Posts Tagged ‘HTML’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘HTML’.

A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

You’ve probably heard all the noise about Web Components and how they’re going to change Web development forever. If you haven’t, you’ve either been living under a rock, are reading this article by accident, or have a full, busy life which doesn’t leave you time to read about unstable and speculative Web technologies. Well, not me.

A Detailed Introduction To Custom Elements

Web Components are a suite of connected technologies aimed at making elements reusable across the Web. The lion’s share of the conversation has been around Shadow DOM, but probably the most transformative technology of the suite is Custom Elements, a method of defining your own elements, with their own behavior and properties.

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Reinventing The Tech Conference Experience

If you had to name one thing that could have been better at the last conference or meetup you attended, what would it be? I bet you’d say that the content or the interaction could have been better in some way. I created Onslyde to solve this problem. It’s a free service and open-source project that (hopefully) will make public speaking easier and conferences better.

Reinventing The Tech Conference Experience

The motivation for the project came from my own speaking engagements in the tech industry. I wanted to see how many people in the audience actually agreed or disagreed with what I was saying. I also wanted to leverage their experience and knowledge to create a better learning environment.

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The Future Of Video In Web Design

Federico was the only other kid on the block with a dedicated ISDN line, so I gave him a call. It had taken six hours of interminable waiting (peppered with frantic bouts of cursing), but I had just watched 60 choppy seconds of the original Macintosh TV commercial in Firefox, and I had to tell someone. It blew my mind.

The Future Of Video In Web Design

Video on the Web has improved quite a bit since that first jittery low-res commercial I watched on my Quadra 605 back in 7th grade. But for the most part, videos are still separate from the Web, cordoned off by iframes and Flash and bottled up in little windows in the center of the page. They’re a missed opportunity for Web designers everywhere.

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Challenging CSS Best Practices

Editor’s Note: This article features techniques that are used in practice by Yahoo! and question coding techniques that we are used to today. You might be interested in reading Decoupling HTML From CSS by Jonathan Snook, On HTML Elements Identifiers by Tim Huegdon and Atomic Design With Sass by Robin Rendle as well. Please keep in mind: some of the mentioned techniques are not considered to be best practices.

When it comes to CSS, I believe that the sacred principle of “separation of concerns” (SoC) has lead us to accept bloat, obsolescence, redundancy, poor caching and more. Now, I’m convinced that the only way to improve how we author style sheets is by moving away from this principle.

Challenging CSS Best Practices

For those of you who have never heard of the SoC principle in the context of Web design, it relates to something commonly known as the “separation of the three layers”: structure, presentation, behavior.

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Thinking Inside The Box With Vanilla JavaScript

During the past four or five years of blogging regularly and doing research for other writing projects, I’ve come across probably thousands of articles on JavaScript.

Thinking Inside The Box With Vanilla JavaScript

I think those articles are great, and I hope we see more of them. But sometimes the simplest JavaScript features are sitting right under our noses and we just haven’t had a lot of exposure to them. I’m talking about native, more-or-less cross-browser features that have been in the language for some time.

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Semantic CSS With Intelligent Selectors

“Form ever follows function. This is the law.” So said the architect and “father of skyscrapers” Louis Sullivan. For architects not wishing to crush hundreds of innocent people under the weight of a colossal building, this rule of thumb is pretty good.

Semantic CSS With Intelligent Selectors

In design, you should always lead with function, and allow form to emerge as a result. If you were to lead with form, making your skyscraper look pretty would be easier, but at the cost of producing something pretty dangerous. So much for architects. What about front-end architects — or “not real architects,” as we are sometimes known?

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Introducing Jelly Navigation Menu: When Canvas Meets PaperJS

It's our great pleasure to support active members of the Web design and development community. Today, we're proud to present the Jelly Navigation Menu that shows the power of PaperJS and TweenJS when used together. This article is yet another golden nugget of our series of various tools, libraries and techniques that we've published here on Smashing Magazine: LiveStyle, PrefixFree, Foundation, Sisyphus.js, GuideGuide, Gridpak, JS Bin and CSSComb. — Ed.

Jelly Navigation Menu With CSS And CoffeeScript

There is no doubt that the Web helps designers and developers find the best inspiration and resources for their projects. Even though there are a bunch of different tutorials and tips available online, I feel that HTML5 canvas techniques are missing the most. Good news: I had the chance to fulfill this wide gap. In this article, I would like to share my experience and story of how I brought the "Jelly Navigation Menu" to life. Credits go to Capptivate.co and Ashleigh Brennan's icons — they were my inspiration for this project.

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