Author:

Tim Wright is the Senior User Experience Designer and Developer at Fresh Tilled Soil, a UX design agency out of Boston, MA.

Tim is a frequent speaker, blogger, article writer, and published author. In fact, he recently wrote a book on JavaScript: Learning JavaScript: A Hands-On Guide to the Fundamentals of Modern JavaScript. You can find more of his writings at CSSKarma

Twitter: Follow Tim Wright on Twitter

Facebook: timwright12

Building A Relationship Between CSS & JavaScript

jQuery, Prototype, Node.js, Backbone.js, Mustache and thousands of JavaScript microlibraries all combine into a single undeniable fact: JavaScript is popular. It’s so popular, in fact, that we often find ourselves using it in places where another solution might be better in the long run.

Building A Relationship Between CSS & JavaScript

Even though we keep JavaScript, CSS and HTML in different files, the concepts behind progressive enhancement are getting all knotted up with every jQuery plugin we use and with every weird technique that crops up. Because JavaScript is so powerful, there are a lot of overlaps in capability between JavaScript and HTML (building document structure) and JavaScript and CSS (injecting style information).

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What You Need To Know About Behavioral CSS

As we move forward with the Web and browsers become capable of rendering more advanced code, we gradually get closer to the goal of universal standards across all platforms and computers. Not only will we have to spend less time making sure our box model looks right in IE6, but we create an atmosphere ripe for innovation and free of hacks and heavy front-end scripting.

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The Web is an extremely adaptive environment and is surrounded by a collaborative community with a wealth of knowledge to share. If we collectively want to be able to have rounded corners, we make it happen. If we want to have multiple background images, we make it happen. If we want border images, we make that happen, too. So desire is not the issue. If it was, we would all still be using tables to lay out our pages and using heavy over-the-top code. We all know that anything can be done on the Web.

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HTML5 and The Future of the Web

Some have embraced it, some have discarded it as too far in the future, and some have abandoned a misused friend in favor of an old flame in preparation. Whatever side of the debate you're on, you've most likely heard all the blogging chatter surrounding the "new hotness" that is HTML5. It's everywhere, it's coming, and you want to know everything you can before it's old news.

Things like jQuery plugins, formatting techniques, and design trends change very quickly throughout the Web community. And for the most part we've all accepted that some of the things we learn today can be obsolete tomorrow, but that's the nature of our industry.

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When looking for some stability, we can usually turn to the code itself as it tends to stay unchanged for a long time (relatively speaking). So when something comes along and changes our code, it's a big deal; and there are going to be some growing pains we'll have to work through. Luckily, rumor has it, that we have once less change to worry about.

In this article, I'm hoping to give you some tips and insight into HTML5 to help ease the inevitable pain that comes with transitioning to a slightly different syntax. Welcome to HTML5.

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