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Posts Tagged ‘Performance’.

We are pleased to present below all posts tagged with ‘Performance’.

Creating High-Performance Mobile Websites

Editor’s Note: This article features just one of the many solutions for creating high-performance mobile websites. We suggest that you review different approaches such as Building A Responsive Web App, Improving Mobile Support and Making Your Websites Faster before choosing a particular solution.

People start to lose interest in a website if they don’t get a response within three seconds. Fulfilling this expectation for mobile phone users requires a different approach to usage analysis, design and testing.

Creating High-Performance Mobile Websites

This article expands on the techniques that Johan Johansson explains in his article “How to Make Your Websites Faster on Mobile Devices,” published in April 2013. We’ll demonstrate methods to identify how people interact with a website differently on mobile devices, and the design decisions that can be made based on this understanding.


Gone In 60 Frames Per Second: A Pinterest Paint Performance Case Study

Today we’ll discuss how to improve the paint performance of your websites and Web apps. This is an area that we Web developers have only recently started looking at more closely, and it’s important because it could have an impact on your user engagement and user experience.

Gone In 60 Frames Per Second: A Pinterest Paint Performance Case Study

Frame rate is the rate at which a device produces consecutive images to the screen. A low frames per second (FPS) means that individual frames can be made out by the eye. A high FPS gives users a more responsive feel. You’re probably used to this concept from the world of gaming, but it applies to the Web, too.


Case Study Improve Mobile Support With Server-Side-Enhanced Responsive Design

In many ways, responsive Web design deserves a big share of the honor for making the Web more usable on non-desktop devices. This trend of letting the browser determine more about how a Web page should be displayed makes sense, especially now that mobile browsers are slightly more trustworthy than in the old days of mobile.

Improve Mobile Support With Server-Side-Enhanced Responsive Design

However, a responsive website is not automatically a mobile-friendly website. Amid the buzz of trendy Web development techniques, the good ol’ Web server doesn’t get the spotlight it deserves. Modern Web development should be about finding the right balance between server-side and client-side implementation.


Performance Optimization How To Make Your Websites Faster On Mobile Devices

A recent study (PDF) found that more than 80% of people are disappointed with the experience of browsing Web on mobile devices and would use their smartphones more if the browsing experience improved.

How To Make Your Websites Faster On Mobile Devices

This isn’t surprising when 64% of smartphone users expect websites to load in 4 seconds or less, while the average website takes more than twice that amount, at 9 seconds. This article explains techniques you can use to make your websites faster on mobile devices.


Responsible Considerations For Responsive Web Design

Responsive Web design has been evolving rapidly ever since Ethan Marcotte coined the term two years ago. Since then, techniques have emerged, become best practices and formed part of our ever-changing methodology.

Readability app

A few obvious examples are the multitude of responsive image techniques, conditional loading, and responsive design and server-side components (RESS), among many other existing and emerging strands stemming from the core concept of responsive Web design.


Maintainable Code Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

Right up front, I’ll offer some simple advice: In production, your code should be as performance-friendly as possible. This means, Gzip’ing, concatenating and minifying as many assets as possible, thus serving the smallest possible files and the least number of files.

Using White Space For Readability In HTML And CSS

I don’t think anyone would argue that these suggestions aren’t best practices (even if we don’t implement them in every project). Now that we’ve got that out of the way, how can we use white space in development code to ensure that our files are as readable and maintainable as possible?


Coding Q&A: CSS Performance, Debugging, Naming Conventions

Howdy folks! Welcome to another round of Smashing Magazine CSS Q&A — the final one, as of now. One more time, we'll answer the best questions which you sent us about CSS.

Coding Q&A: CSS Performance, Debugging, Naming Conventions

It was a great experience to run this Q&A with you - thanks a lot for sharing all your questions with us! We hope we answered them at the best possible, and we'll surely be back with new and exciting Q&A rounds in the future. Enjoy Chris' last round on CSS performance, best practices on CSS class naming, and more!


Bandwidth Media Queries? We Don’t Need ’Em!

From time to time, when a discussion is taking place about ways to implement responsive images, someone comes along and says, “Hey, guys! What we really need is a media query that enables us to send high-resolution images to people on a fast connection and low-resolution images to people on a slow connection.” At least early on, a lot of people agreed.

Media query download tests

At first glance, this makes a lot of sense. High-resolution images have a significant performance cost, because they take longer to download. On a slow network connection, that cost can have a negative impact on the user’s experience.


Burning Excessive Code The Vanilla Web Diet

Editor's note: This is an introductory article about a book idea to be published by Smashing Magazine with Chris Heilmann. Check out what we propose as an idea — explaining a way to reconsider how we build websites to ensure they are leaner and more future-proof. At the end of the article, we'd ask you to fill out a quick survey to show your interest.

The Vanilla Web Diet

The Web as it is now is suffering from an obesity problem. If you surf the Web on a flaky mobile connection or some hotel wireless, you'll find yourself a lot of times staring at a page or app that doesn't do anything and doesn't tell you what is going on either. The spinner in the tab or the URL bar seems to be the thing that gets the most mileage in browsers.


Performance Writing Fast, Memory-Efficient JavaScript

JavaScript engines such as Google’s V8 (Chrome, Node) are specifically designed for the fast execution of large JavaScript applications. As you develop, if you care about memory usage and performance, you should be aware of some of what's going on in your user's browser's JavaScript engine behind the scenes.

Writing Fast, Memory-Efficient JavaScript

Whether it’s V8, SpiderMonkey (Firefox), Carakan (Opera), Chakra (IE) or something else, doing so can help you better optimize your applications. That's not to say one should optimize for a single browser or engine. Never do that. There are many common pitfalls when it comes to writing memory-efficient and fast code, and in this article we’re going to explore some test-proven approaches for writing code that performs better.


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