Category: Coding

This extended category features articles on client-side and server-side programming languages, tools, frameworks and libraries, as well as back-end issues. Experts and professionals reveal their coding tips, tricks and ideas. Curated by Dudley Storey. Subscribe to the RSS-Feed.

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CSS Techniques JavaScript Tools Resources

Love Generating SVG With JavaScript? Move It To The Server!

I hope that by now, in 2014, there is no need to explain why SVG is a blessing to developers who want to ensure that their graphics look sharp on all devices, especially with their huge diversity of resolutions.

But just like any other technology, SVG has its limitations. And in this article, we’ll talk about how to bypass some of them. Well, what’s the problem? Why would you even need to generate SVG on the server? The technology is entirely client-side, so what would motivate anyone to move it from there?

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An Introduction To Node.js And MongoDB

Node.js is a rapidly growing technology that has been overtaking the world of server-side programming with surprising speed. MongoDB is a technology that’s revolutionizing database usage. Together, the two tools are a potent combination, thanks to the fact that they both employ JavaScript and JSON.

A Detailed Introduction To Node.js And MongoDB

At first glance, coming to grips with Node.js and MongoDB can seem both time-consuming and painful. Read on to learn how to wield these tools quickly and easily. Before getting started, let’s take a quick look at what this article offers.

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Moving A Git Repository To A New Server

Suppose your company decides to change its code-hosting provider or you wish to move your own Git repository to a different host. It doesn’t happen often, but it happens. When I had to move a number of Git projects to a new host, it took me quite some time to find an accurate method.

Moving A Git Repository To A New Server

Having made many attempts, and a couple of fails, and carefully reading Git’s documentation, I found a solid and effective way. I thought, then, that every developer would benefit from knowing how to migrate a Git repository to a new host quickly and easily. The most important thing is to make sure that your branches and tags and your commit history are all moved.

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Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

On Monday, we published an article on Picturefill 2.0, a perfect polyfill for responsive images. Today's article complements Tim Wright's article and explains exactly how we can use the upcoming <picture> element and srcset, with simple fallbacks for legacy browsers. There is no reason to wait for responsive images; we can actually have them very, very soon. — Ed.

Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

Images are some of the most important pieces of information on the web, but over the web’s 25-year history, they haven’t been very adaptable at all. Everything about them has been stubbornly fixed: their size, format and crop, all set in stone by a single src.

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Picturefill 2.0: Responsive Images And The Perfect Polyfill

Not since the early days of web standards have I seen our community rally around a seemingly small issue: responsive images. Over the last four years (yeah, it’s been about four years), we’ve seen many permutations of images in responsive design.

Responsive Images And The Perfect Polyfill

From the lazier days of setting max-width: 100% (the absolute minimum you should be doing) to more full-featured JavaScript implementations, such as Picturefill and Zurb’s data-interchange method, we’ve spent a lot of time spinning our wheels, banging our heads and screaming at the wall. I’m happy to say that our tireless journey is coming to a close. The W3C and browser makers got the hint.

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Unicode For A Multi-Device World

A while ago, I was working on a website that required a number of icons. “No problem,” I thought. “I know how to handle this. I’ll use an @font-face icon set for high-resolution screens. It’ll be a single file, to reduce HTTP requests, and I’ll include just the icons that I need, to reduce file size.”

Unicode For A Multi-Device World

“I’ll even use a Unicode character as the base of the icon, so that if @font-face isn’t supported, then the user will still see something like the intended icon.” I felt pretty pleased with myself.

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Cache Invalidation Strategies With Varnish Cache

Phil Karlton once said, "There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things." This article is about the harder of these two: cache invalidation. It’s directed at readers who already work with Varnish Cache. To learn more about it, you’ll find background information in “Speed Up Your Mobile Website With Varnish.”

varnish-cache

10 microseconds (or 250 milliseconds): That’s the difference between delivering a cache hit and delivering a cache miss. How often you get the latter will depend on the efficiency of the cache — this is known as the “hit rate.” A cache miss depends on two factors: the volume of traffic and the average time to live (TTL), which is a number indicating how long the cache is allowed to keep an object. As system administrators and developers, we can’t do much about the traffic, but we can influence the TTL.

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