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Posts Tagged ‘Performance’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Performance’.

Performance Optimization How To Make Your Websites Faster On Mobile Devices

A recent study (PDF) found that more than 80% of people are disappointed with the experience of browsing Web on mobile devices and would use their smartphones more if the browsing experience improved.

How To Make Your Websites Faster On Mobile Devices

This isn’t surprising when 64% of smartphone users expect websites to load in 4 seconds or less, while the average website takes more than twice that amount, at 9 seconds. This article explains techniques you can use to make your websites faster on mobile devices.


Responsible Considerations For Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been evolving rapidly ever since Ethan Marcotte coined the term two years ago. Since then, techniques have emerged, become best practices and formed part of our ever-changing methodology.

Readability app

A few obvious examples are the multitude of responsive image techniques, conditional loading, and responsive design and server-side components (RESS), among many other existing and emerging strands stemming from the core concept of responsive Web design.


Maintainable Code Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

Right up front, I’ll offer some simple advice: In production, your code should be as performance-friendly as possible. This means, Gzip’ing, concatenating and minifying as many assets as possible, thus serving the smallest possible files and the least number of files.

Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

I don’t think anyone would argue that these suggestions aren’t best practices (even if we don’t implement them in every project). Now that we’ve got that out of the way, how can we use white space in development code to ensure that our files are as readable and maintainable as possible?


Coding Q&A: CSS Performance, Debugging, Naming Conventions

Howdy folks! Welcome to another round of Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A — the final one, as of now. One more time, we'll answer the best questions which you sent us about CSS.

Coding Q&A: CSS Performance, Debugging, Naming Conventions

It was a great experience to run this Q&A with you - thanks a lot for sharing all your questions with us! We hope we answered them at the best possible, and we'll surely be back with new and exciting Q&A rounds in the future. Enjoy Chris' last round on CSS performance, best practices on CSS class naming, and more!


Bandwidth Media Queries? We Don’t Need ’Em!

From time to time, when a discussion is taking place about ways to implement responsive images, someone comes along and says, “Hey, guys! What we really need is a media query that enables us to send high-resolution images to people on a fast connection and low-resolution images to people on a slow connection.” At least early on, a lot of people agreed.

Media query download tests

At first glance, this makes a lot of sense. High-resolution images have a significant performance cost, because they take longer to download. On a slow network connection, that cost can have a negative impact on the user’s experience.


Burning Excessive Code The Vanilla Web Diet

Editor's note: This is an introductory article about a book idea to be published by Smashing Magazine with Chris Heilmann. Check out what we propose as an idea — explaining a way to reconsider how we build websites to ensure they are leaner and more future-proof. At the end of the article, we'd ask you to fill out a quick survey to show your interest.

The Vanilla Web Diet

The Web as it is now is suffering from an obesity problem. If you surf the Web on a flaky mobile connection or some hotel wireless, you'll find yourself a lot of times staring at a page or app that doesn't do anything and doesn't tell you what is going on either. The spinner in the tab or the URL bar seems to be the thing that gets the most mileage in browsers.


Performance Writing Fast, Memory-Efficient JavaScript

JavaScript engines such as Google’s V8 (Chrome, Node) are specifically designed for the fast execution of large JavaScript applications. As you develop, if you care about memory usage and performance, you should be aware of some of what's going on in your user's browser's JavaScript engine behind the scenes.

Writing Fast, Memory-Efficient JavaScript

Whether it’s V8, SpiderMonkey (Firefox), Carakan (Opera), Chakra (IE) or something else, doing so can help you better optimize your applications. That's not to say one should optimize for a single browser or engine. Never do that. There are many common pitfalls when it comes to writing memory-efficient and fast code, and in this article we’re going to explore some test-proven approaches for writing code that performs better.


Analyzing Network Characteristics Using JavaScript And The DOM, Part 1

As Web developers, we have an affinity for developing with JavaScript. Whatever the language used in the back end, JavaScript and the browser are the primary language-platform combination available at the user’s end. It has many uses, ranging from silly to experience-enhancing.

In this article, we’ll look at some methods of manipulating JavaScript to determine various network characteristics from within the browser — characteristics that were previously available only to applications that directly interface with the operating system. Much of this was discovered while building the Boomerang project to measure real user performance.


CSS3 vs. CSS: A Speed Benchmark

I believe in the power, speed and “update-ability” of CSS3. Not having to load background images as structural enhancements (such as PNGs for rounded corners and gradients) can save time in production (i.e. billable hours) and loading (i.e. page speed). At our company, we've happily been using CSS3 on client websites for over a year now, and I find that implementing many of these properties right now is the most sensible way to build websites.


Until today, all of that was based on an assumption: that I can produce a pixel-perfect Web page with CSS3 quicker than I can with older image-based CSS methods, and that the CSS3 page will load faster, with a smaller overall file size and fewer HTTP requests. As a single use case experiment, I decided to design and code a Web page and add visual enhancements twice: once with CSS3, and a second time using background images sliced directly from the PSD.


Speeding Up Your Website’s Database

Website speed has always been a big issue, and it has become even more important since April 2010, when Google decided to use it in search rankings. However, the focus of the discussion is generally on minimizing file sizes, improving server settings and optimizing CSS and Javascript.



The discussion glosses over another important factor: the speed with which your pages are actually put together on your server. Most big modern websites store their information in a database and use a language such as PHP or ASP to extract it, turn it into HTML and send it to the Web browser.

So, even if you get your home page down to 1.5 seconds (Google’s threshold for being considered a “fast” website), you can still frustrate customers if your search page takes too much time to respond, or if the product pages load quickly but the “Customer reviews” delay for several seconds.


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