Category: Coding

This extended category features articles on client-side and server-side programming languages, tools, frameworks and libraries, as well as back-end issues. Experts and professionals reveal their coding tips, tricks and ideas. Curated by Dudley Storey and Rey Bango.
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Qualities Of Good Flux Implementations

It has been an exciting year for my team. Last year we kicked off a project using React, and over the course of the project we've learned a lot about React and Flux — Facebook's recommended architectural principles for React apps. In this article, we'll take a look at some of the key lessons we've learned.

Qualities Of Good Flux Implementations

Whether you're new to React and Flux, or going as far as building your own Flux implementation, I think you'll not only enjoy this journey with us, but find some thought-provoking questions and wisdom you can apply in your own endeavors.

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Responsive Typography With Sass Maps

Managing consistent, typographic rhythm isn’t easy, but when the type is responsive, things get even more difficult. Fortunately, Sass maps make responsive typography much more manageable.

Responsive Typography With Sass Maps

Writing the code is one thing, but keeping track of font-size values for each breakpoint is another — and the above is for paragraphs alone. Throw in h1 to h6s, each with variable font sizes for each breakpoint, and it gets cumbersome, especially when the type doesn’t scale linearly.

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The Making Of “In Pieces”: Designing an Interactive Exhibition With CSS Clip Paths

Web-based interactive experiences are widely used in the modern age for a variety of reasons, predominantly for the advertising of premium high-street products and services. After discovering the little-known clip-path property of CSS, I embarked upon a five-month interactive production journey of my own with a different purpose: to raise awareness of the struggles of 30 similarly little-known endangered species.

The Making Of 'In Pieces': Designing an Interactive Exhibition With CSS Clip Paths

This article explores the inspiration for the project and aspects of how different parts were built, and I’ll dive into how you can use this greatly underrated line of CSS for your own projects.

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The Art Of The SVG Filter And Why It Is Awesome

After almost 20 years of evolution, today's web typography, with its high-density displays and support for OpenType features, is just a step away from the typographic quality of the offline world. But there's still one field of graphic design where we still constantly fall back to bitmap replacements instead of using native text: display typography, the art of staging letters in illustrative, gorgeous, dramatic, playful, experimental or unexpected ways.

The Art Of The SVG Filter And Why It Is Awesome

Sure, we're able choose from thousands of web fonts and use CSS effects for type, some with wide browser support (like drop-shadows and 3D transforms) and others that are more experimental (like background-clip and text-stroke), but that's basically it. If we want really outstanding display typography on our websites, we'll usually embed it as an image.

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Creating Responsive Shapes With Clip-Path And Breaking Out Of The Box

CSSclip-path property is your ticket to shape-shifting the monotonous, boxy layouts traditionally associated with flat, responsive design. You will begin to think outside the box, literally, and hexagons, stars and octagons will begin to take form on your web pages. Once you get your hands dirty with clip-path, there’s no end to the shapes you can generate, simply by tweaking a few values.

Creating Responsive Shapes With Clip-Path And Breaking Out Of The Box

While the focus of this article is on clip-path using polygons with CSS, all of the demos provide a reference to an inline SVG, in order to gain additional support on Firefox. Generating a responsive SVG clipped shape is trivial once you have created a responsive shape with CSS’ clip-path. We’ll look at this in detail later.

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Designers And Developers: No Longer A House Divided

As the web continues to evolve at a breakneck, Moore’s-law pace, the divisions between traditional design and development are increasingly shifting. The “learn to code” movement is also gaining momentum among designers, but you’d be hard pressed to find a similarly strong movement for other disciplines within a team. Perhaps there should be.

Designers And Developers: No Longer A House Divided

We should all be striving to learn, but the question remains, what exactly should we learn? Maybe it isn’t as simple as “learn to develop” or “learn to design,” but is about learning to communicate and collaborate, to respect the nuances of each other’s craft — and the artistry and reason that they both demand in equal measure — without attempting to master it for oneself.

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Form Inputs: The Browser Support Issue You Didn’t Know You Had

The lowly form input. It’s been a part of HTML for as long as HTML has had a formal specification; but before HTML5, developers were hamstrung by its limited types and attributes. As the use of smartphones and their on-screen keyboards has flourished, however, inputs have taken on a new and incredibly important role — but they’re also riddled with browser and device inconsistencies. The eight original input types were brilliant in their simplicity. (Well, OK, maybe <input type="image"> hasn’t aged very well.)

Form Inputs: The Browser Support Issue You Didn’t Know You Had

Think about it: by inserting a single element in your markup, you can tell any web browser to render an interaction control, and you can completely modify that interaction – from a text field to a checkbox to a radio button – by simply changing a keyword. Now imagine a world where creating these interactions means also creating custom interaction controls, and you begin to realize how taken for granted inputs really are.

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Extending In Sass Without Creating A Mess

The @extend directive in Sass is a powerful directive that facilitates the sharing of rules and relationships between selectors. However, it can produce undesirable side effects if it is not carefully implemented. Thankfully, there are many strategies for using @extend effectively that can prevent these side effects and produce clean, organized CSS.

Extending In Sass Without Creating A Mess

By examining @extend in detail and exploring these various strategies, you can accurately predict exactly what happens when you use @extend, and make more informed decisions about when to use a @mixin and when to use @extend, to ensure optimal organization and to restrict unused styles in your style sheets.

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