Posts Tagged ‘HTML’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘HTML’.

Useful jQuery Function Demos For Your Projects

Every aspiring web developer should know about the power of JavaScript and how it can be used effectively to enhance the ways in which see and interact with web pages. Fortunately, to help us be more productive we can use the power of JavaScript Libraries and this article we will take a good look at jQuery in action.

50 jQuery Function Demos for Aspiring Web Developers

In a nutshell, jQuery is a leading JavaScript Library that can perform wonders with your web pages and makes your web development life much easier and more enjoyable. The rise in popularity of jQuery since its arrival in 2006 has seen an estimated over 24 million websites (50% of the 10,000 most visited websites) currently reaping the benefits and as Google Trends suggests it's the popular JavaScript Library of choice.

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Develop A One-Of-A-Kind CSS / JS-Based Game Portfolio

A portfolio is a must-have for any designer or developer who wants to stake their claim on the Web. It should be as unique as possible, and with a bit of HTML, CSS and JavaScript, you could have a one-of-a-kind portfolio that capably represents you to potential clients.

Develop A One-Of-A-Kind CSS/JS-Based Game Portfolio

Before getting down to business, let’s talk about portfolios. A portfolio is a great tool for Web designers and developers to show off their skills. As with any project, spend some time learning to develop a portfolio and doing a little research on what’s going on in the Web design industry, so that the portfolio presents you as an up to date, innovative and inspiring person. All the while, keep in mind that going with the flow isn’t necessarily the best way to stand out from the crowd.

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Decoupling HTML From CSS

For years, the Web standards community has talked about the separation of concerns. Separate your CSS from your JavaScript from your HTML. We all do that, right? CSS goes into its own file; JavaScript goes in another; HTML is left by itself, nice and clean.

Decoupling HTML From CSS

CSS Zen Garden proved that we can alter a design into a myriad of permutations simply by changing the CSS. However, we’ve rarely seen the flip side of this — the side that is more likely to occur in a project: the HTML changes. We modify the HTML and then have to go back and revise any CSS that goes with it.

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A New Front-End Methodology: BEM

This article is the sixth in our new series that introduces the latest, useful and freely available tools and techniques, developed and released by active members of the Web design community. The first article covered PrefixFree; the second introduced Foundation, a responsive framework; the third presented Sisyphus.js, a library for Gmail-like client-side drafts, the fourth covered a free plugin called GuideGuide and the fifth presented Erskine Design's responsive grid generator Gridpak. Today, we are happy to feature a toolkit devised by Yandex: BEM.

A New Front-End Methodology: BEM

BEM stands for "Block", "Element", "Modifier". It is a front-end methodology: a new way of thinking when developing Web interfaces. This article will elaborate on the theory as well as the practice of building websites at Yandex—one of the leading internet companies in Russia.

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How To Create Web Animations With Paper.js

The Web is just starting to use animation well. For years, animated GIFs and Flash ruled. Text moved and flashed, but it was never seamless. Animations had boxes around them like YouTube videos. HTML5 canvas changes everything about Web animation.

How To Create Web Animations With Paper.js

The canvas element makes it possible to integrate drawings and animations with the rest of your page. You can combine them with text and make animations interactive. This drawing mechanism is powerful, but very low-level. Animations get more power and need less coding when you combine the canvas tag with higher-level libraries such as Paper.js. This article introduces HTML5 animation and walks you through creating an animation of dandelion seeds blowing in the wind.

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HTML5 Semantics

Much of the excitement we’ve seen so far about HTML5 has been for the new APIs: local storage, application cache, Web workers, 2-D drawing and the like. But let’s not overlook that HTML5 brings us 30 new elements to mark up documents and applications, boosting the total number of elements available to us to over 100. Sexy yet hollow demos aside, even the most JavaScript-astic Web 2.0-alicious application will likely have textual content that needs to be marked up sensibly, so let’s look at some of the new elements to make sure that your next project is as semantic as it is interactive.

HTML5 Semantics

To keep this article from turning into a book, we won’t look at each in depth. Instead, this is a taster menu: you can see what’s available, and there are links that I’ve vetted for when you want to learn more. Along the way, we’ll see that HTML5 semantics are carefully designed to extend the current capabilities of HTML, while always enabling users of older browsers to access the content. We’ll also see that semantic markup is not “nice to have,” but is rather a cornerstone of Web development, because it is what enhances accessibility, searchability, internationalization and interoperability.

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Pursuing Semantic Value

Disclaimer: This post by Jeremy Keith is one of the many reactions to our recent article on the pursuit of semantic value by Divya Manian. Both articles are published in the Opinion column section in which we provide active members of the community with the opportunity to share their thoughts and ideas publicly.

Divya Manian, one of the super-smart web warriors behind HTML5 Boilerplate, has published an article called Our Pointless Pursuit Of Semantic Value. I’m afraid I have to agree with Patrick’s comment when he says that the abrasive title, the confrontational tone and strawman arguments at the start of the article make it hard to get to the real message.

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