Posts Tagged ‘JavaScript’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘JavaScript’.

Chartist.js, An Open-Source Library For Responsive Charts

The list of charting libraries for the web is already quite long, and you might ask yourself why we would need to make it any longer. Whenever you need to develop an application’s dashboard, embed some usage statistics or simply visualize some data, you will find yourself looking for a charting library that fits your needs.

Chartist.js, An Open Source Library For Responsive Charts

Chartist was developed for a very particular need: to create simple responsive charts. While other charting libraries do a great job of visualizing data, something is always missing to satisfy this simple yet demanding need.

Read more...

Making A Complete Polyfill For The HTML5 Details Element

HTML5 introduced a bunch of new tags, one of which is <details>. This element is a solution for a common UI component: a collapsible block. Almost every framework, including Bootstrap and jQuery UI, has its own plugin for a similar solution, but none conform to the HTML5 specification — probably because most were around long before <details> got specified and, therefore, represent different approaches.

Making A Complete Polyfill For The HTML5 Details Element

A standard element allows everyone to use the same markup for a particular type of content. That’s why creating a robust polyfill makes sense. Disclaimer: This is quite a technical article, and while I’ve tried to minimize the code snippets, the article still contains quite a few of them. So, be prepared!

Read more...

The State Of Animation 2014

The post-Flash era is hardly free of animation. CSS animation is quickly becoming a cornerstone of user-friendly interfaces on mobile and desktop, and JavaScript libraries already exist to handle complex interactive animations. In the wake of so much “CSS versus JavaScript animation” infighting, a new API specifically for web animation is coming out that might just unite both camps.

The State Of Animation 2014

It’s an exciting time for web animation, and also a time of grave miscommunication and misinformation. In 2014, I had the chance to travel the world to talk about using animation in user interfaces and design. I met and interviewed dozens of people who use and champion both CSS and JavaScript. After interviewing so many developers, designers and browser representatives, I discovered a technical and human story to be told.

Read more...

Creating A “Save For Later” Chrome Extension With Modern Web Tools

Creating an extension for the Chrome browser is a great way to take a small and useful idea and distribute it to millions of people through the Chrome Web Store. This article walks you through the development process of a Chrome extension with modern web tools and libraries.

Creating A “Save For Later” Chrome Extension With Modern Web Tools

It all begins with an idea. Mine was formed while reading an interesting (and long) article about new front-end technologies. I was concentrating on reading the article when suddenly my wife called me to kick out a poor baby pigeon that got stuck on our balcony. When I finally got back to the article, it was too late — I had to go to work.

Read more...

An Introduction To Unit Testing In AngularJS Applications

AngularJS has grown to become one of the most popular single-page application frameworks. Developed by a dedicated team at Google, the outcome is substantial and widely used in both community and industry projects.

An Introduction To Unit Testing In AngularJS Applications

One of the reasons for AngularJS’ success is its outstanding ability to be tested. It’s strongly supported by Karma (the spectacular test runner written by Vojta Jína) and its multiple plugins. Karma, combined with its fellows Mocha, Chai and Sinon, offers a complete toolset to produce quality code that is easy to maintain, bug-free and well documented.

Read more...

Making Modal Windows Better For Everyone

To you, modal windows might be a blessing of additional screen real estate, providing a way to deliver contextual information, notifications and other actions relevant to the current screen. On the other hand, modals might feel like a hack that you’ve been forced to commit in order to cram extra content on the screen. These are the extreme ends of the spectrum, and users are caught in the middle. Depending on how a user browses the Internet, modal windows can be downright confusing.

Making Modal Windows Better For Everyone

Modals quickly shift visual focus from one part of a website or application to another area of (hopefully related) content. The action is usually not jarring if initiated by the user, but it can be annoying and disorienting if it occurs automatically, as happens with the modal window’s evil cousins, the “nag screen” and the “interstitial.”

Read more...

Animating Without jQuery

There’s a false belief in the web development community that CSS animation is the only performant way to animate on the web. This myth has coerced many developers to abandon JavaScript-based animation altogether, thereby (1) forcing themselves to manage complex UI interaction within style sheets, (2) locking themselves out of supporting Internet Explorer 8 and 9, and (3) forgoing the beautiful motion design physics that are possible only with JavaScript.

Animating Without jQuery

Reality check: JavaScript-based animation is often as fast as CSS-based animation — sometimes even faster. CSS animation only appears to have a leg up because it’s typically compared to jQuery’s $.animate(), which is, in fact, very slow. However, JavaScript animation libraries that bypass jQuery deliver incredible performance by avoiding DOM manipulation as much as possible. These libraries can be up to 20 times faster than jQuery.

Read more...

↑ Back to top