Author:

Louis Rosenfeld wears two hats: he works as an information therapist for large, messy organizations with findability problems, like PayPal, Lowes, and Ford; and he’s founder of Rosenfeld Media, the user experience publishing house. A librarian by training, Lou is co-author of Information Architecture for the World Wide Web (O’Reilly; 3rd edition 2006) and Search Analytics For Your Site (Rosenfeld Media; 2011), co-founder of the Information Architecture Institute, and a former columnist for Internet World, CIO, and Web Review magazines. He blogs occasionally and tweets (@louisrosenfeld) frequently. If you liked this article, you really should attend Lou’s workshop on adaptive information architecture.

Stop Redesigning And Start Tuning Your Site Instead

In my nearly two decades as an information architect, I’ve seen my clients flush away millions upon millions of dollars on worthless, pointless, “fix it once and for all” website redesigns. All types of organizations are guilty: large government agencies, Fortune 500s, not-for-profits and (especially) institutions of higher education.

Stop Redesigning And Start Tuning Your Site

Worst of all, these offending organizations are prone to repeating the redesign process every few years like spendthrift amnesiacs. Sadly, redesigns rarely solve actual problems faced by end users. I’m frustrated because it really doesn’t have to be this way. Let’s look at why redesigns happen, and some straightforward and inexpensive ways we might avoid them.

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