Posts Tagged ‘Browsers’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Browsers’.

Inside Microsoft’s New Rendering Engine For The “Project Spartan”

Last week, Microsoft made its biggest announcement for the web since it first introduced Internet Explorer in 1995: a new browser, codenamed “Project Spartan.” So, what does this mean for us as designers and developers? What rendering engine will Spartan be using, and how will it affect our work? We spoke with Jacob Rossi, the senior engineer at Microsoft's web platform team, about the new browser, the rendering engine behind it, and whether it's going to replace Internet Explorer in the long run. This article, written by Jacob, is the result of our conversations, with a few insights that you may find quite useful. – Ed.

Project Spartan

Spartan is a project that has been in the making for some time now and over the next few months we’ll continue to learn more about the new browser, what it has to offer users, and what its platform will look like. It will be a matter of few months until users and developers alike will be able to try Spartan for themselves, but we can share some of the interesting bits already today. This article will cover the inside story of the rendering engine powering Spartan, how it came to be, and how 20 years of the Internet Explorer platform (Trident) has helped inform how our team designed it.

Read more...

Adapting To The InkTips And Tricks For Print Style Sheets

Print continues to be treated somewhat cursorily by most Web designers, who tend to be obsessed with pixels rather than printers. In the real world, a significant portion of people rely on pages printed from websites for reference: there’s still something about having a physical sheet of paper in one’s hands, even in this age of digital saturation.

Tips And Tricks For Print Style Sheets

Web developers can take several steps to bridge the gap between the worlds of printers and LCD screens. First, let’s cover the basics. Modern print style sheets are typically placed within a media query.

Read more...

From The Server To The ClientClient-Side Templating

Using templates in the browser is becoming more and more widespread. Moving application logic from the server to the client, and the increasing usage of MVC-like patterns (model–view–controller) inspired templates to embrace the browser.

Client-Side Templating

This used to be a server-side only affair, but templates are actually very powerful and expressive in client-side development as well. In general, leveraging templates is a great way to separate markup and logic in views, and to maximize code reusability and maintainability. With a syntax close to the desired output (i.e. HTML), you have a clear and fast way to get things done.

Read more...

It’s Time To Stop Blaming Internet Explorer

Earlier this week we published two articles by Louis Lazaris: one on why old browsers are holding back the Web and another encouraging Web users to upgrade their browsers and use modern browsers other than IE. This article presents another perspective on this issue. Nicholas C. Zakas, a well-respected member of the developer community, goes into specifics of why we should focus on the good parts of our job so we can tolerate the bad ones and why fixating on circumstances that you can’t change isn’t a recipe for success. Do you share Louis' or Nicholas' view? Leave a comment.—Ed.

A couple of days ago, Smashing Magazine published an article entitled, Old Browsers Are Holding Back The Web. The author of this article, Louis Lazaris, suggests that “old browsers” are holding Web developers back from creating beautiful experiences. Old browsers, in this case, apparently referred to Internet Explorer version 6-9. That’s right, the author groups Internet Explorer 9 into the same group as Internet Explorer 6. He goes on to list some of the things that you can’t use in Internet Explorer 8 and 9.

Read more...

Dear Web User: Please Upgrade Your Browser

Shopping. Social networking. Emailing. Reading. Finding directions. Banking. Researching. Those are some of the most common tasks people perform on the World Wide Web. You've probably done all of these things yourself at some point. So if you're like many people, you probably do these things every single week (and many of them even every day).

Dear Web User: Please Upgrade Your Browser

This blog you're reading now, Smashing Magazine, normally publishes content that's intended for graphic designers, Web designers, and Web developers of varying skill levels. But today, this article is for the rest of you—the non-programmers, the everyday Web users.

Read more...

Old Browsers Are Holding Back The Web

Because of how far certain Web technologies like HTML5 and CSS3 have brought us, many would say that—from a Web platform perspective—the future is now. Sounds like a cliché, I know. At the very least, it feels like the future is starting to bubble up to the surface... but it's just not quite there yet.

Old Browsers Are Holding Back The Web

When we use new DOM features, HTML5 APIs and the latest in CSS3, the possibilities that open up are astounding. These new technologies help us easily build Web applications with less reliance on hacks, plugins, images, and bloated scripts. This makes life easier not only for Web developers (for both building and maintaining these projects) but also for the end user who gets a faster and stronger overall experience.

Read more...

JavaScript Profiling With The Chrome Developer Tools

Your website works. Now let’s make it work faster. Website performance is about two things: how fast the page loads, and how fast the code on it runs. Plenty of services will make your website load faster, from minimizers to CDNs, but making it run faster is up to you.

JavaScript Profiling With The Chrome Developer Tools

Little changes in your code can have gigantic performance impacts. A few lines here or there could mean the difference between a blazingly fast website and the dreaded “Unresponsive Script” dialog. This article shows you a few ways to find those lines of code with Chrome Developer Tools.

Read more...

↑ Back to top