Posts Tagged ‘CSS’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS’.

Coding Q&A With Chris CoyierSVG Fallback, Vertical Rhythm, CSS Project Structure

Howdy, folks! Welcome to more Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A. It works like this: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange.

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: SVG Fallback, Vertical Rhythm, CSS Project Structure

Your question could be about a very specific problem you're having, or it could even be a question about a philosophical approach. We’ll take all kinds. If you're interested in exploring more Q&A, there's a bunch more in my author archive.

Read more...

Free ToolCSScomb: Sorting CSS Properties, The Better Way

This is our seventh article in a series that introduces the latest useful and freely available tools and techniques, developed and released by active members of the Web design community. The first article covered PrefixFree; the second introduced Foundation, a responsive framework; the third presented Sisyphus.js, a library for Gmail-like client-side drafts. The fourth shared a free plugin called GuideGuide with us, and later we've announced Erskine's responsive grid generator Gridpak and JS Bin. This time we present CSScomb, a tool to help you sort and categorize CSS properties in your code to improve maintenance.

CSScomb

As of this writing, Web browsers support about 200 different CSS properties. In all probability, you use pretty much every single one of them in your projects. So it’s about time to think of the consistency of the ordering of CSS properties inside selector declarations as seriously as you’d think about consistency in the formatting of code. So, if you want to pay attention to your code’s style, this article is for you. There’s a simple way to automatically sort CSS properties in your projects.

Read more...

Resolution IndependenceTowards A Retina Web

With the recent announcement and release of the Retina Macbook Pro, Apple has brought double-density screens to all of the product categories in its current lineup, significantly paving the way for the next wave of display standards.

Towards A Retina Web

While the fourth-generation iPhone gave us a taste of the “non-Retina” Web in 2010, we had to wait for the third-generation iPad to fully realize how fuzzy and outdated our Web graphics and content images are.

Read more...

Back To BasicsJavaScript Events And Responding To The User

Whenever people ask me about the most powerful things in JavaScript and the DOM, I quickly arrive at events. The reason is that events in browsers are incredibly useful. Furthermore, decoupling functionality from events is a powerful idea, which is why Node.js became such a hot topic.

Back To Basics: Events And Responding To The User

Today, let’s get back to the basics of events and get you in the mood to start playing with them, beyond applying click handlers to everything or breaking the Web with <a href="javascript:void(0)"> links or messing up our HTML with onclick="foo()" inline handlers (I explained in detail in 2005 why these are bad ideas).

Read more...

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Responsive Sprites And Media Query Efficiency

Howdy, folks! Welcome to more Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A. It works like this: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange. Your question could be about a very specific problem you're having, or it could even be a question about a philosophical approach. We’ll take all kinds.

Content: A Blessing, A Bubble, A Burden

If you're interested in exploring more Q&A, there's a bunch more in my author archive.

Read more...

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell And Type On A Grid

Here we are again! Smashing Magazine’s Q&A. In case you haven't seen it before, this is how it's done: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange. Your question could be about a very specific problem you are having, or it could be a question about philosophical approach. Go wild and challenge us!

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell and Type on a Grid

We’ve done a bit of this before with a wider scope, so if you enjoy reading the Q&A, check out my author archive for more of them.

Read more...

Responsive Menus: Enhancing Navigation On Mobile Websites

Most of us are pretty familiar with responsive Web design by now. Basically, it uses a combination of a fluid layout and media queries to alter the design and layout of a website to fit different screen sizes. There are other considerations, too. For example, a lot of work has been done on responsive images, ensuring not only that images fit in a small-screen layout, but that the files downloaded to mobile devices are smaller, too.

Responsive Menus: Enhancing Navigation On Mobile Websites

But mobile design isn’t just about layout and speed: it’s also about user experience. In this article, we’ll focus on one aspect of the user experience — navigation menus — and detail a few approaches to making them work better on mobile devices.

Read more...

↑ Back to top