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Posts Tagged ‘JavaScript’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘JavaScript’.

We’re Gonna Need A Bigger API!

Everyone likes stuff that moves about on the Web, right? Remember how you cried joyful tears when you first used <marquee>? I do. I nearly sobbed all the water out of my body as I gazed upon “JAKE’S COOL WEBSITE” bobbing back and forth in uppercase serif. Of course, we’re more mature as an industry these days.

We’re Gonna Need A Bigger API!

We’ve learned that users don’t want websites to look like a CSI console having a personal crisis; instead, we go for smooth transitions that enhance the experience, rather than being the experience themselves. In terms of animation APIs, we’ve been poorly catered to, leaving us to hack around with timers that weren’t really built for animation. Things have been steadily improving in that area, but the new Web Animation specification looks set to shake things up a lot.


Case Study The Evolution Of The BEM Methodology

This case study is about the evolution of the BEM, a methodology that enables team members to collaborate and communicate ideas using a unified language that consists of simple yet powerful terms: blocks, elements, modifiers.

The History Of The BEM Methodology

Learn about the challenges that a big company faces when gradually building an entire ecosystem of services with an ever-growing team of developers.


Application A Thorough Introduction To Backbone.Marionette (Part 1)

Backbone.js is quickly becoming the most popular framework for building modular client-side JavaScript applications. This is largely due to its low barrier to entry; getting started with it is super-simple.

A Thorough Introduction To Backbone.Marionette (Part 1)

However, unlike Ember.js, Backbone, being so minimal, also leaves a lot up to the developer to figure out. So, once you start getting into more advanced applications, it’s no longer so simple. Backbone.Marionette was created to alleviate a lot of the growing pains of Backbone development.


Which JavaScript Recipe Is Right For You?

JavaScript has been called everything from great to awful to the assembly language of the Web, but we all use it. Love JavaScript or hate it: everyone admits there are serious flaws and not many other choices.

Which JavaScript Recipe Is Right For You?

Let's start with some fundamental negatives. JavaScript has no good answer for some really basic features of modern programming languages, such as private variables and functions, packages and modules, standard localization mechanisms and code completion in editors.


From The Server To The Client Client-Side Templating

Using templates in the browser is becoming more and more widespread. Moving application logic from the server to the client, and the increasing usage of MVC-like patterns (model–view–controller) inspired templates to embrace the browser.

Client-Side Templating

This used to be a server-side only affair, but templates are actually very powerful and expressive in client-side development as well. In general, leveraging templates is a great way to separate markup and logic in views, and to maximize code reusability and maintainability. With a syntax close to the desired output (i.e. HTML), you have a clear and fast way to get things done.


Building A Relationship Between CSS & JavaScript

jQuery, Prototype, Node.js, Backbone.js, Mustache and thousands of JavaScript microlibraries all combine into a single undeniable fact: JavaScript is popular. It’s so popular, in fact, that we often find ourselves using it in places where another solution might be better in the long run.

Building A Relationship Between CSS & JavaScript

Even though we keep JavaScript, CSS and HTML in different files, the concepts behind progressive enhancement are getting all knotted up with every jQuery plugin we use and with every weird technique that crops up. Because JavaScript is so powerful, there are a lot of overlaps in capability between JavaScript and HTML (building document structure) and JavaScript and CSS (injecting style information).


Performance Writing Fast, Memory-Efficient JavaScript

JavaScript engines such as Google’s V8 (Chrome, Node) are specifically designed for the fast execution of large JavaScript applications. As you develop, if you care about memory usage and performance, you should be aware of some of what's going on in your user's browser's JavaScript engine behind the scenes.

Writing Fast, Memory-Efficient JavaScript

Whether it’s V8, SpiderMonkey (Firefox), Carakan (Opera), Chakra (IE) or something else, doing so can help you better optimize your applications. That's not to say one should optimize for a single browser or engine. Never do that. There are many common pitfalls when it comes to writing memory-efficient and fast code, and in this article we’re going to explore some test-proven approaches for writing code that performs better.


Better Code Quality Why Coding Style Matters

When I was studying computer science in college, I had one extremely tough professor. His name was Dr. Maxey and he taught the more complicated courses like data structures and computer architecture. He was a wonderful teacher with a talent for articulating difficult concepts, but also an extremely tough grader. Not only would he look over your code to make sure that it worked, he would take off points for stylistic issues.

Why Coding Style Matters

If you were missing appropriate comments, or even if you misspelled a word or two in your comments, he would deduct points. If your code was “messy” (by his standards), he would deduct points. The message was clear: the quality of your code is not just in its execution but also in its appearance. That was my first experience with coding style.


Designing Better JavaScript APIs

At some point or another, you will find yourself writing JavaScript code that exceeds the couple of lines from a jQuery plugin. Your code will do a whole lot of things; it will (ideally) be used by many people who will approach your code differently. They have different needs, knowledge and expectations.

Designing JavaScript APIs For Usability

This article covers the most important things that you will need to consider before and while writing your own utilities and libraries. We'll focus on how to make your code accessible to other developers. A couple of topics will be touching upon jQuery for demonstration, yet this article is neither about jQuery nor about writing plugins for it.


Useful JavaScript Libraries and jQuery Plugins

If you have a problem and need a solution for it, chances are high that a JavaScript library or jQuery plugin exists that was created to solve this very problem. Such libraries are always great to have in your bookmarks or in your local folders, especially if you aren't a big fan of cross-browser debugging.

JavaScript Library
Image credit: Yeoman

A JavaScript library isn't always the best solution: it should never be a single point of failure for any website, and neither should a website rely on JavaScript making the content potentially inaccessible. Progressive enhancement is our friend; sometimes JavaScript won't load properly, or won't be supported — e.g. users of mobile devices might run into latency issues or performance issues with some JavaScript-libraries. Often large all-around JavaScript libraries such as jQuery might be an overkill, while tiny JavaScript micro-libraries could serve as good, "light" alternatives for a particular problem. We'll present some of them today.

In this two-part overview (part 1 and part 2), we feature some of the most useful JavaScript and jQuery libraries which could be just the right solutions for your common problems. You might know some of these libraries, but you probably don't know all of them. In either case, we hope that this overview will help you find or rediscover some tools that you could use in your next projects.


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