Smashing Newsletter Christmas Issue #1

Merry Christmas!

This is the first of the three special Christmas issues for the fading 2011. The first 2012 newsletter issue will be sent out on January 10th.

Christmas is coming, and the year is slowly coming to an end. This year, we’ve published 234 articles written by professional designers and developers. We’ve changed a lot in terms of editorial publishing, quality control as well as heartily welcomed new authors. Marc Edwards’ article on Pixel Perfection in Photoshop was just one of the many articles that received fantastic feedback in 2011. We are happy to present it to you together with regular newsletter posts as a reminder of the fading year.

Note: The piece is one of the many excellent articles featured within our Smashing Creative Bundle (look out for the Smashing Christmas Special1 deal on Monday, December 19th!). You might also be interested in the Smashing WordPress Bundle2 which we’ve put together for you today.

Table of Contents

01. Pixel Perfection In Photoshop3
02. User Interface Design Patterns4
03. Iconic Tribute5

1. Pixel Perfection In Photoshop

When creating Web and app interfaces, most designers slave over every single pixel, making sure it’s got exactly the right color, texture and position. If you’re not careful, though, some common functions like moving, rotating and pasting can undo your hard work, resulting in a blurry mess. But with some small changes to your workflow, you should be able to maintain the highest-quality artwork from the start to the end of the project.

Pixel-Perfect Rotation

If you’re not careful, rotating layers in Photoshop can damage them in a very noticeable, pixel-mashing way.

When rotating layers with Free Transform (and some other tools) to exactly 90 or 270°, the quality of the outcome is determined by the layer’s size. If the layer is of an even width and even height, then you’ll be fine. If it’s of an odd width and odd height, you’ll also be okay. But if they’re of an odd width by even height or even width by odd height, then you’ll see something like the result below:

Pixel Rotation Screnshot6

In this case, the artwork is 20 × 9 pixels: even-by-odd dimensions. The results for bitmap layers and vector layers are different, but they both produce unusable results because the origin of rotation doesn’t fall on an exact pixel boundary.

A Fix

Because even-by-odd or odd-by-even dimensions are the problem, we need a way to ensure that the contents of the layer are odd-by-odd or even-by-even. Probably any method you can think of will solve this problem, be it adding a square bitmap mask to a layer or adding more content to the layer that you’re rotating. You could also draw a square on another layer and rotate both at once.

As long as the dimensions for the layer or layers are even-by-even or odd-by-odd, it’ll be fine.

Square Selection Screenshot7

An Easier Fix

Rotation Origin Screenshot

Changing the origin of rotation to the top left (or any other corner) will ensure it is on a pixel boundary, guaranteeing perfect results every time. To do this, click on a corner origin after selecting the Free Transform tool, but before rotating. This works brilliantly and is the simplest solution yet.

Bitmap and vector masks are affected by this issue as well, so please take care. But the issue affects only rotated layers, either via “Free Transform” or “Transform” under the Edit menu. Rotating the entire canvas via Image → Image Rotation has no problem.

To make things even easier, I’ve created some Photoshop Actions and Workflows8 that take care of everything for you.

Pixel-Perfect Vector Pasting

If you’ve drawn pixel-snapped artwork in Illustrator and pasted it into Photoshop as a shape layer, you may have noticed that the result is not quite what you expect (i.e. a perfectly sharp image), but rather a blurry mess. Here’s how to fix that.

Below is some artwork as it appears in Illustrator: perfectly formed, snapped to the pixel grid, and at the size we intend to use it in Photoshop.

Illustrator Vector9

Below are the same paths pasted into Photoshop a few times. Notice how only the top-left version is sharp, while the others are half a pixel out on the x axis, y axis or both.

Pasting Result

What Went Wrong?

Photoshop’s pasting behavior works in one of two ways. If you’ve made a selection, then the clipboard’s contents are pasted so that the center of the clipboard is aligned with the center of the selection. If a selection hasn’t been made, then the contents are pasted so that the center of the clipboard aligns with the center of your current view. The level you’re zoomed into and the portion of the document you’re viewing determines the result.

A Fix

Our test artwork is 32 pixels wide by 12 pixels high. Drawing a 32 × 12 marquee selection in Photoshop forces the artwork to land exactly where we want it and to be pixel-aligned. This works every single time.

An Easier Fix

The marquee doesn’t have to be the exact size of your artwork, though. In our case, a 2 × 2-pixel selection would work just as well, because the center of an even-width-and-height marquee selection and the center of even-width-and-height clipboard contents would fall exactly on a pixel boundary, which is what we want. If the artwork was an odd width and height, then a 1 × 1 selection would have been required.

A simple fix

If you couldn’t be bothered noting your artwork’s dimensions, then by drawing an appropriately sized marquee, you can draw a 2 × 2-pixel selection and paste. If the image is blurry on the x axis only, make the selection 1 × 2 and paste again. If the image is blurry on the y axis only, make the selection 2 × 1 and paste again. If the image is blurry on both axes, make the selection 1 × 1 and paste again.

It may sound complex, but in practice it’s very quick; you’ll only ever have to paste twice to get sharp vector paths from Illustrator.

Smart Objects

Pasting elements as smart objects doesn’t come with the same issue (at least not in Photoshop CS5 anyway). I like to use Shape layers, though: they allow more control and editability and have better anti-aliasing.

Pixel-Perfect Vector Nudging

When nudging vector points, Photoshop exhibits some strange behavior, related to how far you’re zoomed in. At 100%, nudging with the arrow keys will move your vector point exactly 1 pixel. At 200%, nudging moves the point by half a pixel. At 300%, it moves by a third of a pixel.

The behavior seems intentional, but it’s not usually what I’m after. Most of the time, I want to nudge in whole pixel increments. Here’s how you can do that, without zooming out to 100%.

Open your document, and then create a second window by going to Window → Arrange → New Window. You can then resize the new window and place it out of the way.

Nudging Menu Bar10
Large view11

Edit in the other window as normal, zooming in as far as you’d like. You’ll now be able to press Command + ` to switch back to the window that’s zoomed to 100%, nudge using the arrow keys, and then press Command + ` to switch back again. Because the other window is zoomed to 100%, nudging will move the selected vector points exactly 1 pixel.

Nudging Windows12
Large view13

Please note that holding Shift while using the arrow keys to nudge always moves by 10 pixels, no matter how far in you’re zoomed. Also, dragging points with the mouse will snap to pixels in most situations — most, but not all.

While not perfect, this technique does remove some of the frustration with editing detailed vector paths in Photoshop. Or maybe it’s just another reason why complex shapes should be drawn in Illustrator first, and then pasted as shape layers?

Take Charge Of Your Pixels

Using the correct techniques, it should be easy to place pixels exactly where you want. Remember, you’re the one in charge. Demand that they fall in line. Accept nothing less than pixel perfection.

This article was published on 14th of April 2011. Permalink14.

2. User Interface Design Patterns

Everyone tends to save bookmarks or keeps a secret folder saved somewhere on their computers where they look to when searching for inspiration for upcoming projects. If you are looking for some user interface solutions, maybe UI Parade15 is just for you.

UI Design16

User Interface Design Inspiration provides many examples of small details used to design interfaces. Buttons, forms, menus, search boxes, knobs, glyphs and icons, and much more, can be downloaded for free. Make sure to pass by and add more creative things to your treasure box! (af)

3. Iconic Tribute

There are many ways one can interpret a movie. The creative heads at DKNG Studios have designed a poster as a tribute to Bill Murray representing every movie in which Bill Murray has acted — from 1975 until today. The poster17 features icons that are designed with remarkable elements which synthesize the movie, accompanied by the year in which the movie was released.

Iconic Tribute18

You’ll be able to recognize “Ghostbusters“, “Charlie’s Angels“, “Coffee and Cigarettes” at one glance. But in case you don’t manage to guess all of them — don’t worry! You can check the titles at the bottom of the poster. Another memory game to question how well your own memory serves you! (tt)

Thank You For Reading!

We wish you a smashing weekend! By the way, you’ll probably notice that Smashing Magazine will soon get into the silent Christmas mode by the end of the year — but don’t worry! We are working on some outstanding articles that will be waiting for you in January. And don’t forget to check our Smashing Christmas Deals19. ;-)

Yours sincerely,
The Smashing Family

Footnotes

  1. 1 https://shop.smashingmagazine.com/christmas?pk_campaign=mailing-16-12&pk_kwd=mailing-16-12
  2. 2 https://shop.smashingmagazine.com/wp-bundle-deal.html?pk_campaign=mailing-16-12&pk_kwd=WP-bundle-link
  3. 3 #a1
  4. 4 #a2
  5. 5 #a3
  6. 6 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/pixel-rotation.png
  7. 7 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/square-selection.png
  8. 8 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/photoshop-actions-and-workflows.zip
  9. 9 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/illustrator-vector.png
  10. 10 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/nudging-menubar.jpg
  11. 11 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/nudging-menubar.jpg
  12. 12 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/nudging-windows.jpg
  13. 13 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/nudging-windows.jpg
  14. 14 http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2011/04/14/mastering-photoshop-pixel-perfection-when-rotating-pasting-and-nudging/
  15. 15 http://www.uiparade.com/
  16. 16 http://www.uiparade.com/
  17. 17 http://www.dkngstudios.com/2011/11/07/william-james-murray-art-print/
  18. 18 http://www.dkngstudios.com/2011/11/07/william-james-murray-art-print/
  19. 19 https://shop.smashingmagazine.com/christmas?pk_campaign=mailing-16-12&pk_kwd=lastlnk

The Smashing team loves high-quality content and cares about the little details. Through our online articles, Smashing Books, eBooks as well as Smashing Conferences, we are committed to stimulating creativity and strengthening the web design community’s creative forces.

Advertising
  1. 00

    No comments have been posted yet. Please feel free to comment first!
    Note: Make sure your comment is related to the topic of the article above. Let's start a personal and meaningful conversation!

Leave a Comment

Yay! You've decided to leave a comment. That's fantastic! Please keep in mind that comments are moderated and rel="nofollow" is in use. So, please do not use a spammy keyword or a domain as your name, or else it will be deleted. Let's have a personal and meaningful conversation instead. Thanks for dropping by!

↑ Back to top