Posts Tagged ‘HTML’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘HTML’.

Local Storage And How To Use It On Websites

Storing information locally on a user's computer is a powerful strategy for a developer who is creating something for the Web. In this article, we'll look at how easy it is to store information on a computer to read later and explain what you can use that for.

The main problem with HTTP as the main transport layer of the Web is that it is stateless. This means that when you use an application and then close it, its state will be reset the next time you open it. If you close an application on your desktop and re-open it, its most recent state is restored.

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This is why, as a developer, you need to store the state of your interface somewhere. Normally, this is done server-side, and you would check the user name to know which state to revert to. But what if you don't want to force people to sign up? This is where local storage comes in. You would keep a key on the user's computer and read it out when the user returns.

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HTML5: The Facts And The Myths

You can't escape it. Everyone's talking about HTML5. it's perhaps the most hyped technology since people started putting rounded corners on everything and using unnecessary gradients. In fact, a lot of what people call HTML5 is actually just old-fashioned DHTML or AJAX. Mixed in with all the information is a lot of misinformation, so here, JavaScript expert Remy Sharp and Opera's Bruce Lawson look at some of the myths and sort the truth from the common misconceptions.

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Once upon a time, there was a lovely language called HTML, which was so simple that writing websites with it was very easy. So, everyone did, and the Web transformed from a linked collection of physics papers to what we know and love today. Most pages didn't conform to the simple rules of the language (because their authors were rightly concerned more with the message than the medium), so every browser had to be forgiving with bad code and do its best to work out what its author wanted to display.

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When One Word Is More Meaningful Than A Thousand

You may be wondering why you're reading about the good old semantics on Smashing Magazine. Why doesn't this article deal with HTML5 or another fancy new language: anything but plain, clear, tired old semantics. You may even find the subject boring, being a devoted front-end developer. You don't need a lecture on semantics. You've done a good job keeping up with the Web these last 10 years, and you know pretty much all there is to know.

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People looking for bananas might think twice before buying these.

I'm writing about HTML semantics because I've noticed that semantic values are often handled sloppily and are sometimes neglected, even today. A huge void remains in semantic consistency and clarity, begging to be filled. We need better and more consistent naming conventions and smarter ways to construct HTML templates, to give us more consistent, clearer and readable HTML code. If that doesn't sound like paradise, I don't know what does.

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Coding An HTML 5 Layout From Scratch

HTML5 and CSS3 have just arrived (kinda), and with them a whole new battle for the 'best markup' trophy has begun. Truth to be told, all these technologies are mere tools waiting for a skilled developer to work on the right project. As developers we shouldn't get into pointless discussions of which markup is the best. They all lead to nowhere. Rather, we must get a brand new ideology and modify our coding habits to keep the web accessible.

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While it is true HTML5 and CSS3 are both a work in progress and is going to stay that way for some time, there's no reason not to start using it right now. After all, time's proven that implementation of unfinished specifications does work and can be easily mistaken by a complete W3C recommendation. That's were Progressive Enhancement and Graceful Degradation come into play.

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Misunderstanding Markup: XHTML 2/HTML 5 Comic Strip

Since the official announcement of W3C to stop working on the development of XHTML 2 in the end of 2009 and increase resources on HTML 5 instead, there has been a lot of confusion and various debates about the "proper"markup language for modern and future web-development. With XHTML 1.0, XHTML 2, HTML 4, HTML 5 and XHTML 5 we have so many languages that it's really getting hard to keep track!

HTML 5 vs. XHTML 2

Now that the development of XHTML 2 is discontinued, should we stick to XHTML 1.0 or move forward to HTML 5 or better prefer the old HTML 4? Let's set things straight once and for all. In this post we are trying to clear up the confusion, explain what is what and describe what markup language you can use for your web-sites.

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HTML5 and The Future of the Web

Some have embraced it, some have discarded it as too far in the future, and some have abandoned a misused friend in favor of an old flame in preparation. Whatever side of the debate you're on, you've most likely heard all the blogging chatter surrounding the "new hotness" that is HTML5. It's everywhere, it's coming, and you want to know everything you can before it's old news.

Things like jQuery plugins, formatting techniques, and design trends change very quickly throughout the Web community. And for the most part we've all accepted that some of the things we learn today can be obsolete tomorrow, but that's the nature of our industry.

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When looking for some stability, we can usually turn to the code itself as it tends to stay unchanged for a long time (relatively speaking). So when something comes along and changes our code, it's a big deal; and there are going to be some growing pains we'll have to work through. Luckily, rumor has it, that we have once less change to worry about.

In this article, I'm hoping to give you some tips and insight into HTML5 to help ease the inevitable pain that comes with transitioning to a slightly different syntax. Welcome to HTML5.

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