who wrote the email in case it has been a while since they have been in touch. They are also professional: like a letterhead, they show that you run a business (in some countries, you're required to do so). Here are some tips on how to create a tasteful signature that works.

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Invoice Like A Pro: Examples and Best Practices

Your invoice should be prim and proper, so that you can get paid by your clients efficiently. While invoicing is not a fun task, it's a necessary one: by keeping clients informed of your expectations, you will get paid punctually and reinforce your professionalism. After going over some best practices for creating invoices, we'll review some great (and not so great) online invoicing tools, so that you can spend less time creating invoices and more time doing the things you love!

nancy roy's invoice

Their details and yours. This is Mickey Mouse stuff, but you can't afford to forget it. In addition to the client's address, make sure to include the name of the client's contact person who handles your account! A company with three employees can figure out what you're doing; but in big companies, invoices get misplaced, especially if there's confusion over who belongs to which project.

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Business Card Design: Better Than A Plain Ol’ Business Card

Going to web conferences is a great opportunity to make new contacts and exchange business cards. Unfortunately, we have an industry filled with creative people who have no creative marketing for themselves. Sure, many have business cards, but one in a hundred have something really cool. These unique treasures, cards, items etc. get kept, talked about and usually photographed and shared. This post is an inspiration for all you creatives to step up your game, either by getting things made or by making them yourselves.

A note of warning though: interesting promotional materials almost always cost more per unit than a white business card or require a lot of prep work, so you're often going to have a limited quantity. Pick the people you give these treasures to wisely. Those people will feel more important for getting a limited edition, and you don't run the risk of spending an absolute fortune (in time or money) producing mass quantities!

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How To Create A Great Web Design CV and Résumé?

The economy is bad. No one's job is really 100% safe, so it’s time we all bucked up and got our recession bags packed (just in case!). Your portfolio is already gorgeous, but have you created a drool-worthy resume?

This flimsy one-page document is more important than many people think: the resume is the first portfolio piece that potential employers see, and if they're not impressed, chances are they won't look at the rest of your portfolio. "But I’m not a print designer!" you moan. It doesn’t matter, and I don’t want to hear your excuses! You need to conquer this, because if you’re a great Web designer, you don’t want your first impression to be mediocre.

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Everyone likes a competition. How about one in which ten good Web designers have to design the same resume in only a few hours? Meet Steven Stevenson, a fictional Web designer, doesn’t have a resume. Rules: each designer must translate his work experience, education and interests into their own unique style. Watch and learn, people. At the end is a summary of good tips for Web designer resumes. (If you're interested in taking the challenge yourself, check out misterstevenson.com for all the rules these designers followed, Steven Stevenson's raw data and the chance to add your own entry.)

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