Posts Tagged ‘CSS’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS’.

Resolution IndependenceTowards A Retina Web

With the recent announcement and release of the Retina Macbook Pro, Apple has brought double-density screens to all of the product categories in its current lineup, significantly paving the way for the next wave of display standards.

Towards A Retina Web

While the fourth-generation iPhone gave us a taste of the “non-Retina” Web in 2010, we had to wait for the third-generation iPad to fully realize how fuzzy and outdated our Web graphics and content images are.

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Back To BasicsJavaScript Events And Responding To The User

Whenever people ask me about the most powerful things in JavaScript and the DOM, I quickly arrive at events. The reason is that events in browsers are incredibly useful. Furthermore, decoupling functionality from events is a powerful idea, which is why Node.js became such a hot topic.

Back To Basics: Events And Responding To The User

Today, let’s get back to the basics of events and get you in the mood to start playing with them, beyond applying click handlers to everything or breaking the Web with <a href="javascript:void(0)"> links or messing up our HTML with onclick="foo()" inline handlers (I explained in detail in 2005 why these are bad ideas).

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Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Responsive Sprites And Media Query Efficiency

Howdy, folks! Welcome to more Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A. It works like this: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange. Your question could be about a very specific problem you're having, or it could even be a question about a philosophical approach. We’ll take all kinds.

Content: A Blessing, A Bubble, A Burden

If you're interested in exploring more Q&A, there's a bunch more in my author archive.

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Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell And Type On A Grid

Here we are again! Smashing Magazine’s Q&A. In case you haven't seen it before, this is how it's done: you send in questions you have about CSS, and at least once a month we’ll pick out the best questions and answer them so that everyone can benefit from the exchange. Your question could be about a very specific problem you are having, or it could be a question about philosophical approach. Go wild and challenge us!

Coding Q&A With Chris Coyier: Code Smell and Type on a Grid

We’ve done a bit of this before with a wider scope, so if you enjoy reading the Q&A, check out my author archive for more of them.

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Responsive Menus: Enhancing Navigation On Mobile Websites

Most of us are pretty familiar with responsive Web design by now. Basically, it uses a combination of a fluid layout and media queries to alter the design and layout of a website to fit different screen sizes. There are other considerations, too. For example, a lot of work has been done on responsive images, ensuring not only that images fit in a small-screen layout, but that the files downloaded to mobile devices are smaller, too.

Responsive Menus: Enhancing Navigation On Mobile Websites

But mobile design isn’t just about layout and speed: it’s also about user experience. In this article, we’ll focus on one aspect of the user experience — navigation menus — and detail a few approaches to making them work better on mobile devices.

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Powerful New CSS- and JavaScript Techniques

Since our last round-up of useful CSS techniques, we've seen a lot of truly remarkable CSS geekery out there. With CSS3, some of the older techniques now have become obsolete, others have established themselves as standards, and many techniques are still in the "crazy experimentation" stage.

CSS3 Dodecahedron

Since the release of the previous post, we've been collecting, sorting, filtering and preparing a compact overview of powerful new CSS techniques. Today we finally present some of these techniques. Please note that many techniques are not only CSS-based, but use HTML5 and JavaScript. Use them right away or save them for future reference. Thanks to all of the featured designers and developers for their fantastic work!

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Classes? Where We’re Going, We Don’t Need Classes!

Classes, classes, classes everywhere. What if we don’t need CSS classes at all? What if we stopped worrying about how many classes we’re using and what we should be calling them and just finished with them once and for all? It would be no revelation to you to say that HTML elements can be styled without recourse to the class attribute, but have you considered the multitude of benefits that come from forgoing classes altogether.

Classes? Where We're Going, We Don't Need Classes!

In this article, we’ll demonstrate that the class is as antiquated and inappropriate for styling as the table is for layout, and that omitting them can discipline us to create more usable, reusable content. I appreciate that this is a contentious subject; I’ll meet you in the comments.

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