WordPress: How It Came To Be And Where It’s Heading

2013 was a busy year for me for conferences and travel. It was also the year I attended my first (and second) WordCamp. The first was WordCamp UK in July, where I met Mike Little, one of the two co-founders of WordPress.

Interview With Matt Mullenweg And Mike Little — WordPress: How It Came To Be And Where It's Heading

Three months later, I was honored to meet the other co-founder, Matt Mullenweg, twice in three weeks: at WordCamp Europe in Leiden, and at The Summit. I was lucky enough to have both Matt and Mike participate in interviews for this post about WordPress, including its history, community and future.

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Kickstart Your Project With INIT And Grunt

Whenever you start a project, you have to repeat certain tasks and set up certain structures: create new folders, choose a framework, set up your development tasks. But configuring settings once and reusing them would be simpler.

Kickstart Your Project With INIT And Grunt

An easy way to achieve this is by using some kind of generator — for example, Yeoman Generator — or tools such as INIT, which can perfectly coexist with and even be used through a generator.

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Responsive Design Frameworks: Just Because You Can, Should You?

Responsive design is about building a website with a grid-based layout, images that resize and media queries, as described by Ethan Marcotte. After Marcotte defined the technique, responsive design frameworks began to emerge that incorporated these principles.

Responsive Design Frameworks: Just Because You Can, Should You?

Mostly based on CSS and JavaScript, many of these frameworks are open-source, free to download and quickly customizable. Some of the most popular today are Bootstrap and Foundation, which we’ll focus on in this article. As responsive design frameworks became popular, a big debate emerged: Why would a professional designer use a responsive design framework?

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A Type Design Brief: What Is In It, And Why Does It Matter?

Type design is equal parts suffering and euphoria. It is a walk along a winding road that goes on for many weeks and months before it’s done. A type design brief is like a charter path: It asks you questions, and the answers will guide you to where you want to be.

A Type Design Brief: What Is In It, And Why Does It Matter?

It will not make the walk much shorter, but the chances of getting lost will be much lower. Below are six questions that will shape the typeface through its first moments of creation and serve as guiding principles through the various stages of the design.

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How To Make An Effective Style Guide With Adobe Fireworks

I started with style guides like any other obsessive-compulsive designer: with the desire to make it simple to maintain and grow a design. Plus, knowing which component to use in a given situation is nice, too, right? Since making this a regular practice, I’ve found it’s been like having a nice combination of a CSS class and a pattern library all in one.

How To Make An Effective Style Guide With Adobe Fireworks

One of the first questions, understandably, is why use Fireworks for a style guide? Well, for me, it’s mostly because of symbols and styles. Sure, you could use similar things in Photoshop, but I find Fireworks’ implementation to be smarter.

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Useful Learning Resources For Web Designers

Fortunately, learning is not limited to only a small minority of people anymore; it is not even limited to visiting a school or a university. The Internet makes it possible for us to distribute knowledge at a small price, and is full of resources to expand everyone's knowledge on an enormous variety of topics.

Useful Learning Resources For Web Designers

Since learning is a lifelong task that doesn't stop after pursuing a certain academic certificate, this round-up is not only dedicated to beginners. It's for everyone who wants to become an expert in a certain field or is simply curious about the Web and the latest tools and techniques around them.

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Creating A Client-Side Shopping Cart

Session storage is a new feature introduced by the W3C’s “Web Storage” specification. It’s supported in Internet Explorer 8+, Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera Desktop (for a complete list, please consult “Can I Use”).

var total = parseInt( sessionStorage.getItem( "total" ) );
var quantity = 2;
var updatedTotal = total * quantity;
sessionStorage.setItem( "total", updatedTotal ); // '240', a string

In this series of articles, we’ll cover in depth a practical implementation of session storage by creating a complete e-commerce shopping cart with the sessionStorage object and jQuery.

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