Posts Tagged ‘Firefox’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Firefox’.

Interesting Web Browsers You Have Never Heard Of

There are more browsers than you are probably aware of. Apart from Firefox, Opera and Internet Explorer there is a number of promising alternatives which can improve your flexibility, increase your productivity and enrich your browsing experience.

In fact, there are over 100 existing (although not widely used) browser applications. Most of them make use of the rendering engines Trident (Internet Explorer), Gecko (Mozilla Firefox), WebCore (Safari) and Presto (Opera 7 and above). However, some of them offer large fields for experiments and exploration — e.g. 3D Engines, but also really useful browsers with advanced functionalities such as desktop-tools integration.

Recently we've selected over 20 Win/Mac/Linux-browsers, installed most of them, tested them, compared them and now present the results below. Let's take a closer look at some rather unknown, forgotten, advanced or experimental browsers. What else do we have on the horizon? What should we use? And what might we be willing to use? Apparently, between Firefox, Opera and Internet Explorer there is enough room for creative and unusual approaches.

Screenshot Browser

Please note that

  • we've tried to showcase only those browsers that use Gecko or WebCore layout engine, but we present some interesting Trident-based applications as well;
  • it wasn't our intention to display all available browsers such as Swiftweasel and Midori. We've selected the ones we've found most useful and promising.

IceWeasel

This is Swiftweasel, an optimized build of the Mozilla Firefox web browser for Linux.

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Who Is Your Visitor? An Average Profile

You never really know who is going to visit your website next. You have no idea which configuration will be used, what browser will be installed, which screen resolution will be in use. However, since you'd like to comfort most of your web users, you need to know their habits and the profile of your average visitor — to adapt the design and layout to your users' needs.

Since only 50.4% maximise their browser windows, the screen resolution of 1024x768 doesn't necessarily mean that your users are browsing with 1024px wide screen through your website.

Only 50.4% maximise their browser windows
According to Roger Johansson's survey, only 50.4% of users maximise their browser windows.

Nothing is more valuable than the statistics you've collected with an analytics tool installed on your website; however particularly in the beginning of a new project it's nice to have some good idea of what kind of configuration your visitors will probably use.

In this post we'd like to present the results from recent studies of browser market share, used OS and preferred screen resolution worldwide. Please notice that this data is only an approximation; we've used a number of different sources to get the average numbers we present below. Besides, statistics always depends on the readership and the topic of your project.

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Browser Tests, Services and Compatibility Test Suites

Cross-browser compatibility is still one of the most complex issues when it comes to web-development. Web standards usually guarantee a (relatively) high degree of consistency, however no browser is perfect and particularly older browsers have always been quite good at surprising web-developers with their creative understanding of (X)HTML/CSS-code. Still you need to make sure that (at least) most visitors of your web-site can use it, navigate through it and find what they're looking for as quickly as possible.

Browsers Tests Are Necessary
The truth is that a) you never know who might type in your url in his/her navigation toolbar and b) the browser-environment is still very quirky and the risk of inconsistent presentation is simply too high to ignore it. For instance, different browsers and operating systems use different techniques for rendering fonts (Win vs. Mac on handling fonts). The font size isn't identical on different platforms and some fonts might not be installed on the user's system.

Internet Explore has the browser usage share of 46%
Worldwide browser usage: IE6 dominates; IE 7 has already more users than Firefox 2. Stand: 01.10.2007. Source.

Firefox on Linux doesn't display web-sites as Firefox on Windows does. As bonus web-developers have to cope with dozens of versions and, of course, Internet Explorer 6 — 46% of browser usage share, which is a true godsend for hardcoders and hackers. It's almost impossible to keep all possible problems in mind — a detailed test helps you to identify the critical issues — also and particularly if these are the smallest details of your layout.

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Firefox Themes in an Overview

It's amazing if you think about it. The new generation of web-browsers has become so flexible, so adaptable and so easy to use that you can design and use it according to your personal taste and needs. So if you are a Mozilla Firefox user, you can add almost any functionality you ever thought about via external extensions. Furthermore, you can also personalize your web-browser, changing its look with Firefox Themes. Thus you can let your browser have a fresh Vista look or appear like Opera, Internet Explorer or Mac-Browser. But which look can you choose to guarantee the most enjoyable browsing experience? Well, it's a tough one.

In fact, there are many of them. We've selected some of the most beautiful Firefox Themes, which work in Firefox 2 and listed them below. Usually the changes concern not only the visual appearance and interface (icons and background colors), but also the functionality of the "adapted" Firefox - e.g. extensions.

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