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Posts Tagged ‘CSS3’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘CSS3’.

How To Use CSS3 Media Queries To Create a Mobile Version of Your Website

CSS3 continues to both excite and frustrate web designers and developers. We are excited about the possibilities that CSS3 brings, and the problems it will solve, but also frustrated by the lack of support in Internet Explorer 8. This article will demonstrate a technique that uses part of CSS3 that is also unsupported by Internet Explorer 8. However, it doesn't matter as one of the most useful places for this module is somewhere that does have a lot of support - small devices such as the iPhone, and Android devices.

dConstruct 2010 website on a desktop browser

In this article I'll explain how, with a few CSS rules, you can create an iPhone version of your site using CSS3, that will work now. We'll have a look at a very simple example and I'll also discuss the process of adding a small screen device stylesheet to my own site to show how easily we can add stylesheets for mobile devices to existing websites.


CSS3 Design Contest Results

To get you really excited about CSS3, last month we announced the CSS3 Design Contest and encouraged designers to experiment and get creative with CSS3. As expected, we have received many creative and original submissions. To choose the winners of the contest, we considered the originality of the technique or approach and its uniqueness. The idea mattered more than the execution.

CSS3 Designs For Free Download - CSS3-charts

This process has taken a lot of time as it wasn't easy, because we received quite a few creative submissions: however, a decision had to be taken and so we thoroughly went from one competition entry to another. And the decision was made. So today, it's time to announce the winners and present the submissions to the contest.

Please notice that the contest results are experimental and may not necessarily look or work alike in different browsers. The techniques presented below should be considered as innovative, creative approaches showcasing what can be achieved with pure CSS3 and a bit of creative thinking. Please feel free to build upon these ideas to create further techniques and design solutions and make them available for the design community.


Connecting The Dots With CSS3

As a web community, we’ve made a lot of exciting progress in regards to CSS3. We’ve put properties like text-shadow & border-radius to good use while stepping into background-clip and visual effects like transitions and animations. We’ve also spent a great deal of time debating how and when to implement these properties. Just because a property isn’t widely supported by browsers or fully documented at the moment, it doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t be working with it. In fact, I’d argue the opposite.

CSS Three: Connecting The Dots

Best practices for CSS3 usage need to be hashed out in blog posts, during spare time, and outside of client projects. Coming up with creative and sensible ways to get the most out of CSS3 will require the kind of experimentation wherein developers gladly trade ten failures for a single success. Right now, there are tons of property combinations and uses out there waiting to be discovered. All we have to do is connect the dots. It’s time to get your hands dirty and innovate!


CSS3 Solutions for Internet Explorer

CSS3 is probably the hottest trend in web design right now, allowing developers the opportunity to implement a number of solutions into their projects with some very straightforward CSS while avoiding having to resort to nonsemantic markup, extra images, and complex JavaScript. Unfortunately, it's not a surprise that Internet Explorer, even in its most recent version, still does not support the majority of the properties and features introduced in CSS3.


Experienced developers understand that CSS3 can be added to new projects with progressive enhancement in mind. This ensures that content is accessible while non-supportive browsers fall back to a less-enhanced experience for the user.

But developers could face a situation where a client insists that the enhancements work cross-browser, demanding support even for IE6. In that case, I've collected together a number of options that developers can consider for those circumstances where support for a CSS3 feature is required for all versions of Internet Explorer (IE6, IE7, & IE8 — all of which are still currently in significant use).

You may be interested in the following related posts:


The New Hotness: Using CSS3 Visual Effects

Previously in this series on CSS3, we talked not only about how to create scalable and compelling buttons but about how to effectively use new CSS3 properties to speed up development and quickly create rich page elements. In this final article of the series, we'll really get into it and use CSS3 visual effects to push the envelope.

Sliding Vinyl with CSS3

Not everything in this article is practical, or even bug-free, but it's a fun primer on what's in the pipeline for Web design. To get the most from these examples, you'll have to use Safari 4 or Chrome. (Firefox 3.5 can handle most of it, but not everything: WebKit is further along than Gecko in its tentative CSS support.) We'll show you how to create impressive image galleries, build animated music players and overlay images like a pro. All set? Let's rock.


Stronger, Better, Faster Design with CSS3

In our last article about CSS3, "Pushing Your Buttons With Practical CSS3, we talked about using new CSS3 techniques like gradients, border-radius and drop-shadows to create compelling, flexible and (in some cases) hilarious buttons. In this second article we're going to focus on using those CSS techniques (and a little JavaScript) to create some practical elements and layouts.

As before, caveat coder — a lot of the CSS properties we're going to use have limited support, if any, in IE6/7 and probably 8. Firefox 3.5+ and Safari 4 are your best bet right now to see all the cool stuff going on in CSS right now (Chrome does a pretty good job, too). Why bother with CSS that has such limited support? It won't always have limited support, and these articles are all about preparing for the future of web design (and just doing some really cool stuff). Ready? Let's roll.


Pushing Your Buttons With Practical CSS3

CSS3 is the partially implemented sequel to the CSS2 spec we all know and love. It's already popping up in new browsers such as Firefox 3.5, Safari 4 and Chrome. In this article, the first of the articles that explore practical (and even far-fetched) implementation of CSS3, we start by applying CSS3 to something we all have to create: buttons.


Calls to action are critical for any website, and a compelling, attention-grabbing, clickable button goes a long way toward driving that engagement. In the past, really awesome buttons needed extra markup, sliding doors or other trickery. We'll show you here how to create nice button styles without any hacks or cheats.


CSS3 Cheat Sheet (PDF)

Just last week we released an extensive printable HTML 5 Cheat Sheet that lists all currently supported HTML 5 tags, their descriptions, their attributes and their support in HTML 4. In comments to this post we received many requests for a similar CSS 3 cheat sheet that would present the main features of CSS 3 in a handy, printable reference card.

So we asked our friend Chris Hanscom from (who created the HTML 5 cheat sheet) to create a quick reference card for CSS 3. We already encouraged you to experiment with CSS 3 in our last posts and now you can use this handy cheat sheet to use the new CSS 3 features in some modern browsers (Firefox 3.5, Opera 9.6, Safari 3+, Google Chrome and Co.). The result is a printable CSS 3 scrib sheet, created and released exclusively for the readers of Smashing Magazine. Thank you for your great work, Chris Hanscom!

CSS 3 Cheat Sheet

In this post we present a printable CSS 3 Cheat Sheet (PDF), a complete listing of all the properties, selectors types and allowed values in the current CSS 3 specification from the W3C. Each property is provided in a section that attempts to match it with the section (module) that it is most actively associated within the w3c specification. Next to each property is a listing of the expected values that that property takes (normal text shows named values it accepts and italics shows value types it will accept).


Take Your Design To The Next Level With CSS3

Cascading Style Sheets were introduced 13 years ago, and the widely adopted CSS 2.1 standard has existed for 11 years now. When we look at websites that were created 11 years ago, it's clear that we are a thousand miles away from that era. It is quite remarkable how much Web development has evolved over the years, in a way we would never have imagined then.

So why is it that, when it comes to CSS, we're stuck in the past and so afraid of experimenting? Why is it that we still use inconvenient CSS hacks and JavaScript-dependent techniques for styling? Why can't we make use of the rich CSS3 features and tools available in modern Web browsers and take the quality of our designs to the next level?

Beak uses the text-shadow-property of CSS 3

It's time to introduce CSS3 features into our projects and not be afraid to gradually incorporate CSS3 properties and selectors in our style sheets. Making our clients aware of the advantages of CSS3 (and letting older deprecated browsers fade away) is in our power, and we should act on it, especially if it means making websites more flexible and reducing development and maintenance costs.

In this article, we'll look at the advantages of CSS3 and some examples of how Web designers are already using it. By the end, we'll know a bit of what to expect from CSS3 and how we can use its new features in our projects.


Push Your Web Design Into The Future With CSS3

There are exciting new features in the pipeline for Cascading Style Sheets that will allow for an explosion of creativity in Web design. These features include CSS styling rules that are being released with the upcoming CSS3 specification.

CSS Shadow

Realistically, you won't be able to use these on your everyday client projects for another few years, but for design blogs and websites aimed at the Web design community, these features can help you push the boundaries of modern Web design today, adding that extra spice to your design and helping the industry move forward. Here are five techniques snatched from the future that you can put into practice in your website designs today.


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