Posts Tagged ‘CSS’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS’.

The Problem Of CSS Form Elements

Before 1998, the birth year of CSS Level 2, form elements were already widely implemented in all major browsers. The CSS 2 specification did not address the problem of how form elements should be presented to users.

The Problem Of CSS Form Elements

Because these elements are part of the UI of every Web document, the specification’s authors preferred to leave the visual layout of such elements to the default style sheet of Web browsers.

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Case StudyThe Evolution Of The BEM Methodology

This case study is about the evolution of the BEM, a methodology that enables team members to collaborate and communicate ideas using a unified language that consists of simple yet powerful terms: blocks, elements, modifiers.

The History Of The BEM Methodology

Learn about the challenges that a big company faces when gradually building an entire ecosystem of services with an ever-growing team of developers.

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Maintainable CodeUsing White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

Right up front, I’ll offer some simple advice: In production, your code should be as performance-friendly as possible. This means, Gzip’ing, concatenating and minifying as many assets as possible, thus serving the smallest possible files and the least number of files.

Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

I don’t think anyone would argue that these suggestions aren’t best practices (even if we don’t implement them in every project). Now that we’ve got that out of the way, how can we use white space in development code to ensure that our files are as readable and maintainable as possible?

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Coding Q&A: CSS Performance, Debugging, Naming Conventions

Howdy folks! Welcome to another round of Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A — the final one, as of now. One more time, we'll answer the best questions which you sent us about CSS.

Coding Q&A: CSS Performance, Debugging, Naming Conventions

It was a great experience to run this Q&A with you - thanks a lot for sharing all your questions with us! We hope we answered them at the best possible, and we'll surely be back with new and exciting Q&A rounds in the future. Enjoy Chris' last round on CSS performance, best practices on CSS class naming, and more!

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Sneak Peek Into The Future: CSS Selectors, Level 4

The buzzword “CSS4” came out of nowhere, just as we were getting used to the fact that CSS3 is here and will stick around for some time. Browser vendors are working hard to implement the latest features, and front-end developers are creating more and more tools to be able to work with the style sheets more effectively.

Sneak Peek Into The Future: Selectors, Level 4

But now, on hearing about CSS4, you might ask, “Hey, what about CSS3? Is it over already?” We’ve been working hard to spread the goodness of CSS3, and now it’s obsolete?

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CSS Baseline: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

Vertical rhythm is clearly an important part of Web design, yet on the subject of baseline, our community seems divided and there is no consensus as to how it fits in — if at all — with our growing and evolving toolkit for designing online.

CSS Baseline: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

This may be due to a lack of understanding and appreciation of the benefits that follow from a baseline grid, but it is more likely because baseline is notoriously difficult to get right, and no one yet holds the blueprint to its successful implementation.

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Building A Relationship Between CSS & JavaScript

jQuery, Prototype, Node.js, Backbone.js, Mustache and thousands of JavaScript microlibraries all combine into a single undeniable fact: JavaScript is popular. It’s so popular, in fact, that we often find ourselves using it in places where another solution might be better in the long run.

Building A Relationship Between CSS & JavaScript

Even though we keep JavaScript, CSS and HTML in different files, the concepts behind progressive enhancement are getting all knotted up with every jQuery plugin we use and with every weird technique that crops up. Because JavaScript is so powerful, there are a lot of overlaps in capability between JavaScript and HTML (building document structure) and JavaScript and CSS (injecting style information).

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