Posts Tagged ‘Linux’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Linux’.

Introduction To Linux Commands

At the heart of every modern Mac and Linux computer is the “terminal.” The terminal evolved from the text-based computer terminals of the 1960s and ’70s, which themselves replaced punch cards as the main way to interact with a computer. It’s also known as the command shell, or simply “shell.” Windows has one, too, but it’s called the “command prompt” and is descended from the MS-DOS of the 1980s.

Introduction To Linux Commands

Mac, Linux and Windows computers today are mainly controlled through user-friendly feature-rich graphical user interfaces (GUIs), with menus, scroll bars and drag-and-drop interfaces. But all of the basic stuff can still be accomplished by typing text commands into the terminal or command prompt. Using Finder or Explorer to open a folder is akin to the cd command (for “change directory”). Viewing the contents of a folder is like ls (short for “list,” or dir in Microsoft’s command prompt). And there are hundreds more for moving files, editing files, launching applications, manipulating images, backing up and restoring stuff, and much more.

Read more...

Setup A Ubuntu VPS For Hosting Ruby On Rails Applications

Let’s assume you have built a nice little Ruby on Rails application on your local development machine. Now it’s time for the application to go live. But where should you host this application? You know that you (or your client) do not have much money to spend, and so you look at the options. You notice right away that managed hosting of applications tends to be relatively expensive.

Screenshot

Heroku is a good option, but it doesn’t give you storage space, and more importantly, it lacks full control. Luckily, you have a suitable alternative: a VPS. This tutorial will help you get through the steps required to set up an Ubuntu VPS that is capable of hosting (multiple) Ruby on Rails applications. This tutorial builds on part 1. We recommend that you follow that part first and use the same Ubuntu local development machine that you set up there to walk through this part.

Read more...

Set Up An Ubuntu Local Development Machine For Ruby On Rails

So, you want to develop Ruby on Rails applications? While loads of (introductory) tutorials are available for developing Ruby on Rails applications, there seems to be some uncertainty about setting up a lean and up-to-date local development environment.

Set Up An Ubuntu Local Development Machine For Ruby On Rails

This tutorial will guide you through the steps of setting up an Ubuntu local development machine for Ruby on Rails. Part 2 of this tutorial, which will be published here later, will help you through the steps to set up an Ubuntu VPS. For now, knowing that VPS stands for virtual private server is sufficient. It will be able to host your newly developed Ruby on Rails applications. But let’s focus on the local development machine first.

Read more...

What To Do When Your Website Goes Down

Have you ever heard a colleague answer the phone like this: "Good afterno… Yes… What? Completely?… When did it go down?… Really, that long?… We'll look into it right away… Yes, I understand… Of course… Okay, speak to you soon… Bye." The call may have been followed by some cheesy ’80s rock ballad coming from the speaker phone, interrupted by "Thank you for holding. You are now caller number 126 in the queue." That's your boss calling the hosting company's 24 hour "technical support" line.

Screenshot

[fblike]

An important website has gone down, and sooner or later, heads will turn to the Web development corner of the office, where you are sitting quietly, minding your own business, regretting that you ever mentioned "Linux" on your CV. You need to take action. Your company needs you. Your client needs you. Here's what to do.

Read more...

VI Editor / Linux Terminal Cheat Sheet (PDF)

We've been releasing many icon sets and WordPress themes on Smashing Magazine, yet today we are glad to announce the release of a bit different freebie. This post features a VI Help Sheet, a cheat sheet for the VI Editor, for all web-developers out there who are working on Linux. The help sheet was designed by GoSquared and released for Smashing Magazine and its readers.

The cheat sheet contains terminal commands for modes and controls, inserting text, cursor navigation, deleting text, searching and replacing. Download it. Print it. Stick it on the wall and get commanding.

Read more...

How To Develop Websites On Linux

In this article we will look at tools that can help those of you who want to develop websites on a Linux platform, from powerful text editors to desktop and system features. How do you edit files remotely without FTP plug-ins? What are package managers, and why they are cool? In which Web browsers can you test your applications?

Gedit Themed

I wish I could cover many more topics: using the command line, basics of Vim, Nautilus features in detail, Nautilus scripting, neat command line tools, basic server configuration and many others. But if I addressed all of the issues that arise from time to time on the Internet, this article would turn into a small book. This isn't an article on "How to do X or Y on Linux" or "How to use [insert app name here]." And we cannot cover more comprehensive IDEs such as Eclipse and NetBeans, each of which requires separate articles.

You probably already have some idea of how to find and install applications for your favorite distros. However, we will point you to the right place anyway to download, for example, scripts and plug-ins. So, let's begin!

Read more...

7 Version Control Systems Reviewed

If you’ve ever collaborated with other people on a project, you know the frustration of constantly swapping files. Some do it by email, some through file upload services and some by other methods. It’s a pain in the neck, and every designer and developer knows it. Revision control is an excellent way to combat the problem of sharing files between workers.

Most web-developers have probably worked with some sort of revision control system, but designers may find it a foreign concept. The most obvious benefit of using revision control is the ability to have an unlimited number of people working on the same code base, without having to constantly send files back and forth.

Screenshot

But designers and developers can both benefit from using revision control systems to keep copies of their files and designs. You can instantly browse previous “commits” to your repository and revert to earlier versions if something happens.

This article reviews some of the top open-source version control systems and tools that setting up a version control system easy.

Read more...
1

↑ Back to top