Posts Tagged ‘HTML’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘HTML’.

Our Pointless Pursuit Of Semantic Value

Update (November 12th 2011): Read a reply by Jeremy Keith to this article in which he strongly argues about the importance of pursuing semantic value and addresses issues discussed in the article as well as in the comments here on Smashing Magazine.

Disclaimer: This article is published in the Opinion column section in which we provide active members of the community with the opportunity to share their thoughts and ideas publicly. Do you agree with the author? Please leave a comment. And if you disagree, would you like to write a rebuttal or counter piece? Leave a comment, too, and we will get back to you! Thank you.

Allow me to paint a picture. You are busy creating a website. You have a thought, “Oh, now I have to add an element.” Then another thought, “I feel so guilty adding a div. Div-itis is terrible, I hear.” Then, “I should use something else. The aside element might be appropriate.” Three searches and five articles later, you’re fairly confident that aside is not semantically correct. You decide on article, because at least it’s not a div. You’ve wasted 40 minutes, with no tangible benefit to show for it.

This is not the first time this topic has been broached. In 2004, Andy Budd wrote on semantic purity versus semantic realism. If your biggest problem with HTML5 is the distinction between an aside and a blockquote or the right way to mark up addresses, then you are not using HTML5 the way it was intended. Mark-up structures content, but your choice of tags matters a lot less than we’ve been taught for a while. Let’s go through some of the reasons why.

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Optimize Images With HTML5 Canvas

Images have always been the heaviest component of websites. Even if high-speed Internet access gets cheaper and more widely available, websites will get heavier more quickly. If you really care about your visitors, then spend some time deciding between good-quality images that are bigger in size and poorer-quality images that download more quickly. And keep in mind that modern Web browsers have enough power to enhance images right on the user’s computer. In this article, I’ll demonstrate one possible solution.

Let’s refer to an image that I came across recently in my job. As you can see, this image is of stage curtains and has some (intentional) light noise:

Optimizing an image like this would be a real pain because it contains a lot of red (which causes more artifacts in JPEG) and noise (which creates awful artifacts in JPEG and is bad for PNG packing). The best optimization I could get for this image was 330 KB JPEG, which is quite much for a single image. So, I decided to do some experiments with image enhancement right in the user’s browser.

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Behind The Scenes Of Nike Better World

Perhaps one of the most talked about websites in the last 12 months has been Nike Better World. It's been featured in countless Web design galleries, and it still stands as an example of what a great idea and some clever design and development techniques can produce.

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In this article, we’ll talk to the team behind Nike Better World to find out how the website was made. We'll look at exactly how it was put together, and then use similar techniques to create our own parallax scrolling website. Finally, we'll look at other websites that employ this technique to hopefully inspire you to build on these ideas and create your own variation.

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Useful HTML-, CSS- and JavaScript Tools and Libraries

Front-end development is a tricky beast. It's not difficult to learn, but it's quite difficult to master. There are just too many things that need to be considered; too many tweaks that might be necessary here and there; too many details to make everything just right. Luckily, developers and designers out there keep releasing useful tools and resources for all of us to learn, improve our skills and just get better at what we do.

Flexible Font Sizes with jQuery

Here at Smashing Magazine, we're continuously searching for time-saving, useful HTML-, CSS- and JavaScript-resources for our readers, to make the search of these ever-growing tools easier. We hope that these tools will help you improve your skills as well as your professional workflow. A sincere thanks to all designers and developers who are featured in this round-up. We respect and appreciate your contributions to the design community.

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Falling for HTML5: Finding Love in the Little Things

I've lost count of the number of posts that have been written about the big features of HTML5: amongst the most anticipated being rich media (video, audio, canvas) and JavaScript APIs. However, call me a woman of simple tastes, but this is not the sort of thing that gets me swooning. What does? The small additions to the spec that will make the world of difference to the way I code day-in, day-out. This is the stuff fairy tales are made of.

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HTML has had a troubled past. It was never really designed for what we are now accomplishing with it. This is in part a testimony to its flexibility and adaptability, but there have been inevitable growing pains.

So what was it originally intended for? Well it’s there in the name: Hyper-Text Markup Language. Yes, text; hyper-text to be more exact. Not layout, or images, or video, or fonts, or menus — or any of the other frippery that it now incorporates.

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Why We Should Start Using CSS3 and HTML5 Today

For a while now, here on Smashing Magazine, we have taken notice of how many designers are reluctant to embrace the new technologies such as CSS3 or HTML5 because of the lack of full cross-browser support for these technologies. Many designers are complaining about the numerous ways how the lack of cross-browser compatibility is effectively holding us back and tying our hands — keeping us from completely being able to shine and show off the full scope of our abilities in our work. Many are holding on to the notion that once this push is made, we will wake to a whole new Web — full of exciting opportunities just waiting on the other side. So they wait for this day. When in reality, they are effectively waiting for Godot.

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Just like the elusive character from Beckett’s classic play, this day of complete cross-browser support is not ever truly going to find its dawn and deliver us this wonderful new Web where our work looks the same within the window of any and every Web browser. Which means that many of us in the online reaches, from clients to designers to developers and on, are going to need to adjust our thinking so that we can realistically approach the Web as it is now, and more than likely how it will be in the future.

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Learning to Love HTML5

It seems that new resources and articles for teaching and promoting HTML5 are popping up almost daily. We've been given HTML5 templates in the form of the HTML5 boilerplate and HTML5 Reset (although they both go beyond just HTML5 stuff). We've got a plethora of books to choose from that cover HTML5 and its related technologies. We've got shivs, galleries, and a physician to help heal your HTML5 maladies. And don't forget the official spec.

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From my own vantage point — aside from a few disputes about what the term "HTML5" should and shouldn't mean — the web design and development community has for the most part embraced all the new technologies and semantics with a positive attitude.

While it's certainly true that HTML5 has the potential to change the web for the better, the reality is that these kinds of major changes can be difficult to grasp and embrace. I'm personally in the process of gaining a better understanding of the subtleties of HTML5's various new features, so I thought I would discuss some things associated with HTML5 that appear to be somewhat confusing.

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