Posts Tagged ‘Legacy’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Legacy’.

What Do We Really Mean By Art?

Mark Rothko, an American artist who described himself as an "abstract painter", once said that he was not the kind of person interested in the relationship of form, color or similars. He didn't define himself as an abstractionist, but rather as a person interested only in expressing basic human emotions such as doom, tragedy, ecstasy and so on. This was one person's vision of art, but what do we mean by art today? Why is defining the concept so difficult?

Alberto Cerriteño

This article is an exploration of the meaning of art and an attempt to understand the relationship between art and artists, with some useful insights via interviews with both traditional and digital artists.

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The Evolution of The Logo

Logo design has been a controversial subject in the design press lately. One branding professional recently claimed that logo design is not that hard to do and another said that logos are dead; some rebutted while others concurred. Why all the fuss?

We live in a Brand Era, where branding is in, and for some, aspiring to the Paul Rand style of logo craftsmanship is about as hip and contemporary as writing your invoices with a quill. Yes, logo design is only one facet of the powerful force that we call brand identity. Yes, a branded design environment can communicate sophisticated brand meaning without much (any?) usage of logos.

MTV Logos

But some 'brand gurus' or 'brand evangelists' (translation: 'bastions of corporate pretension') seem to enjoy making hyperbolic pronouncements just to sound shocking or cutting-edge. Logo design is not dead. The technological advancements and tumultuous industries of our century are causing its role in our culture to evolve.

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The Beauty Of Typography: Writing Systems And Calligraphy, Part 2

The beauty of writing systems is that each has something unique from which to draw inspiration. Two weeks ago, in the first part of this article, we covered Arabic and East-Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Vietnamese) and a few Indic scripts (Devanagari, Thai and Tibetan).

Calligraphy82 in Hebrew and Cyrillic

We are now back for the second (and last) part, which is a bit different but just as interesting. You will see that some features of the languages presented here clearly correspond to our Latin-based system, while others are unfamiliar. The point of this second part is to complete our look at writing systems of the world and to think more generally about what they signify. We'll cover Hebrew, Modern European scripts, Mongolian, Inuktitut and International Phonetic Alphabet.

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100 Years Of Propaganda: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Propaganda is most well known in the form of war posters. But at its core, it is a mode of communication aimed at influencing the attitude of a community toward some cause or position, and that doesn't have to be a bad thing. Although propaganda is often used to manipulate human emotions by displaying facts selectively, it can also be very effective at conveying messages and hence can be used in web design, too.

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Notice that propaganda uses loaded messages to change the attitude toward the subject in the target audience. When applied to web design, you may experiment with techniques used in propaganda posters and use them creatively to achieve a unique and memorable design.

In this article, we look at various types of propaganda and the people behind it, people who are rarely seen next to their work. You will also see how the drive for propaganda shaped many of the modern art movements we see today. Notice that this post isn't supposed to be an ultimate showcase of propaganda artists. Something or somebody is missing? Please let us know in the comments to this post!

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Writing Systems And Calligraphy Of The World

The beauty of typography has no borders. While most of us work with the familiar Latin alphabet, international projects usually require quite extensive knowledge about less familiar writing systems from around the world. The aesthetics and structure of such designs can be strongly related to the shape and legibility of the letterforms, so learning about international writing systems will certainly help you create more attractive and engaging Web designs.

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Pick any language you like: Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, maybe Nepali? Each is based on a different writing system, which makes it interesting to figure out how they work. Today, we'll cover five categories of writing systems. This may sound tedious and academic, but it's not. If you take the time to understand them, you'll find that they all give us something special. We've tried to present at least one special feature of each language from which you can draw inspiration and apply to your own typography work. We'll cover: East Asian writing systems, Arabic and Indic scripts (Brahmic). If you are interested, we will cover Cyrillic, Hebrew and other writing systems in the next post.

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_Why: A Tale Of A Post-Modern Genius

Why the Lucky Stiff (or _Why for short) was one of the brightest and most inspiring programmers in activity. He became famous through a series of blogs and through the incredible amount of open-source projects that he maintained over the course of more than seven years.

_Why's popularity grew along with the Ruby programming language's popularity. When the Rails hype took off in 2005, a great number of young developers started looking to learn about Ruby, and that's when most of them found Why's (Poignant) Guide to Ruby, a Creative Commons book in both HTML and PDF that embodied all of its author's characteristics: an uneasy artistic mind with a different take on what programming is all about.

2007-cover-shut

Even those who didn't happen to read the Poignant Guide could not program in Ruby without a touch of _Why's brilliance. He had by then written several libraries that were fundamental parts of everyday programming tasks, such as Hpricot, an HTML parser with an API that somehow resembles jQuery's DOM manipulation API.

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Symmetry: A Balancing Act In Two (Or More) Parts

Symmetry is the ordering principle in nature that represents the center of balance between two or more opposing sides. As a fundamental design principle, it permeates everything: from man-made architecture to natural crystalline formations. In nature, symmetry exists with such precision and beauty that we can’t help but attribute it to intelligence–such equal proportions and organization would seem to be created only on purpose. Consequently, humans have borrowed this principle for its most iconic creations and symbols.

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There are several types of symmetry, but the most basic are translation, reflection and rotational. Each of them has specific and practical expressions in nature, and each can be used to communicate intuitive principles when appropriately and subtly integrated in a design. As a simple aesthetic, these opposites that work together can add visual appeal.

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