BlendMe.in: Accessing Vector Icons Without Leaving Photoshop

Update (10.10.2013): Please note that the ZIP file has been updated after this article has been published. In case Photoshop should crash on your end, please rename your Photoshop settings folder to fix this. You can find the configuration folder here: /Users/[Username]/Library/Preferences/Adobe Photoshop CC Settings. Please note that this will reset all Photoshop settings to default. If you should still happen to run into any issues, please kindly send an email to contact@blendme.in. Thank you for your understanding and support. – Ed.

Here at Smashing Magazine, we're very fond of the creativity and mutual support of the Web design community. Today, we're proud to feature a free Photoshop extension, BlendMe.in, that will help everyone access those font icons they need without even leaving Photoshop. Enjoy!

BlendMe.in: Accessing Vector Icons Without Leaving Photoshop

There is no doubt that the Web is full of websites that are packed with free icon packs, and that doesn't necessarily make it easier for designers to find their way around when they're looking for a particular icon for a particular project. When you're in your creative zone and have an idea about something that would perfectly fit in your design, you don't have time to waste and struggle with finding the right asset.

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Data-Driven Design In The Real World

As more designers and writers look to analytics to inform their decisions, many still struggle to implement their findings in a sustainable, ongoing way. Too often, testing and analysis are one-off activities, providing plenty of important-looking numbers but not lot of context or specific direction.

Data-Driven Design In The Real World

After more than five years helping content and design teams capture, measure and understand website performance data (client-side at Bazaarvoice and now at Volusion), I’ve learned a lot about connecting the dots between data and design improvements. Today, I want to share some of those lessons with you.

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Responsive Image Container: A Way Forward For Responsive Images?

The aim of republishing the original article by Yoav is to raise awareness and support the discussion about solutions for responsive images. We look forward to your opinions and thoughts in the comments section! – Ed.

It’s been a year since I last wrote about it, but the dream of a “magical” image format that will solve world hunger and/or the responsive images problem (whichever comes first) lives on. A few weeks back, I started wondering if such an image format could be used to solve both the art direction and resolution-switching use cases.

Responsive Image Container: A Way Forward For Responsive Images?

I had a few ideas on how this could be done, so I created a prototype to prove its feasibility. The prototype is now available, ready to be tinkered with. In this post, I’ll explain what this prototype does, what it cannot do, how it works, and its advantages and disadvantages relative to markup solutions.

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A Five-Step Process For Conducting User Research

Imagine that this is what you know about me: I am a college-educated male between the ages of 35 and 45. I own a MacBook Pro and an iPhone 5, on which I browse the Internet via the Google Chrome browser. I tweet and blog publicly, where you can discover that I like chocolate and corgis. I’m married. I drive a Toyota Corolla. I have brown hair and brown eyes. My credit-card statement shows where I’ve booked my most recent hotel reservations and where I like to dine out.

A Five-Step Process For Conducting User Research

If your financial services client provided you with this data, could you tell them why I’ve just decided to move my checking and savings accounts from it to a new bank? This scenario might seem implausible when laid out like this, but you’ve likely been in similar situations as an interactive designer, working with just demographics or website usage metrics.

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Optimizing The Design Workflow With Fireworks Extensions

In my previous article on Smashing Magazine, I discussed seven excellent extensions that could fundamentally change your Web design workflow in Adobe Fireworks. The extensions expand Fireworks’ capabilities by adding valuable functionality that could make a huge impact on your overall productivity as a designer.

Optimizing The Design Workflow With Extensions, Part 2

I have to admit, though, that at the time, I was able only to scratch the surface of what’s possible with Fireworks, so I’d like to add to the list six more extensions. As functionality, they are a bit more “niche” than the extensions in the previous set, but no less valuable in any sense.

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Good Content Is Too Valuable To Die

When I started developing websites back in the day, I was lucky to have hundreds of valuable, practical articles that would help me become better at what I did. I could learn day and night, and whenever I discovered a new tool or technique, I would bookmark it on Delicious for future reference. I knew the value of each article and of each bookmark, and I kept revisiting and carefully tagging them for months and months — almost every day.

Good Content Is Too Valuable To Die

Years have passed. The landscape has changed. Blogs have emerged and new publications have appeared. Some magazines were discontinued yet remained fully available online (Pingmag and good ol' Digital-Web, for example). At that point, maintaining a backup of online articles obviously didn't even cross my mind. For a year or so, I even stopped bookmarking articles since I could always find them via Google, of course. I was naive and stupid.

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Building An Online Magazine App For Windows 8, Part 1: The HTML5 App

Back in 2010, Microsoft shifted its focus from propriety Web technology to open Web technology. The first fruits of this refocus materialized a few years later — in Internet Explorer, the Windows operating system, its developer tools and its cloud software.

Building An Online Magazine App For Windows 8, Part 1: The HTML5 App

Things have changed for the better so far: With version 10, Internet Explorer has finally grown up and become a fast modern browser. You can build native Windows apps with JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS — apps that look and feel solid and have modern user interfaces.

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