Category: UX Design

This category features quality articles on usability, information architecture, interaction design and other user experience (UX) related topics – for digital (Web, mobile, applications, software) and physical products. Through these articles, experts and professionals share with you their valuable ideas, practical tips, useful guidelines, recommended best practices and great case studies. Curated by Chui Chui Tan. Subscribe to the RSS-Feed.

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Usability User Experience Interaction Design UI User Research

A Roadmap To Becoming An A/B Testing Expert

A/B testing, also known as split testing, is the method of pitting two versions of a landing page against each other in a battle of conversion. You test to see which version does a better job of leading visitors to one of your goals, like signing up or subscribing to a newsletter. You can test two entirely different designs for a landing page or you can test small tweaks, like changes to a few words in your copy.

Roadmap To Becoming An A/B Testing Expert

Running A/B tests on your website can help you improve your communication with visitors and back up important design decisions with real data from real users. With the multitude of tools available (detailed later), split testing has become easy for even non-technical people to design and manage.

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Facing Your Fears: Approaching People For Research

When working on a project, have you ever felt that you and the rest of the team were making a lot of decisions based on assumptions? Having to make choices with limited information is not unusual — especially in complex projects or with brand new products.

Facing Your Fears: Approaching People For Research

Phrases like “We think people will use this feature because of X” or “We believe user group Y will switch to this product” become part of the early deliberation on what to develop and how to prioritize.

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What Is The Most Underrated Word In Web Design?

An "affordance" is a perceived signal or clue that an object may be used to perform a particular action. A chair sits at around knee height and appears to provide support. It affords sitting. A toothbrush has a handle a little longer than the human palm. It affords gripping.

What Is The Most Underrated Word In Web Design?

All of the objects that surround us have affordances: some are explicit (the “Push” sign above a door handle), and others are hidden (a chair could be used to break a window or used as a weapon). The term was first coined by psychologist James G. Gibson, then introduced to human-computer interaction by Donald Norman in his book The Psychology of Everyday Things, required reading for budding industrial and product designers everywhere.

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A User In Total Control Is A Designer’s Nightmare

How do you balance the creative control you give to the users, the usability of the product they make with your tool and the flexibility of that tool? We designers have always had a problem of handing over creative control to the general population — the basic users. There are two reasons for this.

A User In Total Control Is A Designer's Nightmare

The first is obvious: We are the ones who are supposed to know the principles of design and usability. Some of us were born with this feeling of what feels and looks right, while other designers have learned it — at least good designers eventually have.

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The Last Goodbye: How To Shut Down A Failing Product

The true power of the web has always depended on the open nature of its technology. Anyone who’s interested can create a website, and anyone with an idea could turn out the next Facebook. Technology takes no heed of gender, creed or race, but is reduced down to code and the desire to create.

The Last Goodbye: How To Shut Down A Failing Product

This great power has produced unbounded enthusiasm, and everyone you meet has an idea for the “next great website or app.” Buried within this enthusiasm, however, is the harsh reality that many new products fail. But what should you do if your product does fail? How do you close a product with dignity, so that both you and your users leave on good terms?

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Boardroom Comics: A Business-Scenario Visualization Tool For Executives

As a UX researcher, I'm always looking for novel ways to present information to the different audiences I work for. My collaborators and clients aren't limited to UX designers, software developers and UI visual designers.

Boardroom Comics: A Business-Scenario Visualization Tool For Executives

I regularly conduct studies for executives who are responsible for business strategy, product planning, operations, sales and marketing, and professional education. At the conclusion of each study, my challenge is to create a final deliverable tailored to a specialized audience.

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Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 2: Navigation Systems

How do we make navigation as simple and predictable as possible? As explained in part 1 of this series, the first two steps are to structure content in a way that naturally narrows the navigation options, and to explain those options in a way that minimizes the cognitive load on users.

Efficiently Simplifying Navigation, Part 2: Navigation Systems

However, two more steps are required — namely, to choose the right type of navigation menu, and then to design it. The second part of this series addresses the third step and discusses which type of navigation menu is best suited to which content.

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