Posts Tagged ‘Android’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Android’.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 4: Appcelerator Titanium

This article is the last in a series of articles covering four ways to develop a mobile application. In previous articles, we covered how to build a tip calculator in native iOS, native Android and PhoneGap. In this article, we’ll look at another cross-platform development tool, Appcelerator Titanium.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 4: Appcelerator Titanium

PhoneGap enabled us to build a tip calculator app quickly and have it run on both the Android and iOS platforms. In doing so, we were left with a user interface (UI) that, while quite usable, did not offer quite the same experience as that of a truly native application. Our PhoneGap solution leveraged a Web view and rendered the UI with HTML5 and CSS3.

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Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 3: PhoneGap

This is the third installment in a series covering four ways to develop a mobile application. In previous articles, we examined how to build a native iOS and native Android tip calculator. In this article, we’ll create a multi-platform solution using PhoneGap.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 3: PhoneGap

Adobe’s PhoneGap platform enables a developer to create an app that runs on a variety of mobile devices. The developer accomplishes this largely by writing the user interface portion of their application with Web technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript.

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Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 2: Native Android

This article is the second in a series of four articles covering four ways to develop mobile applications. The last article covered how to accomplish this using native iOS development tools. In this article, we’ll look at how to build the same sort of application using native Android tools.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 2: Native Android

We’ve been building a simple tip calculator. As with the iOS application, this one contains two screens: a main view and a settings view. The settings view persists the default tip percentage to local storage using Android’s SDK support.

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Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 1: Native iOS

The mobile application development landscape is filled with many ways to build a mobile app. Among the most popular are: native iOS, native Android, PhoneGap and Appcelerator Titanium.

Four Ways To Build A Mobile Application, Part 4: Appcelerator Titanium

This article marks the start of a series of four articles covering the technologies above. The series will provide an overview of how to build a simple mobile application using each of these four approaches. Because few developers have had the opportunity to develop for mobile using a variety of tools, this series is intended to broaden your scope.

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Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code

Much has been written recently in the ongoing debate between native and HTML5 applications. There are three principal ways to develop a mobile solution: native code, hybrid mobile app, mobile Web app. Developing an application in HTML5 is a way to leverage code across multiple platforms, rather than having to write the entire application from scratch for each platform.

Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code

As such, much of the user interface, perhaps the entire interface, would be done in HTML. “Hybrid application” is a term often given to applications that are developed largely in HTML5 for the user interface and that rely on native code to access device-specific features that are not readily available to Web applications.

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Brave New WorldDesigning For A Maturing Android

Android is huge: 480 million people currently use Android devices, and 1 million new devices are activated daily. This means that every three weeks, the number of people who activate new Android devices is equal to the entire population of Australia. (Recent studies by Nielsen show that more Android devices are on the market than iOS devices.)

Designing For A Maturing Android

Popular apps that become available on Android experience huge growth. For example, Instagram grew by 10 million users with the launch of its Android app — in just 10 days.

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Design PatternsC-Swipe: An Ergonomic Solution To Navigation Fragmentation On Android

There are 3,997 different Android devices. Your navigation should work with all of them. C-Swipe can help: It is an alternative navigation pattern for tablets and mobile devices that is novel, ergonomic and localized.

Navigation Fragmentation On Android

This article provides a detailed walk-through of the design and code and provides a downloadable mini-app so that you can try out C-Swipe to see whether it’s right for your app.

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