Author:

Peter is a front-end technologist, developer, writer, speaker, and author of The Book of CSS3 and The Modern Web. He blogs at Broken Links and tweets as @stopsatgreen. He lives in London, England.

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A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

You’ve probably heard all the noise about Web Components and how they’re going to change Web development forever. If you haven’t, you’ve either been living under a rock, are reading this article by accident, or have a full, busy life which doesn’t leave you time to read about unstable and speculative Web technologies. Well, not me.

A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

Web Components are a suite of connected technologies aimed at making elements reusable across the Web. The lion’s share of the conversation has been around Shadow DOM, but probably the most transformative technology of the suite is Custom Elements, a method of defining your own elements, with their own behavior and properties.

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Adventures In The Third Dimension: CSS 3D Transforms

Back in 2009, the WebKit development team proposed a new extension to CSS that would allow Web page elements to be displayed and transformed on a three-dimensional plane. This proposal was called 3D Transforms, and it was soon implemented in Safari for Mac and iOS. About a year later, support followed for Chrome, and early in 2011, for Android. Outside of WebKit, however, none of the other browser makers seemed to show much enthusiasm for it, so it’s remained a fairly niche and underused feature.

Adventures In The Third Dimension: CSS 3D Transforms

That’s set to change, though, as the Firefox and Internet Explorer teams have decided to join the party by implementing 3D Transforms in pre-release versions of their browsers. So, if all goes according to plan, we’ll see them in IE 10 and a near-future version of Firefox (possibly 10 or 11, but that’s not confirmed yet), both of which are slated for release sometime this year.

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