Posts Tagged ‘Android’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Android’.

Making Time: Redesigning A Calendar Experience For Android

In UX design, few things are more intricate than time and personal time management — only a good arsenal of mobile design patterns and information architecture principles can save you. This is the story of redesigning the UX for a popular calenda tool on Android: Business Calendar. We’ll cover designing systems, interaction design problems, scaling across screens and platforms, research, and big business decisions and their outcomes.

Making Time: Redesigning A Calendar Experience For Android

Business Calendar started out as a side project, a one-man show, and is now run by a team of eight in Berlin. The app was very successful right from the time Android entered the mainstream market, and it now has an active user base of 2 million. But instead of modernizing the design and usability regularly, the developers focused on implementing user requests and customization options.

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Sideblog Material Design Icons, Goodies and Starter Kits

It's always great to have a little toolbox with just the right tools waiting for you when you need them. What if you are about to start working on a new project which should apply the material design language introduced by Google last year? What if you had just a good starter kit with everything you need to dive into the creative process without being distracted by routine tasks?

Material Design Principles

We're here to have your back — with a little selection of handy goodies, icons, templates and tools to help you get off the ground faster. This post is one of our first shorter "Sideblog" pieces where we highlight some of the more useful and helpful snippets and goodies every now and then. We'd love to hear your feedback in the comments to this post.

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The Basics Of Test Automation For Apps, Games And The Mobile Web

Mobile application ecosystems — let’s count Android and iOS here — are unbelievably dynamic, but they also suffer from both software and hardware fragmentation. This is especially true for Android, but fragmentation also exists in the iOS ecosystem, as experienced with the rollout of iOS 8. As the latest version of iOS was released, many existing apps were made clumsy on updated devices.

The Basics Of Test Automation For Apps, Games And The Mobile Web

Even the new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus have had not-so-typical issues for Apple devices. In addition, a significant proportion of users with older devices have very few options: essentially, buy new hardware (i.e. a new device) to get everything working well.

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Mobile Design Pattern: Inventory-Based Discrete Slider

Sliders are cool. When they’re done well, customers love to interact with them. When they're not done well, they can cause a lot of frustration (not to mention lost sales) by standing between your customers and what they want. And getting them wrong is surprisingly easy.

Mobile Design Pattern: Inventory-Based Discrete Slider

In this article, we will present a solution, including the design and code, for a new type of Android slider to address common problems, along with a downloadable Android mini-app for you to try out. It’s a deep dive into sliders based on a chapter in Android Design Patterns. The experimental inventory-based slider we will look at would be at home in any application that asks for a price, a size, or any other faceted input within a widely distributed range.

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What Every App Developer Should Know About Android

In today’s fast-paced mobile market, consumers have no patience for mobile apps that compromise their experience. “Crashes” and “Not working” are the most common feedback on Google Play for unstable or sluggish apps (including games). Those comments and ratings make hundreds of millions of potential downloaders skip those lousy apps. Sounds harsh, but that’s the way it is.

What Every App Developer Should Know About Android

An app succeeds not by chance. It is the result of the right decisions made at the right time. The most successful mobile app developers understand the importance of performance, quality and robustness across the array of mobile devices that their customers use.

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Rebuilding An HTML5 Game In Unity

When our HTML5 game Numolition was nearly done, we decided to throw it all away and rebuild it in Unity. That turned out to be an exciting and valuable experience, and one that I thought would be worth sharing with other Web developers. Come in, the water’s warm!

Why We Rebuilt Our HTML5 Game In Unity

Last year, we released a mobile game named Quento. It was written entirely in HTML5, wrapped in our proprietary PhoneGap alternative and launched in many app stores with mild success. The game caused me to jot down a few spinoff ideas. One that I particularly liked was a game with a stack of numbered tiles in which the player has to clear a level by combining numbers and tapping groups to make them disappear.

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Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 4: Appcelerator Titanium

This article is the last in a series of articles covering four ways to develop a mobile application. In previous articles, we covered how to build a tip calculator in native iOS, native Android and PhoneGap. In this article, we’ll look at another cross-platform development tool, Appcelerator Titanium.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 4: Appcelerator Titanium

PhoneGap enabled us to build a tip calculator app quickly and have it run on both the Android and iOS platforms. In doing so, we were left with a user interface (UI) that, while quite usable, did not offer quite the same experience as that of a truly native application. Our PhoneGap solution leveraged a Web view and rendered the UI with HTML5 and CSS3.

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Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 3: PhoneGap

This is the third installment in a series covering four ways to develop a mobile application. In previous articles, we examined how to build a native iOS and native Android tip calculator. In this article, we’ll create a multi-platform solution using PhoneGap.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 3: PhoneGap

Adobe’s PhoneGap platform enables a developer to create an app that runs on a variety of mobile devices. The developer accomplishes this largely by writing the user interface portion of their application with Web technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

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Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 2: Native Android

This article is the second in a series of four articles covering four ways to develop mobile applications. The last article covered how to accomplish this using native iOS development tools. In this article, we’ll look at how to build the same sort of application using native Android tools.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 2: Native Android

We’ve been building a simple tip calculator. As with the iOS application, this one contains two screens: a main view and a settings view. The settings view persists the default tip percentage to local storage using Android’s SDK support.

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Brave New World Designing For A Maturing Android

Android is huge: 480 million people currently use Android devices, and 1 million new devices are activated daily. This means that every three weeks, the number of people who activate new Android devices is equal to the entire population of Australia. (Recent studies by Nielsen show that more Android devices are on the market than iOS devices.)

Designing For A Maturing Android

Popular apps that become available on Android experience huge growth. For example, Instagram grew by 10 million users with the launch of its Android app — in just 10 days.

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