Posts Tagged ‘Opinion Column’

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Opinion Column’.

Recent Trends In Storytelling And New Business Models For Publishers

It is clear that the ongoing dramatic transformation of the media industry in all its formats (audio, video and text) leaves the door open for a complete reinvention of the publishing business. This transition has opened up opportunities for experimentation, and many players are trying to define the future of media in general, and journalism in particular.

Recent Trends In Storytelling And New Business Models For Publishers

In this article, we will discuss several recent such experiments, with special focus on new forms of storytelling, as well as new business models for publishers — a fascinating recent trend called “subcompact publishing” will be our main reference.

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Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code

Much has been written recently in the ongoing debate between native and HTML5 applications. There are three principal ways to develop a mobile solution: native code, hybrid mobile app, mobile Web app. Developing an application in HTML5 is a way to leverage code across multiple platforms, rather than having to write the entire application from scratch for each platform.

Best Of Both Worlds: Mixing HTML5 And Native Code

As such, much of the user interface, perhaps the entire interface, would be done in HTML. “Hybrid application” is a term often given to applications that are developed largely in HTML5 for the user interface and that rely on native code to access device-specific features that are not readily available to Web applications.

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Progressive Enhancement Is Faster

The aim of republishing the original article by Jake is to raise awareness and support the discussion about the role of progressive enhancement within the community. We look forward to your opinions and thoughts in the comments section. – Ed.

Progressive enhancement has become a bit of a hot topic recently, most recently with Tom Dale conclusively showing it to be a futile act, but only by misrepresenting what progressive enhancement is and what its benefits are.

Progressive Enhancement Is Faster

You shouldn't cater to those who have deliberately disabled JavaScript, unless of course you have a particular use case there, e.g. you're likely to get significant numbers of users with the Tor Browser, which comes with JS disabled by default for security. If you do have that use case, progressive enhancement helps, but that's not its main benefit.

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On Creative Leadership

I have spent nearly a decade experimenting with a single goal in mind: to create scalable, predictably insightful, inspirational environments. I have led creative teams in these environments, and I’m currently doing it as the Director of Web Interface and Development at Astonish (a digital marketing company in Rhode Island, US).

On Creative Leadership

It hasn’t been easy, because forcing inspiration is impossible. You have to use finesse and let it come to you. What follows is what I’ve found to help my team and me harness inspiration effectively.

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WebKit Has Implemented srcset, And It’s A Good Thing

WebKit has made some serious news by finally implementing the srcset attribute. As Chair of the W3C’s Responsive Images Community Group, I’ve been alternately hoping for and dreading this moment for some time now. It turns out to be good news for all involved parties—the users browsing the Web, most of all.

Responsive Images

As with all matters pertaining to “responsive images”: it’s complicated, and it can be hard keeping up with the signal in all the noise. Here’s what you need to know. As originally proposed, the srcset attribute allowed developers to specify a list of sources for an image attribute, to be delivered based on the pixel density of the user’s display:

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Teaching Web Design To New Students In Higher Education

The Web is evolving rapidly. Front-end Web development has been majorly affected by recent changes in coding techniques and approaches. In 2003, a competent front-end Web developer would have known HTML and CSS, possibly with a bit of copy-and-pasted JavaScript, and they built websites that would be viewed on desktop computers.

Teaching Web Design To New Students In Higher Education

Not so in 2013! Now, a competent front-end Web developer is well-versed in HTML and CSS, JavaScript and jQuery, CSS preprocessors, new techniques such as responsive design and mobile first, and a world of new devices for viewing websites.

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What Leap Motion And Google Glass Mean For Future User Experience

Editor's note: Please note that this article explores an entirely hypothetical scenario, and these are opinions, some of which you may not agree with. However, the opinions are based on current trends, statistics and existing technology. If you’re the kind of designer who is interested in developing the future, the author encourages you to read the sources that are linked throughout the article.

With the Leap Motion controller being released on June 27th and the Google Glass Explorer program already live, it is obvious that our reliance on the mouse or even the monitor to interact with the Web will eventually become obsolete.

What Leap Motion And Google Glass Mean For Future User Experience Design

In this article, we’ll travel five to ten years into the future and explore a world where Google Glass, Leap Motion and a few other technologies are as much a part of our daily lives as our smartphones and desktops are now.

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