Category: Mobile

This category features articles on best and emerging practices for responsive website design, Web apps and native apps. While the mobile Web is still in it’s infancy, we can learn from the experiences of professionals who are working on mobile every day. Curated by Derek Allard. Subscribe to the RSS-Feed.

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Responsive Web Design Apps Techniques iOS User Experience

Next-Generation Responsive Web Design Tools: Webflow, Edge Reflow, Macaw

To prepare for a talk about the changing roles of designers and developers, given at HOW Interactive a few months back, I interviewed 20+ web shops. Validated by my own experience, I found that many of them faced challenges fitting responsive design into their workflow, and the role of most web designers had changed to include coding in some form or another.

Next-Generation Responsive Web Design Tools: Webflow, Edge Reflow, Macaw

At least half of the designers knew HTML and CSS well but wanted a more visual way to get at it. Well, a new generation of visual responsive design tools has arrived. These responsive design tools are for anyone who understands HTML and CSS (or is willing to learn) and wants to visually design a responsive website — and have code to show for it.

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Mobile And Accessibility: Why You Should Care And What You Can Do About It

Mobile has revolutionized the way we use the web. This is especially true of disabled users, for whom mobile devices open the door to a whole new spectrum of interactions.

Mobile And Accessibility: Why You Should Care And What You Can Do About It

And they are taking advantage of it. A July 2013 survey (PDF) of adults with disabilities done by the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center found that 91% of people with disabilities use a “wireless device such as a cell phone or tablet.” Among these users, screen reader usage is common, even on mobile devices.

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Team Collaboration And Closing Efficiency Gaps In Responsive Design

Responsive design ushers in complexities that require a more involved design and implementation process. Because of this, the effort has piled up on the front end. Working in silos, where you talk to each other only occasionally or during scheduled meetings, has too many unknowns. Let's look at how these new challenges create opportunities to work together better.

Team Collaboration And Closing Efficiency Gaps In Responsive Design

We have to kill the mentality that there is an assembly line of workers waiting for it to be their turn, and instead embrace more focused collaboration across the project’s entire team.

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Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

On Monday, we published an article on Picturefill 2.0, a perfect polyfill for responsive images. Today's article complements Tim Wright's article and explains exactly how we can use the upcoming <picture> element and srcset, with simple fallbacks for legacy browsers. There is no reason to wait for responsive images; we can actually have them very, very soon. — Ed.

Responsive Images Done Right: A Guide To <picture> And srcset

Images are some of the most important pieces of information on the web, but over the web’s 25-year history, they haven’t been very adaptable at all. Everything about them has been stubbornly fixed: their size, format and crop, all set in stone by a single src.

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Unicode For A Multi-Device World

A while ago, I was working on a website that required a number of icons. “No problem,” I thought. “I know how to handle this. I’ll use an @font-face icon set for high-resolution screens. It’ll be a single file, to reduce HTTP requests, and I’ll include just the icons that I need, to reduce file size.”

Unicode For A Multi-Device World

“I’ll even use a Unicode character as the base of the icon, so that if @font-face isn’t supported, then the user will still see something like the intended icon.” I felt pretty pleased with myself.

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Rebuilding An HTML5 Game In Unity

When our HTML5 game Numolition was nearly done, we decided to throw it all away and rebuild it in Unity. That turned out to be an exciting and valuable experience, and one that I thought would be worth sharing with other Web developers. Come in, the water’s warm!

Why We Rebuilt Our HTML5 Game In Unity

Last year, we released a mobile game named Quento. It was written entirely in HTML5, wrapped in our proprietary PhoneGap alternative and launched in many app stores with mild success. The game caused me to jot down a few spinoff ideas. One that I particularly liked was a game with a stack of numbered tiles in which the player has to clear a level by combining numbers and tapping groups to make them disappear.

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Rethinking Mobile Tutorials: Which Patterns Really Work?

Pattern libraries are a great source of inspiration and education for designers. But common practice doesn’t always equal best practice. In this post, we’ll look at why many common tutorial patterns are ineffective and how you can leverage game design principles to increase user engagement.

Rethinking Mobile Tutorials: Which Patterns Really Work?

After the release of the first edition of Mobile Design Pattern Gallery, Intuit asked me to speak with its mobile team. I spoke at a high level about the value of patterns across industries (fashion, architecture, software and others) and how they are a useful teaching tool.

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