Posts Tagged ‘Navigation’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Navigation’.

Creative And Innovative Navigation Designs

A website has a personality — it is a reflection of the person or organization behind it. When people visit your website, you want it to stand out from the crowd, to be memorable. You want people to come back and use your website or get in touch with you.

Creative And Innovative Navigation Designs

So, to distinguish itself from the unwashed masses, your website not only needs remarkable content, but also has to be innovative yet functional. Ask yourself, what would make life easier for your user? The following websites will whet your appetite for extreme creativity. Browse through and explore them for yourself.

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How Much Has The Web Really Changed?

Responsive design is about more than just layout; it’s about designing for the Web, which means, mostly, for people with browsers. And that’s just about everything we know about the people who visit our websites: they are probably using a browser. All the rest we just don’t know.

How Much Has The Web Really Changed?

Up until not so long ago, we used to base our designs on some rather general assumptions about screen size and input type. With the rise of devices with various screen sizes and alternative ways to interact, these assumptions have turned out to be unreliable. We need to upgrade the defaults that we use when we start designing our websites.

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Infinite Scrolling: Let’s Get To The Bottom Of This

Infinite scroll promised to provide users with a better experience. However, the good is often accompanied by the bad and the ugly. Once we understand the strengths and weaknesses of infinite scrolling, we can begin to use it to empower our interfaces.

Infinite Scrolling: Let's Get To The Bottom Of This

Human nature's framed perception demands an hierarchic interface; an interface that would make it easy for users to find their way around. Infinite scroll, sometimes leaves users feeling disoriented as they travel down the page that never ends.

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Navigation For Mega-Sites

For most websites, navigation is not particularly challenging. A primary navigation bar, supported by sub-navigation, is often enough. Typically, sub-navigation displays the parent, siblings and children of the current page.

Navigation For Mega-Sites

A persistent primary navigation bar shows top-level pages, allowing users to move between sections. However, there is one class of website for which this traditional form of navigation falls short. It is what I refer to as a "mega-site".

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Design PatternsC-Swipe: An Ergonomic Solution To Navigation Fragmentation On Android

There are 3,997 different Android devices. Your navigation should work with all of them. C-Swipe can help: It is an alternative navigation pattern for tablets and mobile devices that is novel, ergonomic and localized.

Navigation Fragmentation On Android

This article provides a detailed walk-through of the design and code and provides a downloadable mini-app so that you can try out C-Swipe to see whether it’s right for your app.

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Performance & RWDImplementing Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

The varying viewports that our websites encounter on a daily basis continue to demand more from responsive design. Not only must we continue to tackle the issues of content choreography — the art of maintaining order and context throughout the chaotic ebb and flow of the Web browser — but we must also meet the expectations of users.

Implementing Off-Canvas Navigation For A Responsive Website

They’re not sitting still. With the likes of Firefox OS (Boot to Gecko), Chrome OS and now Ubuntu for phones — an OS that makes “Web apps” first-class citizens — delivering native app-like experiences on the Web may become a necessity if users begin to expect it.

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When You Shouldn’t Use Fitts’s Law To Measure User Experience

The key statement of Fitts’s Law is that the time required to move a pointing device to a target is a function of the distance to the target and its size. In layman’s terms: the closer and larger a target, the faster it is to click on that target. This is easy to understand, not too difficult to implement and it doesn’t seem to make much sense to contradict such a simple and obvious statement.

When You Shouldn’t Use Fitts’s Law To Measure User Experience

However, before you start applying Fitts’s Law on every single pixel you can find, consider a few problems that might arise for you as an interaction designer.

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