Posts Tagged ‘iOS’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘iOS’.

A Field Guide To Mobile App Testing

Testers are often thought of as people who find bugs, but have you ever considered how testers actually approach testing? Do you ever wonder what testers actually do, and how they can add value to a typical technology project? I’d like to take you through the thought process of testers and discuss the types of things they consider when testing a mobile app.

A Guide To Mobile App Testing

The intention here is to highlight their thought processes and to show the coverage and depth that testers often go to. At the heart of testing is the capability to ask challenging and relevant questions. You are on your way to becoming a good tester if you combine investigative and questioning skills with knowledge of technology and products.

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App developmentA Guide To iOS App Development For Web Designers

As a designer looking to broaden your skill set, you’ve decided that learning to make native apps for Apple’s iOS platform is an attractive and potentially lucrative prospect. With a frisson of excitement, you start to do some research. The euphoria is short-lived however, as you quickly discover that unless you are an experienced programmer, the task is far from easy.

iOS SDK For Designers

This post will help you get to know the iOS SDK a little better. It leads you through some choreographed steps of iOS app development, even if you have little or no programming knowledge. It covers some key principles and applies these directly to something useful and relevant: the creation of a simple but functioning portfolio app for the iPhone.

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Get Started Writing iOS Apps With RubyMotion

Everyone is trying to craft the next beautiful iOS app, but building on Apple’s platform has traditionally required experience in a niche programming language, Objective-C. However, with the release of RubyMotion, anyone can make a completely native iOS app using the power of Ruby.

Get Started Writing iOS Apps With RubyMotion

Developers have tried to get around the Objective-C hurdle by making HTML and JavaScript hybrid apps using tools like PhoneGap and Trigger, but the result can be a substandard user experience. Plus, mobile-centric Web development is yet another narrow skill set that potential developers have to learn.

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Designing for iPhone 4 Retina Display: Techniques and Workflow

The iPhone 4 features a vastly superior display resolution (614400 pixels) over previous iPhone models, containing quadruple the 153600-pixel display of the iPhone 3GS. The screen is the same physical size, so those extra dots are used for additional detail — twice the detail horizontally, and twice vertically. For developers only using Apple’s user interface elements, most of the work is already done for you.

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For those with highly custom, image-based interfaces, a fair amount of work will be required in scaling up elements to take full advantage of the iPhone 4 Retina display. Scaling user interfaces for higher detail displays — or increasing size on the same display — isn’t a new problem. Interfaces that can scale are said to have resolution independence.

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Web Development For The iPhone And iPad: Getting Started

According to AdMob, the iPhone operating system makes up 50% of the worldwide smartphone market, with the next-highest OS being Android at 24%. Sales projections for the Apple iPad run anywhere from one to four million units in the first year. Like it or not, the iPhone OS, and Safari in particular, have become a force to be reckoned with for Web developers. If you haven't already, it's time to dive in and familiarize yourself with the tools required to optimize websites and Web applications for this OS.

iPad GUI

Thankfully, Safari on iPhone OS is a really great browser. Just like Safari 4 for the desktop, it has great CSS3 and HTML5 support. It also has some slick interface elements right out of the box, which sometimes vary between the iPhone and iPad. Lastly, because the iPhone OS has been around for quite some time now, a lot of resources are available.

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Useful Design Tips For Your iPad App

With tools like Appcelerator's Titanium and some JavaScript programming skill, creating native iPhone and iPad apps is simple. The danger is in not being always on the look-out for the kind of design pitfalls that plague many products in the App Store. In this post, we'll consider some design tips that will get you on the road to iPad success.

Landscape mode in iPad

Apps will define the iPad, it's true. But in developing your app idea, which comes first, the idea or the device? Good news: neither. It's people! When brainstorming and researching ideas for your app, step back and consider the context in which the device will be used by real live people. How does the iPad fit into our lives? In what situations would we prefer this device to a laptop or iPod Touch?

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iPhone Apps Design Mistakes: Disregard Of Context

The iPhone will always be part of a much bigger picture. How well you address human and environmental factors will greatly determine the success of your product. All too often, iPhone developers create products in isolation from their customers. In order to create really appealing applications, developers must stop focusing only on the mechanisms of the apps. Zoom out: understand the person using the application, as well as the complex environmental factors surrounding that person.

To better understand the context of these design challenges, we’ll highlight several levels of human and environmental factors. We start with level 1: the app itself. This is how many developers view their apps. As a developer, you have a vision of what your product should look like and why customers will turn their attention to it. However, if you observe your product so closely, you may put it in the wrong context and design it for the wrong purposes and for the wrong users. This is why you need to zoom out.

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