Posts Tagged ‘Layouts’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Layouts’.

Killer Responsive Layouts With CSS Regions

As Web designers, we are largely constrained by the layout features available to us. Content placed inside a container will often naturally extend the container vertically, wrapping the content. If a design requires elements to remain a certain height, then our options are limited. In these cases, we can only add a scroll bar or hide the overflow. The CSS Regions specification provides a new option.

Killer Responsive Layouts With CSS Regions

Regions are a new part of the CSS specification, so not all browsers have implemented them, and in some cases you might have to enable a flag to use them. They have recently gained support in iOS7 and Safari 7, as well as Safari 6.1+. Adobe maintains a list of supported browsers and instructions on enabling regions and other features.

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Designing CSS Layouts With Flexbox Is As Easy As Pie

Flexible box layout (or flexbox) is a new box model optimized for UI layout. As one of the first CSS modules designed for actual layout (floats were really meant mostly for things such as wrapping text around images), it makes a lot of tasks much easier, or even possible at all.

Centering Elements With Flexbox Is As Easy As Pie

Flexbox’s repertoire includes the simple centering of elements (both horizontally and vertically), the expansion and contraction of elements to fill available space, and source-code independent layout, among others abilities.

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Six CSS Layout Features To Look Forward To

A few concerns keep bobbing up now and then for Web developers, one of which relates to how to lay out a given design. Developers have made numerous attempts to do so with existing solutions. Several articles have been written on finding the holy grail of CSS layouts, but to date, not a single solution works without major caveats.

Six CSS Layout Features To Look Forward To

At the W3Conf, I gave a talk on how the CSS Working Group is attempting to solve the concerns of Web developers with multiple proposals. There are six layout proposals that are relevant to us, all of which I described in the talk. Here is a little more about these proposals and how they will help you in developing websites in the future.

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CSS3 Flexible Box Layout Explained

The flexible box layout module — or “flexbox,” to use its popular nickname — is an interesting part of the W3C Working Draft. The flexbox specification is still a draft and subject to change, so keep your eyes on the W3C, but it is part of a new arsenal of properties that will revolutionize how we lay out pages. At least it will be when cross-browser support catches up.

In the meantime, we can experiment with flexbox and even use it on production websites where fallbacks will still render the page correctly. It may be a little while until we consider it as mainstream as, say, border-radius, but our job is to investigate new technologies and use them where possible. That said, when it comes to something as fundamental as page layout, we need to tread carefully.

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The Semantic Grid System: Page Layout For Tomorrow

CSS grid frameworks can make your life easier, but they're not without their faults. Fortunately, modern techniques offer a new approach to constructing page layouts. But before getting to the solution, we must first understand the three seemingly insurmountable flaws currently plaguing CSS grids.

LESS CSS

The biggest complaint I’ve heard from purists since I created The 1KB CSS Grid two years ago is that CSS grid systems don’t allow for a proper separation of mark-up and presentation. Grid systems require that Web designers add .grid_x CSS classes to HTML elements, mixing presentational information with otherwise semantic mark-up.

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Equal Height Column Layouts with Borders and Negative Margins in CSS

"What? Another "Equal Height Columns" article? Enough already!" If this is what you think, then think again because this solution is different. It does not rely on any of the usual tricks. It does not use images, nor extra markup, nor CSS3, nor pseudo-classes, nor Javascript, nor absolute positioning. All it uses is border and negative margins. Please note that this article will also demonstrate different construct techniques and will brush up on a few concepts.

Two column layout

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In this post we will build three layouts using CSS: a two column layout with no wrapper div, a two column layout with two vertical borders between the columns and a three column layout with a single wrapper. All layouts have coding examples and demos for your convenience.

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Finding Alternative Sources Of Typographic Layout In Our Surroundings

Studying art and design usually starts with a deep exploration of elements and principles. Among these elements, the most basic ones — line, point and plane — usually figure in a work of art or design. Thus, we can abstract art and design compositions to lines, points and planes when analyzing them. Not only is this abstraction useful for understanding the structure of a composition, but it also offers new sources of layout inspiration and experimentation.

http://www.faub.org/two.html

According to Wucius Wong in his book Principles of Form and Design (page 42), point, line and plane can be considered conceptual design elements because, although they are not always explicit or visible, they seem to be present by implication. He explains how an angle, for example, implies the existence of a point and how lines, by marking the contour of an object, imply the presence of a plane.

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