Posts Tagged ‘JavaScript’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘JavaScript’.

Qualities Of Good Flux Implementations

It has been an exciting year for my team. Last year we kicked off a project using React, and over the course of the project we've learned a lot about React and Flux — Facebook's recommended architectural principles for React apps. In this article, we'll take a look at some of the key lessons we've learned.

Qualities Of Good Flux Implementations

Whether you're new to React and Flux, or going as far as building your own Flux implementation, I think you'll not only enjoy this journey with us, but find some thought-provoking questions and wisdom you can apply in your own endeavors.

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React To The Future With Isomorphic Apps

Things often come full circle in software engineering. The web in particular started with servers delivering content down to the client. Recently, with the creation of modern web frameworks such as AngularJS and Ember, we’ve seen a push to render on the client and only use a server for an API. We’re now seeing a possible return or, rather, more of a combination of both architectures happening.

React To The Future With Isomorphic Apps

React has quickly risen to immense popularity in the JavaScript community. There are a number of reasons for its success. One is that Facebook created it and uses it. This means that many developers at Facebook work with it, fixing bugs, suggesting features and so on.

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Web Scraping With Node.js

Web scraping is the process of programmatically retrieving information from the Internet. As the volume of data on the web has increased, this practice has become increasingly widespread, and a number of powerful services have emerged to simplify it.

Web Scraping With Node.js

Unfortunately, the majority of them are costly, limited or have other disadvantages. Instead of turning to one of these third-party resources, you can use Node.js to create a powerful web scraper that is both extremely versatile and completely free.

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Terrible JavaScript Mistakes To Avoid With A Static Code Analyzer

Hardly any line of my code comes out perfect the first time I write it. Well, most of the time… Some of the time… Um, hardly ever. The truth is that I spend more time chasing down my own stupid programming errors than I’d like to admit. That’s why I use static analyzers in every JavaScript file I write.

Terrible JavaScript Mistakes To Avoid With A Static Code Analyzer

Static analyzers look at code and find problems before you run it. They do simple checks, like enforcing syntax (for example, tabs instead of spaces), and more holistic checks, like making sure your functions aren’t too complex. Static analyzers also find errors that you can’t find with testing, like instances of == when you meant ===.

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AngularJS’ Internals In Depth

AngularJS presents a remarkable number of interesting design choices in its code base. Two particularly interesting cases are the way in which scopes work and how directives behave.

AngularJS' Internals In Depth

The first thing anyone is taught when approaching AngularJS for the first time is that directives are meant to interact with the DOM, or whatever manipulates the DOM for you, such as jQuery (get over jQuery already!). What immediately becomes (and remains) confusing for most, though, is the interaction between scopes, directives and controllers.

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Why AJAX Isn’t Enough

AJAX calls have moved user interaction on the Web a huge step forward: We no longer need to reload the page in response to each user input. Using AJAX, we can call specific procedures on the server and update the page based on the returned values, giving our applications fast interactivity.

Why Ajax Isn't Enough

What AJAX calls do not cover are updates from the server, which are needed for the modern real-time and collaborative web. This need for updates covers use cases ranging from a couple of users collaboratively editing a document to the notification of potentially millions of readers of a news website that a goal has been scored in a World Cup match. Another messaging pattern, in addition to the response request of AJAX, is needed — one that works at any scale. PubSub (as in “publish and subscribe”) is an established messaging pattern that achieves this.

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Chartist.js, An Open-Source Library For Responsive Charts

The list of charting libraries for the web is already quite long, and you might ask yourself why we would need to make it any longer. Whenever you need to develop an application’s dashboard, embed some usage statistics or simply visualize some data, you will find yourself looking for a charting library that fits your needs.

Chartist.js, An Open Source Library For Responsive Charts

Chartist was developed for a very particular need: to create simple responsive charts. While other charting libraries do a great job of visualizing data, something is always missing to satisfy this simple yet demanding need.

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Making A Complete Polyfill For The HTML5 Details Element

HTML5 introduced a bunch of new tags, one of which is <details>. This element is a solution for a common UI component: a collapsible block. Almost every framework, including Bootstrap and jQuery UI, has its own plugin for a similar solution, but none conform to the HTML5 specification — probably because most were around long before <details> got specified and, therefore, represent different approaches.

Making A Complete Polyfill For The HTML5 Details Element

A standard element allows everyone to use the same markup for a particular type of content. That’s why creating a robust polyfill makes sense. Disclaimer: This is quite a technical article, and while I’ve tried to minimize the code snippets, the article still contains quite a few of them. So, be prepared!

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