Posts Tagged ‘CSS’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS’.

!important CSS Declarations: How and When to Use Them

When the CSS1 specification was drafted in the mid to late 90s, it introduced !important declarations that would help developers and users easily override normal specificity when making changes to their stylesheets. For the most part, !important declarations have remained the same, with only one change in CSS2.1 and nothing new added or altered in the CSS3 spec in connection with this unique declaration.

Adding !important in Developer Tools

[fblike]

Let's take a look at what exactly these kinds of declarations are all about, and when, if ever, you should use them. But before we get into !important declarations and how exactly they work, let's give this discussion a bit of context. In the past, Smashing Magazine has covered CSS specificity in-depth, so please take a look at that article if you want a detailed discussion on the CSS cascade and how specificity ties in.

Read more...

Transparent CSS Sprites

One of the most useful front-end development techniques of recent years is the humble “CSS Sprites”. The technique was popularised by Dave Shea on A List Apart in 2004 with his article CSS Sprites: Image Slicing’s Kiss of Death. CSS Sprites are a relatively simple technique once you understand the fundamentals and it can be applied in all manner of ways. A common use is for a graphic intensive navigation, but it can also be useful for buttons or even styling headings with the corporate font.

Screenshot

[fblike]

Sprites are simply a collection of images which are merged together to create a single file. You then use CSS, changing the background-position the image, to display the correct part of the image you need. I often use the analogy of a large object passing a window — you only see what is within the frame.

Over the last couple of years CSS Sprites has been one of the most widely adopted CSS-related techniques. Popularised by the Yahoo’s research and documentation around speeding up your website, many high profile websites implement the technique, including Google and Amazon. There are numerous tutorials which help you get to grips with the techniques and sprite generators which help you create the graphics themselves.

Read more...

50 New Useful CSS Techniques, Tutorials and Tools

These are great times for front-end developers. After months of exaggerated excitement about HTML5 and CSS3, the web design community now starts coming up with CSS techniques that actually put newly available technologies to practical use instead of abusing them for pure aesthetic purposes. We see fewer "pure CSS images" and more advanced, clever CSS techniques that can actually improve the Web browsing experience of users. And that's a good thing!

Screenshot

[fblike]

In this post we present recently released CSS techniques, tutorials and tools for you to use and enhance your workflow, thus improving your skills. Please don't hesitate to comment on this post and let us know how exactly you are using them in your workflow. However, please avoid link dropping, but share your insights and your experience instead. Also, notice that some techniques are not only CSS-based, but use JavaScript, or JavaScript-libraries as well.

Our job is to promote good, high-quality content and resources. If you wrote or developed something useful, contact us — we will do our best to spread the word and help you out.

Read more...

Five Useful CSS/jQuery Coding Techniques For More Dynamic Websites

Interactivity can transform a dull static website into a dynamic tool that not only delights users but conveys information more effectively. In this post, we'll walk through five different coding techniques that can be easily implemented on any website to provide a richer user experience. These techniques will allow you to better display difficult content, help users find information more effectively and provide meaningful UI cues without overwhelming the user: on-page text search, drag controls for oversized content, subtle hover effects, comment count bars and a full-page slider.

Drag controls for oversized content

[fblike]

Websites often have search boxes to allow users to find content from their archives. But what if you want to find content on the given page? Information Architects has had on-page text search that provides a great user experience. Let's recreate this using jQuery.

Read more...

How To Use CSS3 Media Queries To Create a Mobile Version of Your Website

CSS3 continues to both excite and frustrate web designers and developers. We are excited about the possibilities that CSS3 brings, and the problems it will solve, but also frustrated by the lack of support in Internet Explorer 8. This article will demonstrate a technique that uses part of CSS3 that is also unsupported by Internet Explorer 8. However, it doesn't matter as one of the most useful places for this module is somewhere that does have a lot of support - small devices such as the iPhone, and Android devices.

dConstruct 2010 website on a desktop browser

In this article I'll explain how, with a few CSS rules, you can create an iPhone version of your site using CSS3, that will work now. We'll have a look at a very simple example and I'll also discuss the process of adding a small screen device stylesheet to my own site to show how easily we can add stylesheets for mobile devices to existing websites.

Read more...

Start Using CSS3 Today: Techniques and Tutorials

We have been publishing articles about CSS3 for a while now, and we keep receiving angry e-mails from some developers who complain that it doesn't make sense to use CSS3 today. Yes, Internet Explorer doesn't support most CSS3 properties. And yes, CSS3 vendor prefixes are bad for maintainability (and this is why we recommend extracting vendor prefixes in a separate CSS3 file).

But it's OK to accept that Web is a dynamic medium, and it's OK to create rich, interactive, beautiful designs for those who are already using a modern browser or will be using one soon. It just doesn't make sense to keep looking back, being afraid of looking forward and therefore avoid experimenting and learning about new CSS3 properties today. And this is why we keep publishing articles about CSS3.

CSS3 Leopard-style Stacks

In this post we present an extensive round-up of CSS3 techniques, tools and resources that will help you learn how to use CSS3 in your designs right away. We have grouped most useful articles by the corresponding properties, described what browsers support what properties, presented alternative JavaScript-based approaches and workarounds for Internet Explorer and added a couple of links to useful CSS3 generators and tools in the end of the post.

You may be interested in the following related articles:

Read more...

50 New Useful CSS Techniques, Tools and Tutorials

Over the last years we've got a pretty good understanding of what CSS does, how it works and how we can use it for our layouts, typography and visual presentation of the content. However, there are still some attributes that are not so well-known; also, CSS3 offers us new possibilities and tools that need to be understood, learned and then applied in the right context to the right effect.

CSS font stacks

In this round-up we present fresh useful articles about less-known CSS 2.1 and CSS3 properties as well as an overview of recently published CSS techniques, tools and tips for designers and web-developers. Please stay tuned: next week we will present the second part of this article, featuring fresh CSS3 techniques, tools and resources.

Read more...

The Principles Of Cross-Browser CSS Coding

It is arguable that there is no goal in web design more satisfying than getting a beautiful and intuitive design to look exactly the same in every currently-used browser. Unfortunately, that goal is generally agreed to be almost impossible to attain. Some have even gone on record as stating that perfect, cross-browser compatibility is not necessary.

Cross-Browser CSS

While I agree that creating a consistent experience for every user in every browser (putting aside mobile platforms for the moment) is never going to happen for every project, I believe a near-exact cross-browser experience is attainable in many cases. As developers, our goal should not just be to get it working in every browser; our goal should be to get it working in every browser with a minimal amount of code, allowing future website maintenance to run smoothly.

In this article, I'll be describing what I believe are some of the most important CSS principles and tips that can help both new and experienced front-end developers achieve as close to a consistent cross-browser experience as possible, with as little CSS code as possible.

Read more...

Connecting The Dots With CSS3

As a web community, we’ve made a lot of exciting progress in regards to CSS3. We’ve put properties like text-shadow & border-radius to good use while stepping into background-clip and visual effects like transitions and animations. We’ve also spent a great deal of time debating how and when to implement these properties. Just because a property isn’t widely supported by browsers or fully documented at the moment, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be working with it. In fact, I’d argue the opposite.

CSS Three: Connecting The Dots

Best practices for CSS3 usage need to be hashed out in blog posts, during spare time, and outside of client projects. Coming up with creative and sensible ways to get the most out of CSS3 will require the kind of experimentation wherein developers gladly trade ten failures for a single success. Right now, there are tons of property combinations and uses out there waiting to be discovered. All we have to do is connect the dots. It’s time to get your hands dirty and innovate!

Read more...

Modern CSS Layouts, Part 2: The Essential Techniques

In Modern CSS Layouts, Part 1: The Essential Characteristics, you learned that modern, CSS-based web sites should be progressively enhanced, adaptive to diverse users, modular, efficient and typographically rich. Now that you know what characterizes a modern CSS web site, how do you build one? Here are dozens of essential techniques and tools to learn and use to achieve the characteristics of today's most successful CSS-based web pages.

Screenshot

Just as in the previous article, we're not going to be talking about design trends and styles; these styles are always changing. Instead, we're focusing on the specific techniques that you need to know to create modern CSS-based web pages of any style. For each technique or tool, we'll indicate which of the five characteristics it helps meet. To keep this shorter than an encyclopedia, we'll also just cover the basics of each technique, then point you to some useful, hand-picked resources to learn the full details.

Read more...

↑ Back to top