Author:

Philip Tellis is a geek, speedfreak and Chief RUM Distiller at SOASTA where he works on the mPulse product. mPulse helps site owners measure the real user perceived performance of their sites and help visualize correlations between performance and business metrics like conversions, sales, lolcats and more. You can use mPulse for free at http://www.soasta.com/free.

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Analyzing Network Characteristics Using JavaScript And The DOM, Part 2

In Part 1 of this series, we had a look at how the underlying protocols of the Web work, and how we can use JavaScript to estimate their performance characteristics. In this second part, we’ll look at DNS, IPv6 and the new W3C specification for the NavigationTiming API.

Analyzing Network Characteristics Using JavaScript And The DOM, Part 2

Every device attached to the Internet is identified by a numeric address known as an IP address. The two forms of IP addresses seen on the open Internet are IPv4, which is a 32-bit number often represented as a series of four decimal numbers separated by dots, e.g. 80.72.139.101, and IPv6 which is a 128-bit number represented as a series of multiple hexadecimal numbers separated by colons, e.g. 2607:f298:1:103::c8c:a407.

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Analyzing Network Characteristics Using JavaScript And The DOM, Part 1

As Web developers, we have an affinity for developing with JavaScript. Whatever the language used in the back end, JavaScript and the browser are the primary language-platform combination available at the user’s end. It has many uses, ranging from silly to experience-enhancing.

In this article, we’ll look at some methods of manipulating JavaScript to determine various network characteristics from within the browser — characteristics that were previously available only to applications that directly interface with the operating system. Much of this was discovered while building the Boomerang project to measure real user performance.

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Common Security Mistakes in Web Applications

Web application developers today need to be skilled in a multitude of disciplines. It's necessary to build an application that is user friendly, highly performant, accessible and secure, all while executing partially in an untrusted environment that you, the developer, have no control over. I speak, of course, about the User Agent. Most commonly seen in the form of a web browser, but in reality, one never really knows what's on the other end of the HTTP connection.

http://xkcd.com/327/

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There are many things to worry about when it comes to security on the Web. Is your site protected against denial of service attacks? Is your user data safe? Can your users be tricked into doing things they would not normally do? Is it possible for an attacker to pollute your database with fake data? Is it possible for an attacker to gain unauthorized access to restricted parts of your site? Unfortunately, unless we're careful with the code we write, the answer to these questions can often be one we'd rather not hear.

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