Posts Tagged ‘Communication’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Communication’.

Guidelines For Working With External Code Libraries

Working with code that was created by some other person or organization is routine for developers, but it can be one of the most demanding activities, particularly if you’re still learning. From using code libraries to working on a team of developers, there are bound to be times when you need to get to grips with code written by someone other than yourself.

Firebug

Whether you’re a software developer or a Web designer who does a bit of coding from time to time, your work routine might sometimes be isolated, but your work typically is not. When you use an external resource or work on an existing system, you see that your work exists in the context of other technologies and, yes, other people.

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Two Cats In A Sack: Designer-Developer Discord

The differences between designers and developers often erupt in pointed jabs on the Web or at conferences. Jokes or not, the jabs create friction whose consequences are real. I am a designer, and by no elaborate means of job-title-rejigging do I consider myself a developer, but I see the cruelty of designer and developer egos going both ways. So, what happens if someone throws a pair into a sack to hash it out? How do we emerge?

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Our projects, careers and maturing industry rely on our ability to learn to work together instead of against each other, and looking at what we have in common is one way to begin addressing interdisciplinary cat fights.

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Dear Web Design Community, Where Have You Gone?

As Web craftsmen, we are living in exciting times today. The frenetic pace of evolution in our industry has created remarkable opportunities for our work. Our established set of design and coding practices is more comprehensive than it has ever been before. Our designs are becoming more usable, our code more scalable, our layouts more responsive. In fact, just by comparing our design processes to those from a decade ago, it's remarkable to observe how quickly we've developed and honed our craft over all these years.

HTML5 Boilerplate is a remarkable example of a cooperation of dozens of Web designers who share their thoughts to create something useful for all of us to use.

However, the maturity of our industry is far from being complete. While producing a myriad of technological advancements, we have outpaced other developments along the way. These developments aren't related to the lack of cross-browser standards support or technical downsides of the tools we are using. No, they have a different nature. They have emerged within our design community — a community which is now so fertile and diverse that it is becoming increasingly difficult to ensure its professional maturity.

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Guidelines for Successful Communication With Clients

OK, so this is a yet another article about dealing with clients. But let’s face it — it doesn’t matter how well you can design or code; as a freelancer or if you're running a digital agency, if you don’t get the client management right, it can spell disaster for your business. By getting it right from the very beginning, you’ll most likely see things flourish.

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In a previous article on How to Explain to Clients they are Wrong, I discussed one aspect of client management, but oh my, there are so many and that is why I would like to discuss yet another aspect in this article: how to maintain project productivity and momentum when working with clients.

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How To Convince The Client That Your Design Is Perfect

As designers who deal with clients, we all have to face one situation, no matter how difficult and uncomfortable, and that is guiding the client to accept that your design is perfect. Now, you already have the project, so this is not a matter of convincing them to pick you for the job. This is about getting them to see that your design satisfies their requirements and contains everything they want. We all have to take on this role of virtual tour guide and lead them through the project's twists and turns, ensuring that the best interests of the client and website are served.

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In the end, the final decision falls to the client, but there are times — and most of us have experienced them — when the client’s lack of expertise in the field affect the quality of the design. In such times, we have a responsibility to do everything in our power to convince the client that the design is perfect as it is, and that any further alteration would impair the website's ability to communicate everything it needs to. This confrontation is not welcome by either party, but it is certainly necessary.

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How To Successfully Educate Your Clients On Web Development

If you are running a design agency, your job is very likely to combine business development, graphic design, technology and user experience design: a basketful of very different fields. When dealing with clients, one faces the challenge of clearly and effectively communicating the goals and results of the work done in these areas. In this post, we'll provide you with some ideas on sharing information and knowledge with developers and clients — a couple of tips and tricks we've learned from our own experience.

Education of clients

As designers, our core purpose is to solve business challenges for our clients. No, I haven’t forgotten you Mac-loving, single-mouse-button-fanatic designers. A business solution includes an application platform, solid data design and a page design that makes the UI and website approachable and easy to use (for converting, transacting, clicking on a monkey's butt, etc.). Your daily challenge, then, is to deliver the project on time while satisfying the client's visual, business and aesthetic requirements.

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How To Explain To Clients That They Are Wrong

GIFs of spinning @s on the "Contact us" page. Common usability mistakes for the sake of visual appeal. Splash pages. Fancy search box. No whitespace. Music on page load. Home page banner of a jigsaw-puzzle globe with a piece missing. Sometimes you just know that what a client is requesting is wrong and that you have to find a way to tell them. But how?

A close image of the Hulk character with an angry face

Before getting into how to explain to a client that they're wrong, ask yourself, "Is the client actually wrong to begin with?" Just because you don't approve of the direction they're taking or of a request they've made doesn't necessarily mean it is not a step in the right direction for the project. To be able to answer this question effectively, you need to train yourself to be completely objective and humble when dealing with client requests.

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