Posts Tagged ‘iOS’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘iOS’.

iOS Prototyping With TAP And Adobe Fireworks (Part 2)

In the previous article in this series, "iOS Prototyping With Adobe Fireworks and TAP, Part 1: Laying the Foundation," I looked in detail at the four major stages that all of our projects at Cooper go through, as well as our approach to Fireworks PNG organization, and the main components of Fireworks (pages, shared layers, symbols and styles).

iOS Prototyping With TAP And Adobe Fireworks (Part 2)

Now we can start actually building the prototype. First, let me try to sum it up quickly: to create a “live” iOS prototype, you only need to perform the following six steps:

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iOS Prototyping With TAP And Adobe Fireworks (Part 1)

One of the strengths of Adobe Fireworks lies in its ability to produce basic-level prototypes in HTML format for the purpose of sharing concepts, evaluating them and conducting usability tests. But did you know that you can use Fireworks in combination with other tools to create complex iOS prototypes (for both the iPhone and iPad) with similar ease?

iOS Prototyping With TAP And Adobe Fireworks (Part 1)

In this series of three articles, you’ll learn how to use Adobe Fireworks together with another tool, called TAP, to create prototypes with animated transitions.

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Introducing New iOS6 Features In Mobile Safari

If you've had half an eye on the tech press over the last few weeks, you'll be aware of the update to iOS, or at least of its replacement of Google maps with the new iOS Maps app.

Introducing New iOS6 Features In Mobile Safari

Stories of parks appearing where once there were roads, seas disappearing and more, abound. I'm not going to wade into the debate about whether or not Apple should have done this or whether the new app is an improvement or not, but instead I'm going to focus on the update to mobile Safari — and specifically, what it means for Web developers.

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Workflow OptimizationDesign Cutting Edge iOS Apps With Adobe Fireworks

Since the release of iPhone 4 and the iPad 3 (known as "The new iPad"), Apple has doubled the resolution of the displays, which are now 640 x 960 pixels (iPhone 4 and 4s), 1536 x 2048 pixels (iPad 3), and 640 x 1136 pixels (iPhone 5).

Design Cutting Edge iOS Apps With Adobe Fireworks

To keep a good-looking user interface for both the old as well as the "Retina" resolution, Apple decided not to resize all graphics or make use of scalable image formats (such as SVG), but instead it now requires two sets of graphics for each device. When building an app for iOS, you have to provide the normal-sized and double-sized images for each graphic. This is where the strongest Adobe Fireworks feature comes in — the capability to create sharp vector elements which scale up and down without any quality loss.

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Transform A Tablet Into An Affordable Kiosk For Your Clients

Twenty minutes after unboxing my first iPad, I realized this device’s potential to revolutionize the world of kiosks. Ten years ago, my team and I worked with Honda to develop touchscreen kiosks for its dealerships. Potential buyers could customize their purchase with a few touches of their fingertips. While innovative at the time, these early interactive kiosks didn’t come cheap, running Honda $3,000 to $5,000 per installation. Today, we can create such a kiosk for a fraction of the price.

iPad mounted in a restaurant setting

Which industries are the most likely candidates for tablet kiosks? Four that immediately spring to mind are hotels, restaurants, museums and retailers. Kiosks help streamline information-gathering processes, such as signing up for mailing lists, making reservations, ordering products and services and checking in and out of locations. By automating these processes, the kiosk eliminates the customer’s frustration from waiting in line to speak with a representative and, likewise, frees the employees to focus their energies on higher-level tasks.

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The Success FormulaHow To Succeed With Your Mobile App

Most apps fail. This cruel reality has led many disillusioned developers to conclude, often subconsciously, that succeeding on the App Store is like striking it rich in the gold rush: you just need to get lucky. The idea of luck is a dangerous sedative to ease the pain of failure. Pain is a good thing. It shows something is wrong. If my app fails, I want to know why.

How To Succeed With Your Mobile App

Instead of blaming forces beyond our control, why not look at what folks like tap tap tap and Tapbots are doing to succeed again and again and again. While applying this formula flawlessly is nearly impossible, working towards it will dramatically increase your chances of success. These concepts are based on the iOS platform, but many of the principles apply to other platforms as well. Any successful app rests on the foundation of a solid idea, because the idea determines the ultimate potential of the execution. Avoid the temptation of jumping straight into execution after having an epiphany in the shower. A little bit of research up front can save you a lot of pain down the road.

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A Field Guide To Mobile App Testing

Testers are often thought of as people who find bugs, but have you ever considered how testers actually approach testing? Do you ever wonder what testers actually do, and how they can add value to a typical technology project? I’d like to take you through the thought process of testers and discuss the types of things they consider when testing a mobile app.

A Guide To Mobile App Testing

The intention here is to highlight their thought processes and to show the coverage and depth that testers often go to. At the heart of testing is the capability to ask challenging and relevant questions. You are on your way to becoming a good tester if you combine investigative and questioning skills with knowledge of technology and products.

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