Posts Tagged ‘API’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘API’.

React To The Future With Isomorphic Apps

Things often come full circle in software engineering. The web in particular started with servers delivering content down to the client. Recently, with the creation of modern web frameworks such as AngularJS and Ember, we’ve seen a push to render on the client and only use a server for an API. We’re now seeing a possible return or, rather, more of a combination of both architectures happening.

React To The Future With Isomorphic Apps

React has quickly risen to immense popularity in the JavaScript community. There are a number of reasons for its success. One is that Facebook created it and uses it. This means that many developers at Facebook work with it, fixing bugs, suggesting features and so on.

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Accessibility APIs: A Key To Web Accessibility

Web accessibility is about people. Successful web accessibility is about anticipating the different needs of all sorts of people, understanding your fellow web users and the different ways they consume information, empathizing with them and their sense of what is convenient and what frustratingly unnecessary barriers you could help them to avoid.

Accessibility APIs: A Key To Web Accessibility

Armed with this understanding, accessibility becomes a cold, hard technical challenge. A firm grasp of the technology is paramount to making informed decisions about accessible design. How do assistive technologies present a web application to make it accessible for their users? Where do they get the information they need? One of the keys is a technology known as the accessibility API (or accessibility application programming interface, to use its full formal title).

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Creating Well-Behaved Sites With The Page Visibility API

We’re all resigned to it: launching a browser reloads every tab you previously had open, blasting a cacophonous mix of sound and video. While browsers have made it easier to control this experience with tab icons and extensions like MuteTab, for most people this behavior presents a confusing and disorienting experience. As developers and designers it’s our job to make the web welcoming, not overwhelming.

Creating Well-Behaved Sites With The Page Visibility API

Doesn’t it make sense that sites should only be active when they are the primary focused tab? Why are we burning up batteries and processor cycles with animation that can’t be seen?

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Why AJAX Isn’t Enough

AJAX calls have moved user interaction on the Web a huge step forward: We no longer need to reload the page in response to each user input. Using AJAX, we can call specific procedures on the server and update the page based on the returned values, giving our applications fast interactivity.

Why Ajax Isn't Enough

What AJAX calls do not cover are updates from the server, which are needed for the modern real-time and collaborative web. This need for updates covers use cases ranging from a couple of users collaboratively editing a document to the notification of potentially millions of readers of a news website that a goal has been scored in a World Cup match. Another messaging pattern, in addition to the response request of AJAX, is needed — one that works at any scale. PubSub (as in “publish and subscribe”) is an established messaging pattern that achieves this.

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Enhancing User Experience With The Web Speech API

It’s an exciting time for web APIs, and one to watch out for is the Web Speech API. It enables websites and web apps not only to speak to you, but to listen, too. It’s still early days, but this functionality is set to open a whole array of use cases. I’d say that’s pretty awesome.

Enhancing User Experience With The Web Speech API

In this article, we’ll look at the technology and its proposed usage, as well as some great examples of how it can be used to enhance the user experience.

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The State Of Animation 2014

The post-Flash era is hardly free of animation. CSS animation is quickly becoming a cornerstone of user-friendly interfaces on mobile and desktop, and JavaScript libraries already exist to handle complex interactive animations. In the wake of so much “CSS versus JavaScript animation” infighting, a new API specifically for web animation is coming out that might just unite both camps.

The State Of Animation 2014

It’s an exciting time for web animation, and also a time of grave miscommunication and misinformation. In 2014, I had the chance to travel the world to talk about using animation in user interfaces and design. I met and interviewed dozens of people who use and champion both CSS and JavaScript. After interviewing so many developers, designers and browser representatives, I discovered a technical and human story to be told.

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Declarative Programming And The Web

Like most web developers, I spend my days giving instructions to computers. These instructions generally involve some input (a request for a web page), some logic (get the right content from a database) and some output (send the content to the requesting browser). This process of telling a computer how to perform a task, such as generating a web page, is what we commonly call “programming,” but it’s only a subset of programming: imperative programming.

Declarative Programming And The Web

There’s another type of programming, declarative programming, that most web developers also use every day but don’t often recognize as programming. With declarative programming, we tell a computer what, not how. We describe the result we want, and the details of how to accomplish it are left to the language interpreter. This subtle shift in approach to programming has broad effects on how we build software, especially how we build the future web.

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Laying The Groundwork For Extensibility

The Web has succeeded at interoperability and scale in a way that no other technology has before or since. Still, the Web remains far from “state of the art”, and it is being increasingly threatened by walled gardens. The Web platform often lags competitors in delivering new system and device capabilities to developers.

Laying The Groundwork For Extensibility

Worse, it often hobbles new capabilities behind either high- or low-level APIs, forcing painful choices (and workarounds) on developers. Despite browser versions being released much faster, new capabilities still take a long time to materialize, and often do so in forms that are at best frustrating and at worst nearly useless to large swathes of the developer community for solving real-world needs.

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