Posts Tagged ‘Business’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Business’.

How To Successfully Educate Your Clients On Web Development

If you are running a design agency, your job is very likely to combine business development, graphic design, technology and user experience design: a basketful of very different fields. When dealing with clients, one faces the challenge of clearly and effectively communicating the goals and results of the work done in these areas. In this post, we'll provide you with some ideas on sharing information and knowledge with developers and clients — a couple of tips and tricks we've learned from our own experience.

Education of clients

As designers, our core purpose is to solve business challenges for our clients. No, I haven’t forgotten you Mac-loving, single-mouse-button-fanatic designers. A business solution includes an application platform, solid data design and a page design that makes the UI and website approachable and easy to use (for converting, transacting, clicking on a monkey's butt, etc.). Your daily challenge, then, is to deliver the project on time while satisfying the client's visual, business and aesthetic requirements.

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Choosing Your First Full Time Position Wisely

Being a web developer or designer is a great job. Working full-time doing the things you love and having the ability to work freelance on the side is a plus. But being a college student looking for placement, or fresh out of school and looking for your first full time job can be stressful. Not knowing exactly what to look for can cause some problems, and potentially even hamper your future in some cases working for others. So what do you look for when you are searching for a placement or your first full-time job?

Having went through this in the past, I had no guidance of what to look for. Applying for several jobs over the internet job boards, I found a small company hiring developers with little to no experience, and offering the job through a local internship program. I thought this was a great opportunity so I took it. In the beginning, it was great. I learned quite a few things while working at this small company.

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The Designer Who Delivers

Whether you design and code websites all by yourself or run a small business with a pool of talent, you will always face the challenge of how much to work on a design and UI before passing the mock-ups on to the developer? Moreover, how much visual work needs to be done in order to effectively present a website to a client? In this article, we’ll talk about best practices for clear communication, which tools to use and how to manage resources on both small and large projects.

The Designer Who Delivers

As the owner of a small business, I have watched our company grow from a part-time, basement-dwelling, under-the-radar operation to a small business with an office, chairs, desks, and staplers (aren’t staplers an indication of legitimacy?). During this process of breaking out of our egg shell, we have birthed a company culture and a set of best practices, and we have gained valuable experience in the field of Web design and development. One of these nuggets of experience is acquiring the ability to save time and money by creating just the right amount of visual material to communicate clearly with both the client and website developer.

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Meeting Your Client for the First Time

When I first started out as a freelancer and got my first client – the prospect of meeting him was daunting to say the least. Over time, my confidence grew which led me to write a short overview of points related to that first crucial introduction here.

However, meeting a client as I have learned is much more than just remembering to bring a pen and a spare laptop battery! There are many dos, and don'ts as well as pitfalls to avoid.

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Dealing With Clients Who Refuse To Pay

As a designer, you will eventually have to face a couple of unfortunate truths in your career. Number one: just because you wear a bathrobe for most of your "business" hours does not actually make it business attire. Number two: at some point in your freelance career, you will encounter a client who does not respect the work you do. The most unfortunate part of this unfortunate truth is that it will all too often present itself in the form of a client who refuses to pay for your services once all of the work has been completed.

Financial in Freelance Contracts: Dos And Donts

However, you can put some safeguards in place to guarantee that if this kind of client disrespects you and a dispute arises, that you are not left without any leverage to help you resolve the situation. Because whether they admit it, some loathsome characters deal with freelancers merely because they believe these smaller independent businesses would have little recourse should they not hold up their end of the bargain. They think that once we have taken the time to complete the work and deliver it, that they have all the power to control the outcome of the business transaction. But now more than ever, this is not the case.

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The Basics of Business Card Design

A business card in some cases is the most important marketing piece that a company will have. It has the potential to make or break business deals, and is just as important as the way you present yourself during a first impression. In this post, we will cover some of the basics such as typography, layout, object placement and printing standards when designing a business card.

Before you move too far into a fresh design, printing standards should always be considered. Most printing companies now require files to have appropriate bleeds and margins or your might get an email to upload new files and in some cases, incur extra fees. To correctly set up your design, you need to download or create a template. There are two ways to establish what type of template you are going to use, and that is whether you are going to have image bleed or not. Bleed is the area in which an image runs off the edge of your design. If your image doesn't bleed then your job just got a little easier. Use a 3.5×2 document. If you are using bleeds, then make sure your template is set up with a 1/8" margin outside the printable area. You can download a sample template here.

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What I Wish Someone Had Told Me About Freelancing

I've been freelancing as a brand identity artist for about a year now and there are some things I have learned along the way. I researched a lot of articles about freelancing but all of them tended to say the same things, like don't quit your day job until you have a solid plan in place, be prepared to market yourself, get to know your tax laws, etc etc etc. While this is all great advice, there are still some things that I feel people should have told me.

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