Posts Tagged ‘Accessibility’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Accessibility’.

The WAI Forward

It's one thing to create a web application and quite another to keep it accessible — independent of the device that the user is using and its capabilities. That's why Heydon Pickering, now the accessibility editor on Smashing Magazine, wrote an eBook Apps For All: Coding Accessible Web Applications, outlining the roadmap for well-designed, accessible applications.

This article is an excerpt of a chapter in the eBook that introduces many of the ideas and techniques presented. Reviewed by Steve Faulkner, it's an eBook you definitely shouldn't miss if you're a developer who cares about well-structured content and inclusive interface design. – Ed.

The WAI Forward

Because the W3C’s mission from the outset has been to make the web accessible, accessibility features are built into its specifications. As responsible designers, we have the job of creating compelling web experiences without disrupting the inclusive features of a simpler design.

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Mobile And Accessibility: Why You Should Care And What You Can Do About It

Mobile has revolutionized the way we use the web. This is especially true of disabled users, for whom mobile devices open the door to a whole new spectrum of interactions.

Mobile And Accessibility: Why You Should Care And What You Can Do About It

And they are taking advantage of it. A July 2013 survey (PDF) of adults with disabilities done by the Wireless Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center found that 91% of people with disabilities use a “wireless device such as a cell phone or tablet.” Among these users, screen reader usage is common, even on mobile devices.

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10 Ways To Make Your XHTML Site Accessible Using Web Standards

Without argument, one of the most important things to consider when creating a website is that it be accessible to everyone who wants to view it. Does your website play nice with screen readers? Can a user override your style sheet with a more accessible one and still see everything your website has to offer? Would another Web developer be embarrassed if they saw your code? If your website is standards-compliant, you could more confidently answer these questions.

Accessibility

Let’s take a look at 10 ways to improve the accessibility of your XHTML website by making it standards-compliant. We'll go the extra mile and include criteria that fall beyond the standards set by the W3C but which you should follow to make your website more accessible. Each section lists the criteria you need to meet, explains why you need to meet them and gives examples of what you should and shouldn’t do.

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