Posts Tagged ‘Illustrator’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Illustrator’.

Smashing Book #4: Behind The Scenes

If you’re a graphic designer, you will often have to work with off-the-shelf material created by others — for instance, combining ready-to-use fonts with images from a photographer or stock website. Also, you’ll often have to follow the branding already developed by someone else.

Smashing Book #4: Behind The Scenes

It’s OK; it’s a part of the job, and you shouldn’t be bothered by it. But the part of a project that almost every graphic designer likes and is proud of the most is something that you can do from scratch, something that you have control over and can sign off on confidently: illustration.

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Blueprints For Web And Print: Specctr, A Free Adobe Illustrator Plugin

Have you ever submitted design files to a development team for production and a few weeks later gotten something back that looks nothing like your original work? Many designers and design teams make the mistake of thinking that their work is done once they’ve completed the visual design stage.

Blueprints For Web And Print: Specctr, A Free Adobe Illustrator Plugin

A design is more than a simple drawing on a canvas in Illustrator, Fireworks or Photoshop; it is a representation of function. “Form follows function” is a well-known principle, first coined in 1896 by the architect Louis Sullivan. How will the website work? How will that section fold? What happens when you hover over this button? How does that menu function?

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How To Create A Water Lily In Illustrator

Water lilies are beautiful flowers and ideal tutorial material. To get to the final result you’ll do a lot of clever actions which mostly involve rotating and duplicating, and there is a lot of room for experimentation as well. For instance, you can try out different ways on how you build up the layers of petals, and play with different shades of pinkish gradients.

How To Create A Water Lily In Illustrator

This tutorial gives you the basic steps I followed, but while I was creating this flower I did actually way more than what I’m writing here. You see, every creation is never straightforward or perfect just right away. It takes some trial and error, because I also needed to find the method that can be most easily explained.

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The Joy Of Illustrated Maps In The Era Of Google Earth

In my career as a freelance illustrator, map-making has become a favorite specialty of mine. With each map assignment, I virtually travel across the globe, visiting places I’ve never been. Most recent was a “trip” to New Zealand for a sampling of local Wellington beer for Draft Magazine.

The Joy Of Illustrated Maps In The Era Of Google Earth

My maps are designed to appear next to magazine stories about trips to faraway places, or about the best restaurants in a nearby neighborhood. I create them in Adobe Illustrator, and I relish the research process as much as working on the drawings themselves.

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Reviewing Adobe Illustrator’s Extensive Gradients Toolset

While vector based artwork lets designers take advantage of small file sizes and lossless scaling it can also be limiting when trying to add depth and richness to a design. Adobe Illustrator offers a plethora of gradient tools that can help artist produce more organic and vivid pieces.

Tutorial

This extended video tutorial covers a wide variety of topics including basic gradient tools (0:30), the appearance pannel and multiple gradient fill layers (2:30), creating gradients with the blending tool (3:45), gradient strokes (6:30), gradient mesh (7:45), using gradients with type (14:00), wrapping gradients with envelope distort (16:30), and using opacity masks.

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Mixing Up Illustration: Combining Analog And Digital Techniques

People often ask how I arrived at a finished illustration. Honestly, it’s different every time, but it always starts with a hand-drawn sketch. Sometimes, I paint it completely by hand; sometimes I’ll scan in a pencil drawing. Many of my pieces are 100% analog that I’ll show only at shops or galleries. Use anything you can; if the illustration would work as a wood carving, go that route. There are concrete steps one can take, but they certainly don’t have to be the same every time. My goal is to take a sketch or idea as far as it can go — and also, to get out of my comfort zone and challenge myself with every new job. For this article, I’ll use handcrafted brushes and Photoshop as my tools.

Brush Close Up

Concepting for me always starts with pencil and paper. If there is one consistent element through all of my pieces, it’s sketching. I love to draw. If I could establish and execute everything with a single pencil drawing, I would. The best thing to do is keep some type of sketchbook or journal with you as much as possible. Milton Glaser said it best: “Drawing is visual thinking.” Drawing creates many possibilities for any idea you might have. It’s then when the character’s personality starts to emerge. Then, I’ll add some volume to the sketch to show where the textures should really come through.

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The Whys And The Hows Of Textures In Web Design

Texture is becoming integral to design. It’s gone beyond being a trend — it’s now a simple and effective way to add depth to a website. Wielding the power of texture is a great responsibility. It increases the effectiveness of websites and is a quality tool in the arsenal of designers. It can guide the user’s eye and emphasize the importance of key elements.

The header from Poco People demonstrates use of a textured brand on a clean background.

However, texture has long been synonymous with “dirty” or “grungy” design. Its overuse can be seen throughout the world of music group websites and has left a bad taste in the mouths of designers. Due to its frequent misuse, its benefits have long been overlooked. Texture can bring a website together, but should not be the main focus.

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