Posts Tagged ‘HTML5’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘HTML5’.

Free HTML5/CSS3 WordPress 3.1+ Theme With Responsive Layout: Yoko

In this post we are glad to present a yet another freebie: a responsive WordPress theme Yoko which was designed by talented designers Ellen and Manuel from Elmastudio and released for the Web design community. Of course, the theme is absolutely free to use in private and commerical projects.

Yoko WordPress theme

Yoko is a modern and flexible WordPress theme. With the responsive layout based on CSS3 media queries, the theme adjusts to different screen sizes. The design is optimized for big desktop screens, tablets and small smartphone screens. To make your blog more individual, you can use the new post formats (like gallery, aside or quote), choose your own logo and header image, customize the background and link color.

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Syncing Content With HTML5 Video

One of the main changes from HTML4 to HTML5 is that the new specification breaks a few of the boundaries that browsers have been confined to. Instead of restricting user interaction to text, links, images and forms, HTML5 promotes multimedia, from a generic <object> element to a highly specified <video> and <audio> element, and with a rich API to access in pure JavaScript.

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Native multimedia capability has a few benefits. For instance, end users have full control over the multimedia. The native controls of browsers allow users to save videos locally or email them to friends. Also, HTML5 video and audio are keyboard-enabled by default, which is a great accessibility benefit.

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The HTML5 Logo: What Do You Think?

This has been an interesting week for the web design community, to say the least. The W3C revealed a new HTML5 logo to help designers and developers ‘tell the world' that they’re using HTML5. The logo was designed by Ocupop design agency, and it's licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0, a permissive license that allows 'remixing' of the licensed work.

The HTML5 Logo: What Do You Think?

The logo has been made available on stickers and t-shirts, and there’s a gallery already promoting examples of the logo in use. The logo’s official site includes a “badge builder” that customizes its orientation and allows you to add supplementary icons to indicate support for the different technologies that have become associated with HTML5.

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Falling for HTML5: Finding Love in the Little Things

I've lost count of the number of posts that have been written about the big features of HTML5: amongst the most anticipated being rich media (video, audio, canvas) and JavaScript APIs. However, call me a woman of simple tastes, but this is not the sort of thing that gets me swooning. What does? The small additions to the spec that will make the world of difference to the way I code day-in, day-out. This is the stuff fairy tales are made of.

HTML5 Logo

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HTML has had a troubled past. It was never really designed for what we are now accomplishing with it. This is in part a testimony to its flexibility and adaptability, but there have been inevitable growing pains.

So what was it originally intended for? Well it’s there in the name: Hyper-Text Markup Language. Yes, text; hyper-text to be more exact. Not layout, or images, or video, or fonts, or menus — or any of the other frippery that it now incorporates.

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Why We Should Start Using CSS3 and HTML5 Today

For a while now, here on Smashing Magazine, we have taken notice of how many designers are reluctant to embrace the new technologies such as CSS3 or HTML5 because of the lack of full cross-browser support for these technologies. Many designers are complaining about the numerous ways how the lack of cross-browser compatibility is effectively holding us back and tying our hands — keeping us from completely being able to shine and show off the full scope of our abilities in our work. Many are holding on to the notion that once this push is made, we will wake to a whole new Web — full of exciting opportunities just waiting on the other side. So they wait for this day. When in reality, they are effectively waiting for Godot.

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Just like the elusive character from Beckett’s classic play, this day of complete cross-browser support is not ever truly going to find its dawn and deliver us this wonderful new Web where our work looks the same within the window of any and every Web browser. Which means that many of us in the online reaches, from clients to designers to developers and on, are going to need to adjust our thinking so that we can realistically approach the Web as it is now, and more than likely how it will be in the future.

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Learning to Love HTML5

It seems that new resources and articles for teaching and promoting HTML5 are popping up almost daily. We've been given HTML5 templates in the form of the HTML5 boilerplate and HTML5 Reset (although they both go beyond just HTML5 stuff). We've got a plethora of books to choose from that cover HTML5 and its related technologies. We've got shivs, galleries, and a physician to help heal your HTML5 maladies. And don't forget the official spec.

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From my own vantage point — aside from a few disputes about what the term "HTML5" should and shouldn't mean — the web design and development community has for the most part embraced all the new technologies and semantics with a positive attitude.

While it's certainly true that HTML5 has the potential to change the web for the better, the reality is that these kinds of major changes can be difficult to grasp and embrace. I'm personally in the process of gaining a better understanding of the subtleties of HTML5's various new features, so I thought I would discuss some things associated with HTML5 that appear to be somewhat confusing.

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Local Storage And How To Use It On Websites

Storing information locally on a user's computer is a powerful strategy for a developer who is creating something for the Web. In this article, we'll look at how easy it is to store information on a computer to read later and explain what you can use that for.

The main problem with HTTP as the main transport layer of the Web is that it is stateless. This means that when you use an application and then close it, its state will be reset the next time you open it. If you close an application on your desktop and re-open it, its most recent state is restored.

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This is why, as a developer, you need to store the state of your interface somewhere. Normally, this is done server-side, and you would check the user name to know which state to revert to. But what if you don't want to force people to sign up? This is where local storage comes in. You would keep a key on the user's computer and read it out when the user returns.

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