Category: WordPress

This extended category features quality articles about developing clean, smart and fast websites with WordPress. The articles are intermediate level, with an emphasis on practical, hands-on discussions related to WordPress. Curated by Daniel Pataki. Subscribe to the RSS-Feed.

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Integrating Amazon S3 With WordPress

Computing is full of buzzwords, “cloud computing” being the latest one. But unlike most trends that fizzle out after the initial surge, cloud computing is here to stay. This article goes over Amazon’s S3 cloud storage service and guides you to implementing a WordPress plugin that backs up your WordPress database to Amazon’s S3 cloud. Note that this is not a tutorial on creating a WordPress plugin from scratch, so some familiarity with plugin development is assumed.

The reason for using Amazon S3 to store important data follows from the “3-2-1” backup rule, coined by Peter Krogh. According to the 3-2-1 rule, you would keep three copies of any critical data: the original data, a backup copy on removable media, and a second backup at an off-site location (in our case, Amazon’s S3 cloud).

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How WordPress Took The CMS Crown From Drupal And Joomla

According to W3Techs, almost 55% of the 1 million most visited websites that are run on a content management system (CMS) are run on WordPress. WordPress is a darn fine CMS and is stable and easy to use, but so are Joomla and Drupal. So, why does WordPress have the lion’s share of the top 1 million websites?

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This article does not set out to prove that one CMS is “better” than another. WordPress, Joomla, Drupal and dozens of other platforms are mature, stable, great CMS’ that can do a fantastic job in most cases.

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How To Improve Your WordPress Plugin’s Readme.txt

If you’re a plugin developer and you just love to write code, then writing a readme.txt file for a plugin in WordPress’ repository might be your idea of hell. When you’ve written all of that lovely code, why must you spend time writing about how to use it?

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Unfortunately, some plugin developers view writing a readme.txt file as the least important part of their job. So, we end up with things like the following.

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WordPress Multisite: Practical Functions And Methods

Multisite is a powerful new feature that arrived with the release of WordPress 3.0. It allows website managers to host multiple independent websites with a single installation of WordPress. Although each “website” in a network is independent, there are many ways to share settings, code and content throughout the entire network.

WordPress Multisite: Practical Functions And Methods

Since the beginning of the year, I’ve been developing themes and plugins for a WordPress Multisite-powered content network. During that time I’ve learned many powerful tips and tricks unique to Multisite. This guide will introduce you to a few Multisite-specific functions, along with real-world programming examples that you can begin using today. Hopefully, it will open your eyes to a few of the new possibilities available in Multisite.

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Getting Started With bbPress

Forums have been around forever, so it should come as no surprise that several plugins for the popular publishing platform WordPress provide this feature, as well as support for integrating other forum software. One project, however, has a special place in the WordPress community, and that is bbPress. This is the software created by WordPress founder, Matt Mullenweg, as a lightweight system for the Wordpress.org support forums. In true open-source fashion, the bbPress project was born (at bbpress.org, of course) as a lightweight standalone alternative for forums.

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The problem is that the project never really kept up the pace; and while the WordPress community wanted to use it, and bbPress saw some promising spurts of development, it never really caught up to the alternatives. Most of us who needed a forum went either with a plugin alternative that integrated perfectly or with forum software such as Vanilla.

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Securing Your WordPress Website

Security has become a foremost concern on the Web in the past few years. Hackers have always been around, but with the increase in computer literacy and the ease of access to virtually any data, the problem has increased exponentially. It is now rare for a new website to not get comment spam within days of its release, even if it is not promoted at all.

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This increase in naughty behavior, however, has spurred developers to write better code, and framework vendors have implemented many functions to help coders in their battle against the dark side.

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Writing WordPress Guides For The Advanced Beginner

Creating WordPress tutorials is a fantastic way to help build the WordPress community and to increase your Web traffic. That’s no secret. Just Google “wordpress tutorial” and you’ll see hundreds of results. The complete novice will find scores of well-written tutorials clearly demonstrating the basics of the WordPress dashboard and of activating the default template, in simple jargon-free language.

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Unfortunately, after the first few “Hello World!” tutorials, they are in for a bit of a learning curve. Suddenly, the guides start to skip a lot of details, assuming that the reader “already knows this stuff.” Others are simply written exclusively for advanced WordPress users. So, where does a new developer go after square one?

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Create Native Admin Tables In WordPress The Right Way

WordPress list tables are a very common element of the WordPress admin interface but creating one of those tables is not really an intuitive thing to do when you haven’t done it before. In this article, we’ll see how to generate some native admin tables the right way.

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In this article, we’ll see how WordPress provides functionality that can be used to generate native admin tables. We’ll look at a typical WordPress table and its different components and show how to implement it the right way.

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Building WordPress Themes You Can Sell

When I took my first steps into the WordPress theme arena, I didn’t know much about it. I wandered blindly into the business, not knowing whether I was doing things correctly. Over time, through trial and error and making rookie mistakes, I learned some valuable lessons and gained important insights. To save you from going down the same winding path, I’ll share some of the important takeaways that I’ve learned so far, like how to gain a solid user base, what to include in your themes and, most importantly, what to leave out.

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You could build the best WordPress theme in the world, but it won’t matter unless people know about it and use it. One of the smartest things I did when starting my theme business was to release a free theme. It took a while for it to gain traction, but things took off once it got some attention from being featured on other websites. Consumers are willing to download a free theme from the new kid on the block and try it out because hardly any financial risk is involved.

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Theme Review: Garnish

Finding a minimal WordPress theme that delivers a rich media experience can be challenging. You don’t want it to be so vanilla that it gets lost in the crowd, but it shouldn’t be so different that it causes usability issues or appears thrown together. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve landed on a website that looks like it has just woken up after a long night on the town — it ain’t pretty! Bad design could very well mean bad business, and in this economy, good business matters more than ever before.

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If you are in the market for a minimal WordPress theme, you first need to determine how bare you can go without sacrificing functionality. Focus on the structure, visual presentation and usability of the theme, even if that means setting aside some of your own aesthetic preferences. Your website should of course reflect who you are, but does it really need to be hot pink from top to bottom with lime-green font and 300 drop-shadows? I hate to break it to the eccentrics out there, but, alas, it does not. You would only be putting more money in the pockets of eye doctors. So, the question is, how do you get viewers and prospective clients to feel comfy in your digital world, while keeping everyone’s vision intact? The answer is to keep it simple and choose wisely.

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