Posts Tagged ‘Maintenance’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Maintenance’.

WordPress Performance Improvements That Can Go Wrong

If you've searched recently for tips on optimizing WordPress’ performance, then you have definitely come across various techniques that people recommend.

WordPress Performance Improvements That Can Go Wrong

These include all sorts of caching mechanisms, such as reverse proxies, object caching and cache plugins, CSS minification, using sprites for images, and so on. All of them are viable and effective ways to speed up a WordPress website’s performance. However, be careful when implementing any of these techniques, and always test their effect on your particular website.

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The Developer’s Guide To Conflict-Free JavaScript And CSS In WordPress

Imagine you’re playing the latest hash-tag game on Twitter when you see this friendly tweet: "You might want to check your #WP site. It includes two copies of jQuery. Nothing’s broken, but loading time will be slower."

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You check your source code, and sure enough you see this:

<script src="/wp-includes/js/jquery/jquery.js?ver=1.6.1" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="/wp-content/plugins/some-plugin/jquery.js"></script>

What went wrong? The first copy of jQuery is included the WordPress way, while some-plugin includes jQuery as you would on a static HTML page. A number of JavaScript frameworks are included in WordPress by default.

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Writing CSS For Others

I think a lot of us CSS authors are doing it wrong. We are selfish by nature; we get into our little bubbles, writing CSS (as amazing as it may be) with only ourselves in mind. How many times have you inherited a CSS file that’s made you say “WTF” at least a dozen times?

HTML has a standard format and syntax that everyone understands. For years, programmers have widely agreed on standards for their respective languages. CSS doesn’t seem to be there yet: everyone has their own favorite format, their own preference between single-line and multi-line, their own ideas on organization, and so on.

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The Neglected Necessities Of Design

Right now is an exciting time to be in the Web design community. Every month we seem to stumble on a new thought-provoking way to put our expanding tool set to use for our clients and the patrons of the Web. Many designers are chomping at the bit to litter their websites with new CSS, advanced HTML and ultra-engaging JavaScript. By all means, go out and use every last declaration and element you can get your hands on. Abusing, misusing and taking advantage of everything the Web could possibly offer is the best way to learn about what we can and can’t and should and shouldn’t do in future.

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Whether you are excitedly exploring responsive design, diving headlong into accessibility, building a typographic masterpiece or seeing what level of interactivity you can achieve, all of your Web-based projects should have a common core. All of the new methods being discussed in the design community daily might be overwhelming, but no matter what route you ultimately take, almost any Web project you embark on today should start with solid HTML and logical CSS. This may seem like common sense, but the fact is that very, very few websites today benefit from sensationally optimized HTML and CSS and appropriately applied JavaScript.

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Optimizing Error Pages: Creating Opportunities Out Of Mistakes

In this article I'll be reviewing a few techniques that will help Web designers and UI professionals to improve their error pages in order to engage visitors and improve overall website experience. As C. S. Lewis once said, “Failures are finger posts on the road to achievement”. Web designers should take this to heart.

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I’ll be focusing on error and maintenance pages, both from tracking as well as usability perspectives. I’ll also be providing a good number of examples on how to use analytics and defensive design in order to optimize user experience for such pages. First, let’s go over the error pages and cover the questions on how to optimize them efficiently.

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Lessons Learned From Maintaining a WordPress Plug-In

Recently I released a WordPress plugin for Google Analytics that adds a tracking code and dozens of various pieces of meta data to blogs. Since the release of version 4, I've updated it 6 times, to the point where it's now at version 4.0.6. In this article I would like to share with you my experiences in maintaining this and other WordPress plug-ins and common good practices that I've distilled from that work.

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The updates that I released had a couple of purposes, ranging from bug fixes to new features and fixes in documentation. While all of these are nice to talk about, the bug fixes are the ones you'll learn the most from, so let's start by going through these.

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Website Maintenance Tips for Front-End Developers

One of the biggest advantages of online media over print is the ability to change, update, and enhance online media at virtually anytime, with virtually no negative side effects. In fact, if a website or web application does not continually offer its users an ever-evolving and growing experience, that site or application would soon become insecure, unusable, and out of date.

Have you beautified your code, validated your markup, and made your XHTML more semantic? Have you implemented basic SEO best practices, spell-checked content, and removed legacy code? Have you ensured JavaScript is unobtrusive, applied the principle of graceful degradation, and minimized the use of Flash? If you've done all those things (and possibly more), what comes next? Are there things you can do to improve your site's overall effectiveness beyond those?

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In this article, we will discuss ways that web designers and front-end coders can keep their websites relevant, timely, and accessible long after a site's launch. This guide goes beyond simple text and graphic updates, common "best practices" for CSS and XHTML, or other things you might see in a typical website checklist. We'll expand on many of the basics, and provide some effective tips for website maintenance geared towards front-end designers and coders.

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